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79

The piece of cardboard is a microwave browning element. Ordinarily, most of the heating energy in a microwave is absorbed by water in the food. The result is similar to steaming. The material on the cardboard is designed to absorb microwave radiation and convert it into heat, attaining a higher temperature than boiling water would reach, to allow the bottom ...


60

A lot of it depends on the type of pizza you make. Where I worked we did thin crust pizza, and these were the reasons we tossed: Speed. Trying to roll or pat out a 17 inch pizza would be very time consuming. Consistency. Was easier to make the crust a consistent size and shape. Space. Rolling or patting a person needs the table space 100% of the time. ...


46

Why pizza/wood ovens, but not BBQ/smoker? Fire is not fundamentally a problem indoors; there are certainly safe ways to do it, like fireplaces. The things that make fire dangerous are lack of containment and lack of ventilation coupled with significant size. If it's at all uncontained, it's a fire hazard, and if there's not enough ventilation then you can ...


34

Those who favor throwing pizza argue that it is the best way to stretch and shape the dough without risking a puncture or tear. Some claim this extra exposure to the air helps the dough retain moisture, while drying the surface. This improves the crust. ...and of course, there is the show. On the other hand, simply shaping dough on a floured surface ...


34

Possible causes of soggy calzones and their fixes. The oven is too hot. It seems counter-intuitive, but this browns the crust to golden perfection before the internal temp of the stuffing reaches an ideal point. It won't get hot enough for long enough to steam out the sauce and ingredients. Cook at a lower temp for longer and broil to perfection if needed. ...


34

Do not do this. Marble is, compared with ceramic brick or lava stones, extremely vulnerable to thermal shock. Your "bricks" will almost certainly crack within a few uses, and might even shatter dramatically.


30

Gluten is what makes a dough stick together and have structure. Coconut flour has no gluten, so the resulting dough will be a crumbly mess. Intentionally gluten free recipes usually contain any number of special additives to compensate for the lack of gluten.


30

I cast fresh basil leaves immediately after removing the pizza from the oven. I have found that cooking them with the pizza tends to reduce some (a lot) of the basil scent and flavour. For dried basil, I can't say as I don't use it.


28

The book is correct, for two reasons: Wood-fired pizza ovens are not smokey, instead having very good draft in order to allow maximum hot fire burning. A pizza is in a Neapolitan pizza oven for 60-100 seconds, which is not enough time for something to absorb smoke flavors, even if the oven were smokey. The reason to use a wood-burning oven for your pizza ...


28

America's Test Kitchen did tests of pizza stones, and one was actually a set of bricks. They found no problems from the seams ... which makes sense, considering that brick ovens would've been made from bricks, not large slabs of stone. What I'd be concerned with is that you're talking about marble. It's not the most dense of stones, which means it won't ...


21

I think you will be disappointed. While a fantastic protein source, cricket flour does not contain the gluten proteins that make bread what it is. Therefore, bread made with cricket flour must get its structure somewhere else. The majority of recipes I can find are quickbreads which get their structure from added eggs blown up with baking soda. Dense and ...


20

I can understand your confusion, but this is assuredly not a dessert pizza. The white circles of sauce, while they look like icing in appearance, are actually Ranch Dressing. For comparison, here is a pizza that someone made themselves on Reddit. While I wouldn't say it is common to put ranch on pizza, it is definitely something that people do, for better or ...


20

Well... First of all, no. As alluded to in a comment, as one gets older, one's digestive system tends to be less accepting of what one puts in it. Nevertheless, "the dose makes the poison". You probably can't eat an inch-deep layer of jalapeños on your pizza anymore, but that doesn't mean you can't have an "explosion of taste". For one ...


19

There are plenty of fermentable sugars in the flours commonly used in pizza making. Additional sugar is completely unnecessary.


18

You can use small amounts of cheddar mixed with the other cheeses. But you'd be disappointed in the results if you tried to use it as the main or only cheese on the pizza. Cheddar cheese doesn't tolerate sustained, high heat as well as some other cheeses. It can scorch, which tastes and smells bad, and/or the fats can separate from the solids as a yellowish ...


17

The Chef Pomodoro round peel you picture is described by the manufacturer as a ‘turning peel’. A turning peel is a must-have to easily rotate the pizza multiple times with precision. Taking that cue I checked a few more on Amazon and they were mostly described that way. A Turning Peel is specifically for rotating the pizza while it is cooking. I imagine ...


16

I agree with you and don't do it either. Rather, like you, I put some cornmeal or semolina on the peel, upon which I construct my pizza. This, of course, allows the pizza to slid off and onto the steel. Clearly, some of the cornmeal or semolina winds up on the steel itself, but I don't toss it on intentionally. Never had sticking issues. I use a very ...


15

Very, very few pizzas are made with butter. There is no way to make a universal statement, but butter is a rare. Olive oil would be more likely. Many pizza doughs are fat-free, including the traditional pizza di napoli; New York style generally contains olive oil. It is rare for any traditional toppings to contain butter. Some individual cooks might ...


14

Yes, preparing discs of dough ahead of time, separated by parchment, wax paper or clingfilm does work. The biggest risk is that the dough tends to dry out a bit, so keeping the whole mass wrapped up in clingfilm and possibly in wide closable containers may be worthwhile. I don't know how long it would take you to pre-portion 20 pizza doughs; I'm not super-...


12

The moisture that you're talking about really has nothing to do with draining it or wringing it out. When it's heated, the cell structure breaks down and the water in the cells is released. Since it's predominately water, that means you have a lot of moisture on your pizza to make your crust soggy. At the restaurant I used to work at we had two methods. If ...


12

The key here is that you said you’ve thawed the pizza. Frozen pizzas are designed to be baked from frozen. The instructions on the box should reflect this.


11

Absolutely not. There are a lot of tricks to get good thick (or thin) pizza with oven temperatures under 300C (572F). The people at Serious Eats have researched the problem at great length and with excellent results. Few home ovens reach 300C. I made this pizza last weekend using the recipe in the above link, my oven's top temperature is 274C (525F): ...


11

I have had a pizza with a drizzle of olive oil on top (in addition to some basil, pesto, and something else). As best I remember, it did not end up looking, feeling, or tasting particularly "oily", although it was visually apparent (olive-green lines). However, that was a high-end pizzeria; I've never seen oil on a delivered pizza, at least not any that was ...


11

I'm not sure what you mean by "common mozzarella." If you mean the dried out "low-moisture" stuff you find in the U.S., that's just not common in Italy. If your pizza actually had "mozzarella" on it, it was likely either actual mozzarella di bufala (from buffalo milk, the traditional version) or fior di latte (i.e., cow's milk mozzarella, which we'd call "...


11

Not really. Assuming that the pizza has been cooled down and stored properly (for which see here and here) then it most likely won't have developed a potentially harmful microbial load. Additionally, while reheating might kill off most of the microbes in the food (assuming that you reached and maintained a temperature sufficient for pasteurization, which isn'...


11

Please, Please, Please do not try to do indoor smoking without equipment made for it. It is Dangerous! DANGEROUS Devices that use open flame inside your house take advantage of a chimney to let the smoke out. Pizza ovens are just funky shaped fireplaces. In a fireplace, the hot fire causes the smoke and nasty gasses to rise up the chimney, drawing in ...


10

No, it's not worth the bother. Get a few cans of crushed tomatoes and simmer them slowly with whole garlic cloves and some chopped onion for a few hours until it's thickened (but not like paste). Season and you're good to go.


10

Let it cool a bit. Then eat. Added bonus: You don't sear the roof of your mouth.


10

Your aluminum pan is allowing moisture to escape from the bottom and the top, whereas the stone does not, so the stone will have more rise. To use a stone, after much trial and error, I have to roll that dough out super thin, like 3-4 mm, prebake in the hot oven for 4-5 minutes, pull it out, add the toppings, then finish for another 6-7 minutes. Also, ...


10

Don't use whole wheat flour if you want a strong or thin crust. The shards of bran in the whole wheat flour will cut the strands of gluten, weakening the crust, which prevents it from being stretched very thin. You can verify for yourself by performing the windowpane test.


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