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31

Apple juice is good with pork. The frozen cans of concentrate are cheap and perfect for this use. Apple juice lacks the dark notes of cola. To get those I propose you add hoisin sauce. It is very sweet, a great mix with pork (I have some boneless ribs soaking in some right now awaiting the grill) and will lend the apple juice more of a dark sweet tone. ...


14

The main function that soda adds in these recipes is as a flavored syrup that also has an acid. So make your own. Add your preferred sweetener to water with some form of acidulation (I prefer apple cider vinegar with pork) and a few spices and you will have something suitable to use.


12

I learned a recipe for a chicken dish from my mother. Her recipe also called for cola to create a sticky and caramelised sauce. She taught me, however, that the cola could be replaced with fruit juice. Her preference was a mix of pineapple, mango, and orange juice. Shops where I live call this juice mix "tropical fruit" juice. It stands to reason, though, ...


8

That is a type of protein and connective tissue. Mainly you have collagen and elastin in a cut of meat. Collagen turns into gelatin through heating and melts away. The elastin will get softened. I believe what you’re seeing is the elastin.


7

Reconstituted dried blood will not have the quite the same texture as fresh blood. If the dish you're making requires blood as a thickener -- particularly if it's supposed to have a thick, gelatinous texture -- dried blood may not work correctly. For other textures, though, dried should be fine. By way of example, nearly all black pudding is made with dried ...


6

Duck fat. You could use butter, of course, which would make it delicious like everything made with butter is. But duck fat has a higher melting point than butter and in that respect is more like lard. Duck fat is super delicious. Also it seems to me duck fat is more in accord with the overall ethos of a game meat pie. You could buy plain duck fat. Or ...


5

Seems like you get the importance of the fat rendering but still want the spice rub on the meat. I would trim the skin and fat off in one piece, if possible, using a very sharp filet knife. (A small amount of fat left on the meat is okay.) Then rub your spice mix over all sides of the meat. Place the fat cap back on the meat where you removed it. On the top ...


5

Based on your original question and the comments, it sounds like you simply did not make an accurate assessment of the temperature of your product and your cooker. Low and slow is an excellent technique to make pork shoulder tender. Your goal should be an internal temperature of about 195 F ((90C). Estimates are that you should allow 1 to 1.5 hours per ...


4

The flavors in Coke are cinnamon, vanilla, and citrus. I personally taste cinnamon the most. Dr. Pepper has a lot of other spice and berry flavors, and is similar to root beer. You could try to recreate the cola taste by using apple cider vinegar and adding cinnamon, vanilla, and molasses.


4

What about something like Hansen's? It's available at the local store here in Nowheresville, MN population ~7k so it shouldn't be too hard to find.


3

As I am sure you know, different species have different flavors...beef tastes like beef...chicken tastes like chicken...and, well, pork tastes like pork. Further, when animals are butchered, we find that different parts of the same animal have different flavors. Further still, the animals diet before slaughter greatly impacts the flavor we perceive. ...


2

Depending on how much time you have, how often you would like to use this (or similar) recipes, how much you like the idea(s), and how involved you want to get... you could try making a cola syrup recipe*. You could even reconstitute it with club soda, or carbonated or sparkling water, or use water, a sprinkle of yeast, and some time to turn your syrup into ...


2

The best authoritative answer I could find specifically concerning the food safety was from a chemistry professor and science columnist. According to him, there is no known danger from consuming food that has fallen victim to the 'lasagna battery' effect. Personally, I have had this happen numerous times and served and eaten the offending food with no ...


2

The best way to make a good stock is using bones. Ideally, that's all you want to use to make your stock. The gelatinous stock comes from collagen and the best way to get any of that is to use bones. The best way I've found to do it is to make stock with all the bones left over after you've eaten ribs. Recently, I made 2 full racks of baby back ribs, and the ...


2

Historically, absolutely pig organ meats were used for sausage making. (The old joke "everything but the squeal" comes to mind.) In fact, I suspect that the notoriety of pig organs, due to their association with food adulteration, is largely responsible for them going out of fashion so entirely. Pigs liver has a strong, distinct taste. It's used in a number ...


1

The problem here is that it doesn't work as you suggest, the fat keeps the leaner game meats from drying out What you have in your recipe is not fat, it's bacon and belly, which is fat-rich tissue. When baking, the lean meat still dries out, the bacon stays soft, and the combination feels much juicier than the pure lean meat. If you simply add some ...


1

Generally, Americans are disgusted by organ meats, and it seems that the majority of English-language recipes one finds on the Internet are American. And even recipes which come from other English speaking countries aren't all that big on organ meat (although you might find the occasional black pudding recipe on British sites). I would suggest that you try ...


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