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18

Salt is fundamental to our sense of taste, leaving it out will definitely affect the flavor of a pie (or a cake, or a steak, or whatever) negatively. However, leaving it out shouldn't have affected the texture, you would need to use much more salt than I imagine your pie filling recipe called for to affect the texture at all.


16

tl;dr - Maybe salt was responsible for your texture problem, but it's iffy. Salt is usually thought of as a flavoring agent only, but salt does some serious jobs in the chemistry of cooking. It's worth looking at some options for what this awesome rock does to your custard (and being a cooked mixture of dairy, sugar and eggs, pumpkin pie filling is a ...


15

It definitely needs to cool to prevent burns - the filling is likely even above the boiling point of water, because it has so much sugar in it and has been in a hot oven. Eating it pleasantly warm is one thing, but it takes a long time to cool from over 100C/212F down to a nice warm/hot temperature somewhere around 50C/120F. (It's not like a cookie, which ...


13

Pie and tart are regional (North American versus Western European) terms for essentially the same thing. Some will argue that the pans make the difference (see below), but I don't buy that story. There are some stylistic differences that appear quite often, but nothing that makes them truly different things: Pies tend to be deeper, and have more filling ...


13

Yes, they turn out just fine. As with any pie pan, if it isn't the pan you use every single time, you need to be aware that the surface on the bottom of the pan, and the material it is made of, will be a factors in the browning rate and cooking time of your pie, so keep alert. Even expensive high quality pans will behave differently from each other in the ...


11

Frankly, I'd be too lazy to fiddle with a "separating wall" shell - partly because unless very well supported its likely to collapse during blind baking anyway. My tool of choice would be a small cake ring or, in a pinch, a strip of aluminum foil, folded a few times and shaped into a circle. Place the ring on the prebaked shell, pour the fillings into the ...


10

In November 2007 a recipe was published in Cooks Illustrated for a Foolproof Pie dough with vodka. That recipe was created by J. Kenji Lopez-Alt who was one of the chefs on America's Test Kitchen and writer for Cooks Illustrated. He has an article about the recipe here http://sweets.seriouseats.com/2011/07/the-food-lab-the-science-of-pie-how-to-make-pie-...


9

I may not get a vote for this (hell, possibly a downvote), but.... Can't you just buy some bamboo steamer baskets from a chinese grocery and figure a way to stabilize them while they are stacked together? They are available in many sizes, and I am sure this little hack would work just fine. Also, having checked google, there are very few inexpensive ...


9

While many bread and pastry products do depend critically on the formation and management of gluten from wheat flours, this is not universally true. Some types of pastry have structure dependent more on the starch networks which is the other major component of wheat flours; the texture and properties of these pastries is often dependent on the gross ...


8

It seems to me, that a quality planar grater is the best solution. The Spin Zester is way too expensive for a home kitchen. I can recommend this fine micro plane grater for zesting:


8

From On Food and Cooking: Acidity in the dough - as from a sourdough culture - weakens the gluten network by increasing the number of positively charged amino acids along the protein chains, and increasing the repulsive force between chains. And weaker gluten structure is definitely a good thing for pastry doughs! From the same source: [Eggs] ...


8

I have been a baker for over 30 years and made many pork pies in that time,the above answers stating that the jelly acts as a preservative and stops the meat drying out are correct, but also the jelly when added at the correct time, roughly 20 minutes half an hour after baking, absorb the pork juices that would otherwise soak into the pastry which would make ...


8

The trick to incorporating olive oil into your crust is to freeze it first until it's opaque and congealed, "like the consistency of slightly melted sorbet." From the recipe for an olive oil double crust; it has a "surprisingly neutral taste... [and by freezing it] helps the fat blend into the dough in little pockets, creating the flakiness you crave (...


8

With great skill, a true artist could do what you describe with Thai/Vietnamese rice paper, the dinner plate sized, extra thin ones, like for Fresh Spring Rolls. I will never apply for the job, I promise.


8

I respect Jolenealaska's creative thought, but nothing truly resembling pastry is going to be translucent or transparent unless it is exceedingly thin. The structure alone will refract light, making the product opaque in the same way snow is opaque even though individual water crystals are fairly transparent, if they don't have air inclusions. This is ...


8

For apple, specifically, I tend to add a very thin layer of quick oats to the bottom of the pie filler to soak up any excess moisture. But nothing else really stands out in my recipe if I were to freeze it. My big thing is to use something that can handle the temperature change from freezer to oven (such as pyrex), and help it by giving it a smooth ...


7

I've done this both ways and prefer to freeze my fruit pies before I bake them. You have to bake them longer (20 min to 1/2 hour) and will need to use foil to be sure the crust doesn't come out too dark. No soggy crust this way.


7

The reason to par-bake your pie shell is because it would not cook through in the same time that the filling does. So it depends on what type of filling you are going to use. For example, if you are using a traditional short crust with a cream (custard) filling, the custard will probably cook faster than the crust would, so you would want to par-bake the ...


7

Sticking could be because the dough is either too warm or too wet. So it's possible you're not letting it chill fully. It's also possible the dough's too wet because you added too much water in order to get it to come together. I suppose it's also possible that your definition of a generous amount of flour isn't actually very generous, and you're letting ...


7

Drain them first. Your concerns are spot-on, and if you measured and then drained them, you would end up with less than 1 cup of yams. Generally, you can tell be cause the recipe called for 1 cup of drained yams, not 1 cup of yams in their sauce. Drain them, but double check that you won't need the liquid for anything later on in the recipe... That's a ...


7

Any kind of crust that doesn't use cold fat could be made with brown butter easily. You can make crust by melting butter (with water and oil) then adding flour, and it's flaky - though not exactly the same texture as you get with cold fat. So just do that, except brown the butter first. Or you could brown the butter, cool it til solid, and make a crust with ...


7

I'd be afraid of the sugar caramelizing and burning on the bottom with the direct and increased heat from the glass or metal pan you are baking in, combined with any trapped moisture coming off of the dough, you will likely end up with a burnt caramel on the bottom, trapping your pie in the pan. [long story short, it depends on the moisture of the dough, the ...


7

Absolutely not. As the other poster said but I will say with no "I think", I will say I know it will ruin the pastry. You will end up with a gummy crust that will never give you the flaky texture that pie doughs are famous for. It would probably also leave you with a somewhat dry filling as much of the liquid would then be in the crust.


6

I have this recipe on my short list to try: http://smittenkitchen.com/2008/04/shaker-lemon-pie/ Few things I've noticed in her recipe and my own experience with pies containing whole lemons. The meyer lemons as she notes make a huge difference. Mind you their growing season is short and they are not available everywhere. If you have access to them, then ...


6

If you want the least obtrusive flavor, the best you can go with is thickened water. While you can probably prepare sheets with the right hydrocolloid and lots of care and plastic foil, I would suggest choosing a thickener which thickens on cooling, and pouring the warm mixture over the pie. Arrowroot starch is frequently used in this role on fruit pies, I ...


6

Foil is the way to go, combined with not too fierce a heat. You want to cook at about 160°C (320°F) until the centre of the pie is piping hot. To lower the chances of burning, portion the pie prior to reheating. That way the centre will get hot more quickly. Reheating more than once is generally not a good idea for safety reasons. You can however portion ...


6

What you are looking for is typically considered a kitchen mistake: Overkneading. Not-so gentle handling of the dough and some kneading plus a bit more eggs or a dash of milk will add density. There is actually one special use case where bakers go for that more elastic and less crumbly dough: Cornish Pasties Straight from the Cornish Pasty Association, ...


6

Normally, pies are done with pie crusts, and they do have the crust types you describe. But you can certainly add pie filling to some other type of crust and enjoy the result, if that's what you prefer. Typical doughs used for crusts would be: millefeuille dough is the most common variant, sometimes also seen as direct substitution for people who don't ...


6

I don't know what it is, but I can tell you it is neither the ratio nor the temperature. I needed dinner anyway, so I made a small experiment. I made half a batch of crust using the ratios from your recipe, and baked it in three small tartalette pans. I used butter so soft that I had to spoon it out, I couldn't cut it (it sits on the counter as a rule). ...


6

Really, the difference is the process -- full sheets of butter results in layers of the dough which allows it to puff up. But it's a lot of work for a crust that's going to just be bogged down toppings. And if it's too flaky, it has no structural integrity -- it breaks apart as you're trying to eat it, making it pretty useless as a crust. That's part of ...


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