54

I would rinse well with clear water. Allow to dry thoroughly, and then use as normal. There is a small chance that your pizza stone will impart a soap flavor to your pizza, but I would say that it is worth a couple of pizza cooks to determine if there is a long term problem. It's really not that much of a risk.


22

By rinsing, you can only remove stuff from the surface and slightly below. You need to remove molecules which sit in the pores of the stone. Chemically, you are working against diffusion and adhesion. By washing with soap, you have deposited a number of molecules onto the stone surface, these have diffused into the numerous pores of the solid. Now, these ...


19

To understand what's happening here, we should first have a look at what a pizza stone does. A pizza stone is made from a semi- permeable material with a high thermal capacity, or, plainly put, can store heat and soak up humidity. This means it ensures constant heat at the bottom, plus it buffers the wetness of the dough, giving your pizza a crisp, yet ...


15

I agree with you and don't do it either. Rather, like you, I put some cornmeal or semolina on the peel, upon which I construct my pizza. This, of course, allows the pizza to slid off and onto the steel. Clearly, some of the cornmeal or semolina winds up on the steel itself, but I don't toss it on intentionally. Never had sticking issues. I use a very ...


12

Rinse it thoroughly and just cook some dough on it to throw away (instead of a full pizza with all ingredients). I don't believe the soap will be that resilient to withstand rinse+heat+food on it. It is not designed for that.


10

Your aluminum pan is allowing moisture to escape from the bottom and the top, whereas the stone does not, so the stone will have more rise. To use a stone, after much trial and error, I have to roll that dough out super thin, like 3-4 mm, prebake in the hot oven for 4-5 minutes, pull it out, add the toppings, then finish for another 6-7 minutes. Also, ...


8

A pizza stone in a normal oven will only get the maximum temperature of the oven (probably not more than 280 ºC / 530 ºF). A specific pizza oven will gett hotter (the one you linked gets 390 ºC / 735 ºF and, indeed has a stone inside). If you want to get Italian style pizzas, go for the pizza oven. They need that high temperature in order to be ready in (...


6

One element not emphasized enough in previous answers is frequent shaking of the peel while making the pizza, especially with wet dough. Using more cornmeal or semolina (or flour) is important, but if it's not spread evenly, wet dough will eventually start to stick in places. With a relatively dry dough, this may not be necessary. But if you're using a ...


6

I'd use parchment paper. Foil might work, but it's not actually that great a nonstick baking material. Parchment paper is pretty much designed for that, though. The purpose of the stone is to hold a lot of heat. Parchment doesn't "void" that purpose at all. I've baked plenty of pizza and bread on a stone with parchment, and it works great. There's no need ...


6

Short answer: No. Long answer: this could probably be made to work, but only for a short time. At some point, and probably within a few uses, the rapid heat cycling from the fire would cause the pizza stone to crack. Pizza stones are made from corderite or clay, sometimes with grog. This offers a smoother surface than firebrick, but that smooth surface ...


5

The linked question in comments makes some general points about dedicated pizza ovens. However, to address the final question about temperature differences, the general answer is that it depends on the style of pizza you'd prefer to make and the dough/topping characteristics. Some doughs and pizza styles are designed to be cooked at lower temperatures for ...


5

Just thought of a couple other wacky thoughts that exceeded comment status... ATK also had a recommendation to preheat the stone and bake pizza on a higher rack near the top of the oven. Probably marginally hotter there. They went one extra step in preheating: just before applying the pizza, they turned the oven to broil for an additional shot of intense ...


5

Placing a pizza stone directly on a burner will likely lead to cracking. If you are limited to stove-top cooking, there are two routes that you might use to make pizza. First option, steal some of the techniques used for making grilled pizza: Preheat a large skillet medium-high with its lid in place. Cook the crust on one side, flip it over, then place the ...


5

In a small toaster oven, using a pizza stone is likely to be a tradeoff: Toasting -- counter-productive, because it will shield the bottom of the bread (or other item) from the direct radiative heat from the bottom elements; you would want to remove the stone for this use. Broiling (or as it is called in the British parlance if I understand correctly, ...


5

It won't suffer much from having a millimeter or two of material removed in one area, so I'd just go ahead with the Dremel and grind it down to clean stone rather than resorting to chemicals that may or may not work and may or may not impregnate the stone. There's no substance made short of diamonds that can resist a grinding wheel. Worst case is you end ...


5

Before IR thermometers were common, you'd toss a little flour or semolina on the (wood fired) oven deck and see how quickly it browned, as a way of gauging the temperature. I'd say doing it in a modern oven is just a case of cargo-cult baking.


5

The stone should work just as well. And you'd presumably put the pyrex dish on a preheated oven shelf without worrying. That would give more thermal stress because some parts of the dish would be heated much more than others. Of course there are no guarantees. And (domestic) pyrex literally isn't what it used to be at least in some countries.


4

Silkscreening ink is made to withstand scratching. So I wouldn't go the dremel route. The first I would try to do is to transfer it again somewhere else, to something more porous/sticky than the pizza stone. The best thing would probably be blotting paper, if you can get it, but if not, try other types of non-glossy paper. Heat the stone again, then put ...


4

If your experience is anything like mine the pizza stone won't survive long enough to bother maintaining it. Maybe I need to find a thicker stone, but the three we've bought so far have all cracked through normal (even light) use. That said, if your pizza stone is worth the effort, I'd recommend a "burn it off" approach vs an orbital sander.


4

How about just making sure it's very well floured on the bottom? I use a very ample dusting of cornmeal on my stone, and really only the cornmeal that touches the dough actually sticks to the dough -- the rest stays on the stone, and I brush it into the trash after the oven has cooled.


4

Assemble the pizza on a cornmeal-dusted pizza peel (large flat handled tray). You need enough cornmeal to ensure that the pizza can slide off the peel and onto the stone. If the pizza slides freely on the peel, I have found it does not stick to a pizza stone/steel. If the pizza sticks to the peel, it can be a mess trying to transfer to the stone. You may ...


4

If you have a self cleaning oven, run the pizza stone though a cleaning cycle in the oven. The oven will heat up slowly enough to not cause thermal stress in heating. The oven locks for hours to allow for a long cool down cycle to avoid thermal stress when cooling. The stone was manufactured at much higher temperatures than you'll get in an oven. Then I'd ...


4

Possible problems: You have too little water in the dough (you said that it felt OK, though) You baked it for too long at too low a temperature (likely). You let it proof for too long or too high a temperature (sounds like this may not be the case if you followed the directions and had it in the fridge). You kneaded it too much (likely). I'd suggest ...


3

The pizza stone, used properly, will work far better. The heat stored in the stone will help brown and crisp the bottom crust. The perforated pan just allows some better air circulation into the bottom, which has little effect. Its only true value is that it is fairly dark, and will therefore absorb the radiant heat of the oven better than a shiny pan ...


3

Do you have a BBQ? Place the pizza stone in there (latex-side down), close the lid, and turn it up to full blast (toss some foil-wrapped potatoes or something there while you're at it). An episode of Pitmasters later, and you'll likely have burned off most of the residue without risk of melting it further into the surface. Don't open it until completely ...


3

I cook a lot of pizza. The biggest issue is that you want browning and leopards spots, but a really short period (under 2 minutes) so that the inside is still moist and fluffy on the cornicione. I've had luck with three things in my gas oven: A long, long rise on the dough - a couple of days cold in the fridge. Supposedly what this does is convert more of ...


3

Having 2 stones/steels in the oven is totally workable, the top one would cook a bit faster than the bottom one but that's not a dealbreaker. 2 steels will take longer to get up to temperature than one, whether an hour is enough in your oven is not something I could say. I would suggest you get an infrared thermometer so you can take measurements and know ...


3

Stephie's point about the stone's capability to disperse humidity from the dough is probably the most important. Additionally, I'd suspect that the foil prevents the stone from getting up to sufficient temperature during pre-heating: aluminium is a good reflector, not only of visible light but also of thermal radiation. So by wrapping the stone in foil, you ...


3

For anyone interested: I ended up scraping the stone with a butter knife and some steel wool, removing all visible plastic, after which I put it in the oven and heated it up to about 275°C. After about an hour it stopped fuming, and from what I can tell there was not much left on it, although it was still kind of black, but not as black as it was when I put ...


3

The most common problem is that your consumer oven is not as hot as a professional stone oven. Pizza stones are created to replicate this effect, but there's no way to really achieve the same result if you cannot heat your stone to the same temperature as a professional pizza oven. My advice to get better results is: Preheat your oven to the highest ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible