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4

Yes, you can use soy milk, but it will definitely affect the flavor. If you like the flavor of soy milk, go ahead, but I don't find it that appealing. Instead, I suggest using full fat coconut milk or coconut cream (you can find it in the international foods aisle in most grocery stores). I have used this subsitution several times before, and it will give ...


4

You started out great with cold cold butter and water and then you beat the livin crap out of em for 30 min. You are making a pie crust. The thing that makes pie crust flaky is that the small little pieces of butter, shortening, lard remain intact and then are gently flattened when you roll out the dough. ( good quality lard is best but a combination ...


4

This Serious Eats article explains it very clearly: First he presents the "old school" understanding of what is happening: Old school pastry books will tell you that when you cut butter or some other solid fat (like shortening or lard) into flour, what's happening is that you are encasing pockets of flour inside a shell of fat. Add water, and the flour ...


3

Soy milk/soy drink is, consistency wise, more of a milk than a cream substitute - but actual soy "cream" exists and is nowadays commonly found in many localities. It is undrinkably thick and creamy, like heavy cream. Ask your grocer if you have difficulties finding it. Read the ingredients lists, these products range from the simple to the very artificial. ...


3

I am going to try baking the pie crust on it's own on a baking tray. It's what most restaurants seem to do. Wish me luck.


2

So long as the filling is moist (and that's most of the point of a pot pie), the filling is going to steam the underside of the pastry, resulting in the dough cooking more slowly. Starting with a hot filling will help, as will cutting vents to allow the steam to escape, but you also need to try to ensure that the pastry doesn't actually touch the filling. (...


1

First, be sure to keep the butter as cold as possible. Cut it into small cubes and chuck it into the rest of the ingredients. Some people use what is called a pastry cutter, but many don't own one. What I usually do is either pull out my food processor with the blade attachment and pulse until the dough comes together (adding a few drops of cold water if ...


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