35

Although it doesn't explicitly say so, that's allergy information. It's just been processed in a place that also (potentially) processes those things, so it potentially contains a trace amount, which could be bad if you have a really sensitive allergy. It won't contain enough of those things to matter for any other purpose. Often labels like that are ...


20

It depends on where you cut it - if you are taking off the majority of leaves, but leaving the "fruit" intact, then it should be fine. If you are actually cutting into the fruit, then it will affect how well/long it keeps and how it matures. Incidentally - it is much better for flavour development to keep fruit like this outside the refrigerator. Also, if ...


15

As the instructions on the box say, you shouldn't put fresh pineapple (or kiwi-fruit) in the Jell-O. Apparently pineapple has an enzyme called bromelain that breaks up the gelatin into its component amino acids. You can use canned pineapple instead as the pineapple is cooked during the canning process and this denatures the bromelain.


9

Human skin contains oils which aid in blocking out the absorption of chemicals which would harm or irritate the skin. Those oils contain proteins. Pineapple contains a chemical compound called bromelain which has the ability to break down these proteins. This is bad, because it can then act on the skin itself (which is also comprised of protein molecules). ...


6

Pineapples contain a substance called bromelain. It is a protease, which means it breaks down protein. It can therefore slightly damage the cells of your mouth, causing the irritation you describe. It has a culinary use as a meat tenderiser. Bromelain is primarily concentrated in the stem of the pineapple but is found throughout the fruit. There is no way ...


6

Pineapple contains Bromelain, which is "one of the most popular proteases to use for meat tenderizing." Since it's sold as a meat tenderizer, I'd say it really just depends on how long you marinate with it -- it's possible to over-tenderize something. This warns about over marinating, and mentions recommended times: The same process that tenderizes ...


6

Based on my experiences with sweet-and-sour asian dishes, I'd say good or even okay mango would work just as well, if not be an improvement. (I find canned pineapple or pineapple juice to be cloying or bland compared to fresh, and generally like mango better in savoury foods.) If you're going to puree / juice, and not eat it as-is, you can "fix" it not being ...


6

Pineapple brings a touch of acidity, sweetness, and general fruitiness. I am going to assume you would have been using canned pineapple, so the enzymatic action is not really a factor (and it would be stopped as part of the cooking process). It is also hearty enough in texture to stand up to the baking. For the juice, I would recommend basic orange juice, ...


6

Kiwi. Don't knock it until you try it. It will have a similar acidity and texture to pineapple. Use ripe kiwi and maybe a touch extra lime juice!


5

From the description of how this beverage is made, it is not fermented. Four hours, at refrigerator temperature, and without any inoculation from an active bacterial culture simply will not cause any significant amount of fermentation. Instead, what is happening is that the enzyme bromelin and acid present in pineapple is curdling the milk proteins, ...


5

According to Dole and Cooking for Engineers (which has an excellent article on a variety of fruits) pineapples do not ripen after picking but do change color. So it will be just as sweet when it is green and fresh as when it sat and turned yellow.


4

If this was processed at the store then there's a pretty good chance they process everything in close quarters where there is a reasonable chance it was packaged alongside some of the other store-packaged products that could contain some of these other things. I definitely would not expect fresh pineapple to include shellfish.


4

I cut it into pieces, put it on a cookie sheet, and put it in the freezer of my refrigerator. When it is solid, I put it in bags (1/4 of the pineapple in each) and vacuum seal it. This goes into my chest freezer to enjoy later. If pineapples are a dollar apiece, it only makes sense to freeze them. The cores do make a great ice cream topping if you dice them ...


4

Clearly, the Blendtec, "will it blend" videos, are a marketing tool designed to illustrate the power of the product, as opposed to illustrating recipes for delicious smoothies. Is it safe to drink? There is nothing here: http://www.coconutresearchcenter.org/ that I have been able to find, which deems the "woody part" inedible or unsafe. So, strictly ...


4

From the manufacturer’s website: The pineapple flavor is most popular at Disney Parks, but a total of 6 bold, refreshing fruit flavors are available for purchase Pineapple, Orange, Strawberry, Raspberry, Mango and Lemon.


3

If you want to separate while retaining shape of individual pieces, freeze then pry. May cause small change in texture upon thawing


3

You can't. This is caused by an irreversible chemical reaction. The bitterness is there to stay. If it is just a tad too much for you, you can try diluting: make more pudding and mix. But if it is the strong bitterness I know from mixing mix and fruit enzymes, that won't help either.


3

Update: After reading a bit on this, (and also fully reading the question) I found that there have been papers written on the effects of acid baths on meat tenderness as well as enzyme treatment: Acid: http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1010&context=animalscidiss Enzyme: http://www.brainromania.ro/uploads/papers/effect-of-...


3

Umami is the result of glutamic acid (ions) getting in touch with the tongue. Glutamic acid in fish sauce is the result of a fermentation process, which involves bacteria doing the work of breaking down fish components. Glutamic acid easily dissolves in water though. This is after all, how it was detected millennia ago and centuries ago verified by creating ...


3

If this recipe from Fine Cooking is typical, it looks like pineapple is as much garnish as flavor. The things it adds to the punch are: Fruitiness with a complex floral quality A somewhat tropical feeling Some acidity I would suggest trying instead some mango, with extra lemon juice to compensate for the acidity. Another choice might be really nice red ...


3

Lot of people are talking about the acid in the pineapple. That's irrelevant in this case: pineapple runs around ph 3.5, and most soda runs ph 3 or less (coke runs around 2.5!). Additionally, a ham will be so heavily processed that the usual "It'll help tenderize the meat!" bit won't apply either. So really, it's a question of flavour, and that opens the ...


3

All the other answers say "Step 1 - peel the pineapple." I don't do that. Instead, I make what our family calls "boats". In addition to being a pretty presentation, it's a way less messy way to handle the fruit; you're not wrestling with a peeled and juicy pineapple and you lose way less juice. We cut pineapple this way even when we intend to toss the chunks ...


2

You can use the core and skin (wash the pineapple before you cut it up) to make a great tea - put pieces of skin and core into a medium size sauce pan, add a few slices of fresh ginger, cover with water, simmer an hour and then let sit until it cools. Remove all the solid pieces, pour the liquid into a container. Delicious as a cold drink or heated as a tea -...


2

There are different characteristics in fruit that can cause them to complement savory dishes. The reason why adding a dash of citrus to savory dishes is so common is that a bit of acidity can bring out other flavors in a dish and make it taste "brighter". Some chefs also use vinegars for this. Other fruits are used to play off of specific flavors. For ...


2

Pinapple + gelatin should raise red flags. Pineapple contains bromelain, a protease enzyme similar to papain in papayas. This enzyme when active will prevent gelatin from gelling. Heat will deactivate that enzyme. Canned pineapple is usually cooked enough that it isn't a problem. If you are using fresh pineapple (or suspect your canned pineapple wasn't ...


2

Substitute with mango or papaya juice. It will not taste the same, but it will still have the exotic flavor.


2

Your pineapple in a salsa is going to add some sweetness, a lot of acidity, and crisp chunks that will be important to the texture. While other tropical fruits would be have the sweetness and interesting flavor, I can't think of anything that adds the acidity and texture. When ripe, mango and guava are quite soft and although there are delicious mango ...


2

If there is really no way to delicately take off the moulds, I'd suggest feezing them. Then once they've hardened, heat up the mould and try to push the tarts out/bang the mould on a hard (not fragile...) surface. They'll be hard enough so you can apply more force without breaking. As a last resort... :) Also, removing them right out of the oven might not ...


2

Haha, that's hilarious. I suspect it's a catch-all legal disclaimer. Put "may spawn bank-robbing zombies" on all your food labels and no one can ever sue you when your zombies rob their bank accounts. It's really frustrating for people with food allergies: They have to avoid all foods with half-assed legal disclaimers instead of just foods that to ...


2

Mango, specifically green mango. You'll get a similar texture, some tartness, and it is already a widely used thing in salsas. You could easily pick how tart you want it by switching to s slightly riper Mango. https://www.google.com/search?q=green+mango+strawberry+salsa&oq=green+mango+strawberry+salsa&aqs=chrome..69i57j33.4770j0j7&sourceid=...


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