4

I'm pretty sure that no matter what you do, it's going to end up braising, so it doesn't really matter exactly what temperature you set it at. The manual does have suggestions for this: Start with 1 1/2 to 3 pounds of beef or pork... [various cuts] Preheat multi-cooker at 375˚. Brown roast in... [various oils] Add 2 cups... [liquid] Turn heat control down ...


3

Don't cook by time, cook it until it's done (you can slide a probe into all parts of the shoulder with practically zero resistance. That said, 16 hours for a 4.5 kg (10 pound) shoulder doesn't seem outrageous. In fact, at those cooking temperatures, I would be surprised if your pork was done cooking by then. Bear in mind, I am assuming that your intention is ...


3

Pork shoulder is extremely forgiving. You are looking for an outcome, not a time, and not an absolute temperature. Cook it until it is tender, which indicates the collagen is sufficiently converted to gelatin. That may or may not have happened at a particular temperature, because the conversion process is time dependent, and the rate is temperature ...


3

As moscafj pointed out, the old minutes-per-unit-weight guides were flawed, largely due to the fact that the rate at which the center of a piece of meat heats up is more related to how far it is from the surface than the mass of the whole piece of meat, and those two factors depend a lot on the shape of the meat; consider a long, flat hanger steak cut from ...


3

Cooking by minutes per pound is far less accurate than using a thermometer. The challenge with a pork shoulder is that it is made of of different muscles. So, timing could certainly depend on which you are cooking...and, when using the charcoal grill, obviously the cooker temperature is going to be a factor. So, get a good thermometer and rely on that. ...


2

I don't see a strong reason to wait for the meat to cool completely before vacuum sealing it. In fact, by waiting, you're likely to let more flavor and moisture escape unless you've already put it in a well-sealed container. The only reason to wait would be if you were vacuum sealing very large packages, which might take very long to cool down in the ...


2

For pulled pork, there is good reason to only use a small amount of liquid. Use only enough liquid to come nearly half way up the side of the pork. The pork that is sticking out of the liquid will brown, much like a sear. The mechanism is different, but result is the same. The exposed meat will develop color and that extra meaty flavor that gives good BBQ ...


2

Without question low and slow is best for pork shoulder roasts. Roasting the meat to at least an internal temp of 180 degrees is critical. Once this temp is reached, remove the roast from the oven, cover loosely with foil and rest until the in the internal temp reaches at least 190 degrees. Anyone that suggests a temp of lower than 190 degrees is not a ...


2

According to Modernist Cooking Made Easy (emphasis added): For medium rare cooked pork shoulder, the meat should be held at 135°F or 57.2°C, while medium cooked meat is done at 145°F or 62.8°C. If a traditional well done shoulder is desired, it should be cooked at 155°F or 68.3°C. No matter what temperature range is used, the pork shoulder should ...


2

Ideally you should cook to temperature and texture you are looking for you not time. Since size, composition, moisture levels, heating control of your cooking vessel all influence the cooking in ways you really can't account for. If you have you a temp sensor, just stick in the meat deepest part and cook to approximately 90-95C. 16 hours isn't crazy for ...


2

I have never done it, but I have seen a guy explaining how to do it and he cooked it for 9 hours in the oven at 110ºC, when it was done it looked pretty juicy and moist. He also said that he would cook it for longer periods, up to 18 hours, so your 16 hours at a lower temperature seems to be fine.


1

It can be done, but requires a bit more time. The trick is to cook it, then cool it, then heat it back up again: Cook the pork shoulder Drain the liquid, being careful not to poke at the meat too much Remove the crock from cooker, and let it cook down Place the crock in the fridge, and let chill overnight The next day you can slice the meat, then pour the ...


1

The lowest simmer is about 180-185F. That's about as low as you'd want to go. Theoretically, you could go lower (and you certainly could go lower for sous-vide), but significantly lower in the oven or on the stove leaves little margin of error for safety. You'd want to cook your shoulder to at least 160F because that's the temperature at which collagen ...


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