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14

The crucial ingredient is water - which turns into steam in a very hot oven. Let me explain based on a standard pita bread process. A comparatively simple dough (flour, water, salt, yeast) is kneaded, shaped into balls and left to rise. Before baking, the balls are rolled out in thin circles or ovals and baked on a hot surface, either a baking stone in an ...


14

The magic word is "water" - the dough needs sufficient moisture to stay moist while it expands to one big pocket and enough to generate the steam to make that pocket. Most people when doing doughs make them too dry because they're easier to work with. As the dough rests, it will pull together more. Ideally make your doughs for this kind of bread slightly ...


8

You need a temperature of at least 250°C (480°F) to get a real good steam puff inside the bread the moment it goes in oven. It is the initial rush of heat that cooks just the outside layer, and also makes steam inside which forces open the bread and makes a pocket. Once the bread is partially cooked through, you wont get a single clean pocket Traditional ...


6

Pita bread is a small "pocket" bread, they are not really designed for rolling. You normally slice the pocket open, and just stuff it. Like this Some bakeries make large or jumbo pita bread, that are generally not useful as pocket breads. These can be folded into a cone by taking the left and right sides and pulling together making a cone shape, then wrap ...


5

Tweaking your technique, rather than pan choice, may help a bit - people often use whatever is to hand to make recipes, and what you have is what you have as far as pans go. I've used the same techniques on a a cast iron thaava and stainless steel griddle, and it was workable on each of them, for what it's worth. I usually don't find using a lot of oil ...


4

The answer is almost certainly yes. The almost is because I haven't made pita bread this way - but I have seen chapati made on a skillet, and under the right conditions it will puff up, even into one big pocket - so pan cooking doesn't specifically preclude that kind of development. Beyond the need for it to puff up into the pocket, I don't imagine pan-...


4

To add one more tip to the excellent advice of both rfusca and Laura: How you roll it out does matter. After resting the dough, you should pull off balls an roll them out smoothly, from the center, in a few quick rolls. Three issues will rolling out will prevent pitas from pocketing well: If you allow the dough to fold over at all while rolling out If ...


4

The thing that makes bread chewy is gluten. The easiest way to make chewier bread would probably be to use flour with a higher gluten content. You've said you don't want to "add gluten" so I'll assume that option is not on the table. For the same reason, I'll assume that replacing some of the whole wheat flour with white flour (which has a higher gluten ...


3

My tortilla griddles are 14-16 gauge mild steel, made in Mexico, and purchased at the local Mexican grocery for ~$12.00 each. Each rectangular griddle covers two burners, so workflow is 4 tortillas at a time. There's no need for stainless, cast iron, a nonstick coating, or even oil. If you get the masa consistency right, the tortillas won't stick. Use a thin ...


2

I do this all the time; I keep dough in the fridge and can turn it into a pita in five minutes. My preferred way of doing it is to preheat a cast iron pan (which I do as I roll out the dough), put in the round of dough, and then slide it under the broiler. Heating it from both sides ensures perfect results every time. I have had a bit less success doing it ...


1

First off, I'd recommend not refrigerating pita if you don't have to. It tends to get state quickly. Pita should be safe at room temperature for several days. If you're keeping your pita longer than that, you should freeze most of them. Leave them to defrost on the counter before you intend to use it (it will take a few hours to defrost, and will be good for ...


1

Uneven rolling of pitas can usually cause this problem. Make sure you shape even with roll pin & keep it half centimetre thick!


1

I think the issue is that flatbreads are a single layer whereas pita and similar pan breads (there is an Indian version as well [paratha]) develop a pocket in between the layers (usually due to trapped steam). For pan breads, I've noticed the amount of heat is very important. Too much and it burns and too little and you don't get the pocket/lift. In this ...


1

The reason behind getting some pitas puffy and others not as you said is 1) enough water and 2) heat. You need an oven that produces higher temperature than regular ovens such as the portable ones they use in the Arab world. Or (TOG) ovens with 30 liters capacity and power not less than 1500 watts and bypass the thermostat (as I did in my house). With ...


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