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29

Heston Blumenthal has brought his unique scientific approach to bear on this recently. The main pointers for a perfect poached egg are as follows: The egg must be fresh. A fresh egg has a thicker, more gel-like albumen. As it gets older, this becomes watery, and so just disperses throughout the water when you add it. To test if your egg is fresh, place it ...


18

The number one thing is having fresh eggs. Older eggs have a looser inner white and there's not much you can do to keep the yolk from hanging on to the side. Contrary to the other answer, I have not found that swirling the water helps the egg stay together, compared to dropping it in very carefully (the water should go into the cup before the egg comes out; ...


11

The only thing you did wrong was to try to poach an egg in oil, at least hot oil. Dropping an egg into really hot oil is going to cause all the water in the egg to turn to steam very quickly, hence the nuclear mutant effect you no doubt got. If you want to poach in oil then you need to keep the temperature way down. I don't see any reason you couldn't ...


10

Jamie Oliver has a method (around 2:53 in the video) that involves poaching the eggs wrapped in plastic. I've never tried this myself, but the gist from the video is: Tear off a roughly square piece of plastic wrap Line a bowl with it Lightly oil the plastic Crack the egg into the bowl Pull the corners of the plastic wrap together and gently twist it shut, ...


8

Acidify the water with lemon or white vinegar (balsamic vinegar would be a waste to use for this, plus would stain the eggs) to facilitate protein coaugulation. When the water is boiling, break the egg in a small dish, then create a whirpool by stirring the water just before putting the egg in. This will help to make the white coaugulate around the yolk. ...


8

The milk sugars will add a sweetness to the dish. Also, after the fish comes out, the milk can be reduced/thickened to make a bechemel sauce.


7

You could try the "Arzak" egg, made popular by Spanish chef Juan Mari Arzak. It is not difficult, but does require the extra step of wrapping. Line a ramekin with plastic wrap, leaving enough overhand to enclose an egg with extra to tie off. Brush with oil. Crack egg into plastic lined ramekin. Carefully bring the plastic end together, encasing the egg, ...


6

Found this link for you... The Art of Poaching Fish Milk - Milk is good for poaching flatfish, such as dover sole, turbot and halibut. Like a quality enamel, it makes the texture of the fish more resilient and adds an extra "shine" to chalky white fish.


5

Actually, hard boiling is one of the recommended uses for older eggs, since older eggs are much easier to peel. I'd highly recommend against using old eggs if you were going to whip the whites, for example, or any other heavy "structural" application. Quiche would probably be fine.


5

Just simmer water, and poach the egg. The vinegar is simply there to help coagulate the white. I never use vinegar for poaching eggs. You just have to try to be as careful as possible when setting the egg into the water. have the water at a bare simmer, not a rolling boil. These things will help to keep the white intact.


5

This method may not be practical if you want a lot of poached eggs but this is what I do. wait for the water to come to the boil turn down heat somewhat use a spoon to stir the water until a visible vortex forms in the middle of the pot gently pour in the egg in the vortex wait until done


4

Personally I don't like the whirlpool method as in my experience it doesn't work that well most of the time. I use a saucepan with an inverted bowl in the bottom to prevent the egg coming into contact with direct heat, but the most important factor is fresh eggs. As eggs age, the white gets more and more watery. Thus when you put an old egg in water to ...


4

The likely contributing factors are (and probably more than one, and perhaps all apply): Older, weaker red wine vinegar, which didn't sufficiently acidulate the water to denature the egg white proteins quickly, thus removing their ability to dissolve Older eggs, with weaker, looser whites that spread more easily in the poaching liquid, and thus dissolve ...


4

This will work from a safety standpoint, unfortunately, freezing alters the property of the yolk. So, you will likely not get the runny yolk that you would expect in a poached egg, it will be more solid, like a hard boiled egg. Why not poach your eggs for the week and store them in the refrigerator, then reheat each morning? According to The Food Lab you ...


4

I would say its a matter of personal preference. One method or the other doesn't mean your chicken will turn out jucier, either of those methods can dry chicken out if not done properly. For your application, just cook the chicken how ever you enjoy it the best whether its those methods listed, grilling, frying, etc. As long as you cook the meat properly ...


4

By far the most important factor in a nice poached egg is the freshness of the egg. Fresh eggs shouldn't need vinegar to help them set, but It can help with an older egg, whose white has started to go a bit runnier. Vinegar does leave a flavor, but if you're poaching your eggs ahead of time and putting them in iced water to stop them cooking, that does seem ...


3

Sugar stabilizes proteins and reduces foaming (salting in). I'm not sure how much sugar you'd need to add to your egg water to reduce dissipation and strand formation, but some protein structures are affected positively by sucrose concentrations below 30 grams per liter.


3

Some data: Egg whites start coagulating at 150F. Egg yolks start thickening at 150F and become solid at 158F or so. The danger zone for bacteria is between 40F and 130F. What this means is that your perfect poaching temperature is going to be somewhere around 150F to 155F depending on how firm you like your eggs. At these temperatures bacteria can't grow ...


3

You might try coddling them. Butter a ramekin or similar heatproof cup, crack in an egg, then cover with foil and place in a pan of near boiling water until the egg is done to your liking, usually around ten minutes. You can also try boiling the egg in its shell for 30 seconds or so before cracking and poaching it as usual. The initial boil sets the egg ...


3

Poaching is a gentle process - the milk isn't boiling so there is no risk of it burning or the like. It will of course not spoil in the sense of it going off, that's a totally different process. Fresh milk is better because, well, it's fresh. Powdered milk would probably work, but if you have fresh, use that.


3

Theoretically, there is no problem with your logic. In fact, during the early days of restaurant sous vide adoption, when chefs were using the same immersion circulators that scientists were using, it was not uncommon to poach fish directly in oil using an immersion circulator. Those original tools could handle that job. However, most home sous vide devices ...


2

What I generally do is use a slotted spoon to drain the runny parts of the white of, before putting it into the water. This goes well with the aforementioned method from Heston Blumenthal.


2

Heston Blumenthal seems to have a good way to do this and get "the perfect egg every time", and it actually looks pretty easy. Use a fresh egg. Fresh eggs have a firmer albumen which helps the poached egg form (fresh eggs sink in water, because an air bubble is produced over time) Avoid direct heat in the pan: Put a plate upside-down at the bottom Get the ...


2

Poaching is about cooking something gently, until just done. This is good for chicken breasts: white meat has very little fat and connective tissue, which makes it well-suited to this. It's at its most tender when it's not overcooked. Dark meat will be fine too. As with most other methods of cooking, it just needs to reach the appropriate temperature in the ...


2

Pursuing taste, some chefs aren't really concerned about wasting a couple cups of milk. Adding milk makes the fish tastes more tender and more "gentle" than just adding sugar. However, you don't really need that if you're not going for it or you think it's an absolute waste. In my opinion, the taste of some fish is rich enough. You can get milk-like soup ...


2

As stated above in various comments it is a complicated question. I do have some info. First read khymos I think that the formula they have answers the question :-) They have a answer in a graph but it is only displayed for a very small range of chicken eggs. This page in Norwegian gives you a online tool to manipulate the size of the egg and get the ...


2

In my experience, while vinegar will hold the whites together a bit, it can toughen the egg, and adds what I consider to be an unpleasant taste. If your concerned about keeping the whites from spreading and streaking, use a fine mesh tea-strainer to get rid of the excess moisture from the eggs. This will also help the egg white solidify faster without ...


2

well that qualifies as a ripple in your chef hat. (in the old days the number of ripples in the hat meant the number of different ways the chef could make eggs). Here are some tricks for poaching eggs [in water]: Use an 8-10" [non-stick] skillet filled to the brim and bring to boil and turn the heat to lowest. The idea is to prevent the egg from sinking ...


2

You can poach in any medium you'd like. You are only concerned with heating the egg enough to coagulate the whites and/or yolks if you want. Eggs poached in tomato sauce are amazing. The only caveats to poaching in other liquids other than water is the pH and temperature. Obviously you can't get water above the boil point without pressure so your not super ...


2

Poaching a foie gras torchon is not necessary. Essentially, the liver is a cured charcuterie before the poaching step would occur. From this Serious Eats method of preparation: To Cook or Not To Cook? At this stage, the most classical of recipes will have you poach your torchon in a bath of sub-simmering hot water for about 20 minutes, long enough ...


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