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31

Apple juice is good with pork. The frozen cans of concentrate are cheap and perfect for this use. Apple juice lacks the dark notes of cola. To get those I propose you add hoisin sauce. It is very sweet, a great mix with pork (I have some boneless ribs soaking in some right now awaiting the grill) and will lend the apple juice more of a dark sweet tone. ...


14

The main function that soda adds in these recipes is as a flavored syrup that also has an acid. So make your own. Add your preferred sweetener to water with some form of acidulation (I prefer apple cider vinegar with pork) and a few spices and you will have something suitable to use.


12

I learned a recipe for a chicken dish from my mother. Her recipe also called for cola to create a sticky and caramelised sauce. She taught me, however, that the cola could be replaced with fruit juice. Her preference was a mix of pineapple, mango, and orange juice. Shops where I live call this juice mix "tropical fruit" juice. It stands to reason, though, ...


8

That is a type of protein and connective tissue. Mainly you have collagen and elastin in a cut of meat. Collagen turns into gelatin through heating and melts away. The elastin will get softened. I believe what you’re seeing is the elastin.


7

Reconstituted dried blood will not have the quite the same texture as fresh blood. If the dish you're making requires blood as a thickener -- particularly if it's supposed to have a thick, gelatinous texture -- dried blood may not work correctly. For other textures, though, dried should be fine. By way of example, nearly all black pudding is made with dried ...


7

That looks like Pork neck or shoulder without a bone. The best way to prepare it is to grill it or bake.


5

Seems like you get the importance of the fat rendering but still want the spice rub on the meat. I would trim the skin and fat off in one piece, if possible, using a very sharp filet knife. (A small amount of fat left on the meat is okay.) Then rub your spice mix over all sides of the meat. Place the fat cap back on the meat where you removed it. On the top ...


5

Based on your original question and the comments, it sounds like you simply did not make an accurate assessment of the temperature of your product and your cooker. Low and slow is an excellent technique to make pork shoulder tender. Your goal should be an internal temperature of about 195 F ((90C). Estimates are that you should allow 1 to 1.5 hours per ...


5

I'm not sure I was able to tell exactly what he did when watching the video. What I know is that you should not use a marinade that came into contact with raw meat as a brushed on finishing sauce. Once it has come into contact with raw meat, it is not safe to consume uncooked. It is possible that he marinated the meat in a portion of the marinade, and ...


4

The flavors in Coke are cinnamon, vanilla, and citrus. I personally taste cinnamon the most. Dr. Pepper has a lot of other spice and berry flavors, and is similar to root beer. You could try to recreate the cola taste by using apple cider vinegar and adding cinnamon, vanilla, and molasses.


4

What about something like Hansen's? It's available at the local store here in Nowheresville, MN population ~7k so it shouldn't be too hard to find.


3

In Chinese roast pork, Cantonese style, kosher salt is placed on the pork skin before roasting to absorb the moisture. (I have also used aquarium salt). My recipe uses vinegar instead of a lemon before the salt goes on. Once the skin has crackled I then remove the salt before serving but you could just leave it on, or if you're not using this method, then ...


3

It is certainly possible using the oven only. For a good crackling you need to have several components - a good layer of fat under the skin, a nice dry skin surface before preparing, sufficient edges on the skin to help crisp the skin, and some salt and oil. There is a lot of debate around how to prepare the skin and the different methods for getting ...


2

Absolutely, it make give it a smokey but pleasant after taste but I in some ways prefer it to commercial lard. All bacon fat is, is a type of lard anyways done with typical dry heat such as a skillet or pan. It is arguably the best replacement you can use when making such dishes.


2

Depending on how much time you have, how often you would like to use this (or similar) recipes, how much you like the idea(s), and how involved you want to get... you could try making a cola syrup recipe*. You could even reconstitute it with club soda, or carbonated or sparkling water, or use water, a sprinkle of yeast, and some time to turn your syrup into ...


2

The best authoritative answer I could find specifically concerning the food safety was from a chemistry professor and science columnist. According to him, there is no known danger from consuming food that has fallen victim to the 'lasagna battery' effect. Personally, I have had this happen numerous times and served and eaten the offending food with no ...


2

The best way to make a good stock is using bones. Ideally, that's all you want to use to make your stock. The gelatinous stock comes from collagen and the best way to get any of that is to use bones. The best way I've found to do it is to make stock with all the bones left over after you've eaten ribs. Recently, I made 2 full racks of baby back ribs, and the ...


2

It won't look as nice, but it should be possible to rescue the flavour. As you've also got lemon in the filling, and feta is quite tart as well, I suggest you first remove the filling and dilute with extra cream cheese (and possibly olives and cooked garlic). Reheat enough to have with the pork and chill the rest too have with something else within a ...


1

This looks just like what we buy labeled "pork butt steak". It is a shoulder cut and is very flavorful. It is available both bone-in and boneless. And being the thickness you describe is less than an inch, it certainly sounds like it. We prepare it many different ways, very similar to how we would prepare pork chops. They are great pan fried, grilled, and ...


1

Yes, you can put both meats into the oven at the same time and take it out at the same time. However: You need to sear both before putting them in the oven to keep the juices inside and you will need to cut thin strips from the lamb when serving and then put it back in the oven as it will not be cooked to the bone. Bake the potatoes before the meat as ...


1

My initial thoughts would be: Sprinkle sugar over the dish, or blend it into the sauce. If the Roulade is sitting in the sauce, you might consider removing it and making the sauce fresh/over with less lemon juice. Another alternative might be adding more of the other sauce ingredients. That should dilute the extra lemon juice to the right proportion.


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