Hot answers tagged

57

A lot of it depends on the type of pizza you make. Where I worked we did thin crust pizza, and these were the reasons we tossed: Speed. Trying to roll or pat out a 17 inch pizza would be very time consuming. Consistency. Was easier to make the crust a consistent size and shape. Space. Rolling or patting a person needs the table space 100% of the time. ...


45

Why pizza/wood ovens, but not BBQ/smoker? Fire is not fundamentally a problem indoors; there are certainly safe ways to do it, like fireplaces. The things that make fire dangerous are lack of containment and lack of ventilation coupled with significant size. If it's at all uncontained, it's a fire hazard, and if there's not enough ventilation then you can ...


36

I don't see anything in the question that is peculiar to pizza dough. Anything I answer will apply to any kind of yeast-risen, glutenous dough. The goal with any such dough is a well hydrated protein matrix that has been arranged in sheets that will trap the gas produced by yeast. If the yeast is dead it won't be able to produce gas and your bread will be ...


33

Those who favor throwing pizza argue that it is the best way to stretch and shape the dough without risking a puncture or tear. Some claim this extra exposure to the air helps the dough retain moisture, while drying the surface. This improves the crust. ...and of course, there is the show. On the other hand, simply shaping dough on a floured surface ...


29

Red pizza sauce is often (but not always) two things: Thicker. Thinner sauce will tend to run in the oven and also steam the pizza crust as it cooks - if loaded with toppings, otherwise thin is fine. Depending on the crust, the heat of the oven, the toppings above sauce, and how watery it is, this may not be needed. If you've just got some crushed ...


21

I think you will be disappointed. While a fantastic protein source, cricket flour does not contain the gluten proteins that make bread what it is. Therefore, bread made with cricket flour must get its structure somewhere else. The majority of recipes I can find are quickbreads which get their structure from added eggs blown up with baking soda. Dense and ...


18

What do we look in a pizza dough? There are many styles of pizza: Italian Vera Pizza Napoletana, Chicago style, ... All of them have something in common in their dough: it should be stretched without tearing, and shouldn't stretch back. Also, some recipes call for long fermentation times: 6, 9 or more hours at room temperature. With this you get a more ...


15

You can use small amounts of cheddar mixed with the other cheeses. But you'd be disappointed in the results if you tried to use it as the main or only cheese on the pizza. Cheddar cheese doesn't tolerate sustained, high heat as well as some other cheeses. It can scorch, which tastes and smells bad, and/or the fats can separate from the solids as a yellowish ...


14

Very, very few pizzas are made with butter. There is no way to make a universal statement, but butter is a rare. Olive oil would be more likely. Many pizza doughs are fat-free, including the traditional pizza di napoli; New York style generally contains olive oil. It is rare for any traditional toppings to contain butter. Some individual cooks might ...


13

I agree with you and don't do it either. Rather, like you, I put some cornmeal or semolina on the peel, upon which I construct my pizza. This, of course, allows the pizza to slid off and onto the steel. Clearly, some of the cornmeal or semolina winds up on the steel itself, but I don't toss it on intentionally. Never had sticking issues. I use a very ...


13

There are plenty of fermentable sugars in the flours commonly used in pizza making. Additional sugar is completely unnecessary.


12

White pizza sauce isn't nearly as defined as red sauce. It's largely whatever you want it to be. It's literally any sauce you top a pizza with that is white. It is often dairy based (cream or cheese added), but it could also be a thin parsnip puree. It may contain herbs, it may contain butter, its up to you. Again, thickness is up to you and whatever ...


12

Ideally, of course, you'd be baking your pizza on a baking stone, which you would heat to 500F for 1/2 hour before putting the pizza in the oven. However, you asked about baking a pizza in a metal pan. In general, you want to get as much radiant heat into the bottom crust as possible in order to make sure the crust is fully cooked and not soggy. This ...


12

The moisture that you're talking about really has nothing to do with draining it or wringing it out. When it's heated, the cell structure breaks down and the water in the cells is released. Since it's predominately water, that means you have a lot of moisture on your pizza to make your crust soggy. At the restaurant I used to work at we had two methods. If ...


11

Cook the chicken ahead of time. I doubt your pizza cooking time and your chicken cooking time will be a perfect match, and it is more likely than anything that your chicken would be undercooked. That would not be good for anyone. If you are worried about the chicken being dry on your pizza, you can try par-cooking the pieces instead of fully cooking them (...


11

Absolutely not. There are a lot of tricks to get good thick (or thin) pizza with oven temperatures under 300C (572F). The people at Serious Eats have researched the problem at great length and with excellent results. Few home ovens reach 300C. I made this pizza last weekend using the recipe in the above link, my oven's top temperature is 274C (525F): ...


11

I have had a pizza with a drizzle of olive oil on top (in addition to some basil, pesto, and something else). As best I remember, it did not end up looking, feeling, or tasting particularly "oily", although it was visually apparent (olive-green lines). However, that was a high-end pizzeria; I've never seen oil on a delivered pizza, at least not any that was ...


11

Yes, preparing discs of dough ahead of time, separated by parchment, wax paper or clingfilm does work. The biggest risk is that the dough tends to dry out a bit, so keeping the whole mass wrapped up in clingfilm and possibly in wide closable containers may be worthwhile. I don't know how long it would take you to pre-portion 20 pizza doughs; I'm not super-...


11

I'm not sure what you mean by "common mozzarella." If you mean the dried out "low-moisture" stuff you find in the U.S., that's just not common in Italy. If your pizza actually had "mozzarella" on it, it was likely either actual mozzarella di bufala (from buffalo milk, the traditional version) or fior di latte (i.e., cow's milk mozzarella, which we'd call "...


11

The key here is that you said you’ve thawed the pizza. Frozen pizzas are designed to be baked from frozen. The instructions on the box should reflect this.


10

I had this exact same problem for years. And it was all about letting the dough relax. I'd get beautiful crusts, but never EVER pass the windowpane test. I was so confused. Turns out, all I had to do was leave it alone for about 10 minutes, much less and I'd still run into issues. The window pane test is intended to show that enough gluten has been ...


10

When you ask about "pizza sauce" I'll have to assume you mean the tomato-based sauce that became the norm for just about all pizzas in North America since about 1955 when we crawled out of our meat & potato caves and started to try new things. (Thank you E.D. & J.C.) The reality is that there really isn't a "pizza" sauce. There is pizza and ...


10

The most important thing is for the stone to be hot. That generally means you need to set the oven to its highest setting, and then let it preheat for at least 30 minutes. I use a 1-inch thick paver from a hardware store, and I generally get my best pizzas when I set the oven to 500F and wait about 45 minutes before I put the pizza in. For a thin ...


10

I agree with baka that the stone must be really hot--as hot as your oven can go (and completely preheated). To prevent sogginess, you need to cook the underside of the pizza as quickly as possible, so getting that strong, direct heat on there helps. It also helps to use less sauce or a thicker sauce, and if possible, pre-cook or par-cook the vegetable ...


10

No, it's not worth the bother. Get a few cans of crushed tomatoes and simmer them slowly with whole garlic cloves and some chopped onion for a few hours until it's thickened (but not like paste). Season and you're good to go.


10

Let it cool a bit. Then eat. Added bonus: You don't sear the roof of your mouth.


10

Your aluminum pan is allowing moisture to escape from the bottom and the top, whereas the stone does not, so the stone will have more rise. To use a stone, after much trial and error, I have to roll that dough out super thin, like 3-4 mm, prebake in the hot oven for 4-5 minutes, pull it out, add the toppings, then finish for another 6-7 minutes. Also, ...


10

Not really. Assuming that the pizza has been cooled down and stored properly (for which see here and here) then it most likely won't have developed a potentially harmful microbial load. Additionally, while reheating might kill off most of the microbes in the food (assuming that you reached and maintained a temperature sufficient for pasteurization, which isn'...


10

Please, Please, Please do not try to do indoor smoking without equipment made for it. It is Dangerous! DANGEROUS Devices that use open flame inside your house take advantage of a chimney to let the smoke out. Pizza ovens are just funky shaped fireplaces. In a fireplace, the hot fire causes the smoke and nasty gasses to rise up the chimney, drawing in ...


9

One thing that's important to note when discussing American-style pizza cheese is that it's important that it be a very dry mozzarella. There are two very different cheeses named "mozzarella": in Europe, the predominant variety is what, under US law, is called "fresh mozzarella", which comes in a ball, either shrink-wrapped or packed in water. In the US, it'...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible