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37

I doubt that your meat is really greasy. If it is really overly fat, you will notice it when buying it, your meat will be marbled through and through. But it is difficult to get such meat nowadays at all, since it is rather expensive to produce. The mouthfeel you describe is more likely to come from the gelatine. When you make pulled pork in the pressure ...


31

Apple juice is good with pork. The frozen cans of concentrate are cheap and perfect for this use. Apple juice lacks the dark notes of cola. To get those I propose you add hoisin sauce. It is very sweet, a great mix with pork (I have some boneless ribs soaking in some right now awaiting the grill) and will lend the apple juice more of a dark sweet tone. ...


27

Throw it away, it's not worth risking health issues over such a cheap staple. While the flour was originally dry, the pork juice introduced moisture into it, providing a much better breeding ground for bacteria. Your concern should not be (just) the bacteria, but also the much hardier toxins that they produce--those could easily give you food poisoning, and ...


25

Meat is tough for two reasons: 1- An abundance of connective tissue. 2- When over cooked. In your case I'd say you probably have both problems. Cheap meat is tough meat. It is from older animals or well worked muscle groups. This means that it has been fortified with a lot of extra connective tissue. It also means it has a lot of flavor. The solution to #...


22

They say to cook until 190F because that's the temperature at which the stuff that actually makes your slow-roasted pork moist, the collagen, fat, etc. is breaking down and coating the meat. Less than that and you'll have all those bits still intact in your shoulder, which you don't want. ATK explains this in their footnote on the recipe: LOW OVEN ...


20

Whether or not it's a good idea is subjective, but the Chinese seem to break that rule a lot! For example, Northeastern Chinese sweet and sour pork (guō bāo ròu) is characterized by an intense ginger flavor. The Sichuan classic twice cooked pork (huí guō ròu) calls for boiling the pork with ginger. A common condiment for beef dishes/sauces is black bean ...


19

The bone structure is an excellent clue -- each of these three cuts have completely different bones -- and you should be able to learn to distinguish the muscle structures easily as well. (There's almost certainly a price difference, too -- I'd expect a shoulder steak to be the cheapest, followed by leg, then loin and rib.) I've made some quick structural ...


19

You can trim/remove some of the fat or use a leaner cut like a loin to achieve this before-hand After cooking pull the pieces of meat out before you shred them and set them aside. Then strain your juice and remove as much of the rendered fat as you can. It should have separated. Also chilling will cause the rendered fat to coagulate making it easier to ...


18

There used to be a good reason to add the jelly to the meat pie: food safety. In the time before refrigerators, it was hard to keep meat without some spoilage. But a slaughtered fully grown pig meant some hundred kilos of meat, and it wasn't eaten on a single day. Most of the bacteria which spoil meat need oxygen to proliferate. So once you pack the meat ...


14

The main function that soda adds in these recipes is as a flavored syrup that also has an acid. So make your own. Add your preferred sweetener to water with some form of acidulation (I prefer apple cider vinegar with pork) and a few spices and you will have something suitable to use.


13

The Hong Kong Centre for Food Safety offers the following information and advice: Use of Hydrogen Peroxide in Food Processing Because of its strong oxidising property, hydrogen peroxide is used as a bleaching agent in some foods such as wheat flour, edible oil, egg white etc. in countries like the US, Canada, Australia and New Zealand. It ...


13

If you have a blow torch or a brûlée torch, just burn the hairs off. If this is not an option, I've heard that you can use a normal safety razor. In this case I would definitely choose a razor without a lubricating strip along the top.


12

Whenever I see never I feel uneasy and want to try it anyway :) Beef + garlic works very well. It's often used in middle eastern and Japanese cuisine for example. Pork and ginger is a common combination in Chinese cooking.


12

Don't worry about the pork contaminating the chicken, but rather vice versa. A good rule of thumb with chicken is to treat it as a biohazardius contaminant. Because it is. Salmonella is present IN chicken meat, unlike other meats where you will only find microbes on the surface. Your marinade doesn't seem particularly inhospitable to pathogen growth, so ...


12

Rounding to the nearest 10C is more accurate than your thermostat probably is anyway (don't round up, round to the nearest). Conversion isn't your issue, your thermostat is much more likely your culprit. Use an oven thermometer, not your dial. And keep in mind that ovens hover above and below their set temperature by switching on and off. Use Google or ...


11

The jelly in British pork pies is added deliberately, after the rest of the pie is cooked, to help keep the meat moist. In good pies it is usually either ham or chicken stock which jellifies as it cools. It is entirely possible to make a pork pie and omit this step at the end, but the pie then needs to be eaten sooner before it dries out.


11

A Southerner will probably tell you that there is no type of BBQ sauce to go with this type of pulled pork because it's not actually real pulled pork... or real BBQ. Authentic pulled pork is smoked, and that comes with a completely different set of pairings. This is technically just braised, shredded pork. Which is not meant as a criticism, mind you - I ...


11

I learned a recipe for a chicken dish from my mother. Her recipe also called for cola to create a sticky and caramelised sauce. She taught me, however, that the cola could be replaced with fruit juice. Her preference was a mix of pineapple, mango, and orange juice. Shops where I live call this juice mix "tropical fruit" juice. It stands to reason, though, ...


9

Despite the currently accepted answer, there is no single best method to cook pork tenderloin. The main issue is getting it to a final internal temperature of about 145 F to 155 F (63 C to 68 C) depending on your preferences. If cooked to well done (above about 165 F, 74 C), it will be tough and rubbery as it has very little internal fat or collagen. The ...


9

There's really no such thing as 'sealing in juices' when it comes to meat. Skin-on chicken breast stays relatively moist because of the fat in the skin; because the skin is on top, it pretty much self-bastes. Broiling just crisps the skin afterwards and will do nothing moisture-wise. With pork chops, however, the fat is around the side and so will drip off ...


9

I suspect that this is because in Europe, the pig has been a fairly common household animal. For example, in the past in Poland, all families that didn't live in closely packed towns would have their own pigs. Some of the reasons for keeping pigs is that they don't need much room and can eat almost anything - you can easily feed them household scraps, or ...


9

Perfectly safe. From the Henning's Market FAQ: The shiny, greenish, rainbow like color on sliced ham is a sign of oxidation that occurs when the meat is exposed to the metal on a knife or slicer. The nitrate-modified iron content of the meat undergoes a chemical change that alters the hams pigmentation. This effect can also be seen in sliced beef, such ...


8

I have been a baker for over 30 years and made many pork pies in that time,the above answers stating that the jelly acts as a preservative and stops the meat drying out are correct, but also the jelly when added at the correct time, roughly 20 minutes half an hour after baking, absorb the pork juices that would otherwise soak into the pastry which would make ...


8

You can completely cook it the night before. Pulled pork will reheat quite well. Alternately, you can cook it completely that morning, and hold it for an hour or so before your guests arrive. It should braise or roast in no more than 3-4 hours, tops, which should allow you to cook it the same day. You can then hold it a while for service, if you don't ...


8

Good home-made stock is easy and cheap to make. All you need is an old stock pot (no lid needed, you want the water to evaporate), and a bunch of pork bones and connective tissue. The bones will add the pork flavor, while the connective tissue will break down into gelatin. The best way to get the pot is a thrift store (charity shop to UK types), and the ...


8

There's nothing wrong with your conversions, they were fine. What you may not have considered is: Convection versus non-convection ovens. When you see a recipe in F it's most likely from the US, and in the US convection ovens are rare. Convection ovens cook with more intensity than non-convection ovens as the fan blows hot air, so when using a recipe for a ...


8

Some of this has already been said briefly in comments and the previous answer, but since the question is interested specifically in chemical mechanisms, here are a few more details. The general process to think about first is diffusion. This is part of a general physical property of systems to move to a state of equilibrium. Suppose you had a container ...


8

It seems like you are primarily interested in reproducing the umami of the meat. Tofu does in fact have glutamic acids that will add to the umami; just make sure to thoroughly dry the tofu (extracting as much liquid as possible) before use. In addition, you can use minced mushrooms, as Stephie mentioned in the comments. You can also experiment with adding ...


8

In the UK you see lamb and chicken on "Indian" restaurant menus, but not beef or pork. I suspect that in the colonial era when the English wanted meat there were goats (near enough the same as sheep) and chickens because both are kept for food but not meat. So are cattle but they're special. There simply wouldn't have been a supply of pigs or the habit of ...


8

I wouldn't describe it as an "off taste", for me it is the tasty flavor of pork fat, commonly known as lard. But yes, it is certainly not taste neutral. It only gives a slight to moderate hint in baking (e.g. in pie crust) and gets really strong when you heat it more, e.g. when you fry in it or baste a roast. For a comparison of the smell, think bacon.


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