6

Pot Roasting = Braising This more recent document from the same association, Cattlemen's Beef Board and National Cattlemen's Beef, supports this by using them interchangeably: 3 Simple Steps For Braising/Pot Roasting Beef I was trying to figure out what the document from your question may have been implying by the cuts the different cooking techniques were ...


5

My Fanny Farmer recipe for pot roast does not submerge the roast in the liquid. So I would interpret the two words like this: braised: cut into pieces (perhaps bite-sized, perhaps serving sized) and submerged in simmering liquid for a long time, probably with lid to prevent liquid loss pot roasted: left whole and put into a lidded pot with an inch or so of ...


5

If you are planning to stew the leftovers, I would use the juices there: as a gravy base.


4

Yes. What you can do is throw the potatoes in with the meat - anything above 85C will eventually cook the potatoes through. Then when you pull the meat out to rest, raise the oven temperature to say 190 - 200 C and possibly add a little fat. They won't take long to finish roasting to a nice golden brown.


4

If you follow proper cooling and food storage methods you should be able to treat this just like any other par-cooking method. I would suggest browning the meat and veg and then cooling it quickly by placing it in a large zip top bag with cold stock to rapidly cool the meat. This will enable you to quickly cool the meat and allow you to store/marinate the ...


4

Either way should work, though the results might depend on your crockpot's cooking temperatures. ("High" and "low" can create different temperatures on different models.) It comes down to your personal preferences about: How well-done or "mushy" you want the vegetables to be Whether you want the vegetables to cook in the meat juices and get the full "...


4

First of all, don't drain it off. You want to let the meat cook in its own juices the whole time. If you take the liquid away, you'll be missing out on one of the main benefits of cooking meat in its own little bag: it gets cooked in its own juices and keeps all that flavor. But there will of course still be some liquid left in the end. Don't let the fact ...


3

You can cook Brisket to the point that it it is tender but sliceable, but that's tricky if you're slow cooking while at work or the like. Try topside, also often called salmon cut. It has a less a denser texture than brisket but still responds well to slow cooking.


3

You are looking for a lean cut. The reason meat "falls apart" after a long, slow cooking process is that the connective tissues and fat dissolve/gelatinize. You still risk this in any cut if the moisture level gets too high, but I've had great success with pork tenderloin in a slow cooker being still sliceable after 6-8 hours. I don't see any reason why ...


3

Put the meat in a sous-vide bag, and place that in your crock pot with the vegetables.


2

I almost always use the liquid. It's just jus. The risk is that if you pre-salted the meat the jus can get excessively salty. This is one reason I salt afterwards. If you pour the jus into a pan and heat it you'll see that it clumps up and gets nasty. This is the myoglobin coagulating. A fine strainer removes this easily, and what's left behind should have ...


2

I find the liquid remaining after a long cook (over a few hours) to be too beefy for my tastes. I generally discard. It is certainly safe. I don't think it is necessary to drain and re-bag. I do think it would overpower veggies. This site is very helpful if you are new to low temp cooking: http://www.cookingissues.com/primers/sous-vide/


2

Try a self basting lid? My cast iron lids all have self basting bumps on them. This lets the water and oil that's splattered up drip back down on the food rather than running off to the sides.


2

I make a lot of home cured corned beef so the seasonings are pretty set. When I first started, I didn't try to make a soft tiny roast to test the seasoning, instead I sliced off a thicker slice and cooked in slowly on the stovetop until it was done to my liking then tasted it. I wasn't worried about making it soft and tender when I was testing for seasoning. ...


1

I put my veggies on the bottom. Midway, I reverse the meat and veggies or just mix all in. I do not want my root veggies too mushy. I always cook at high temp 6 hours (roast/stew) after browning meats and warming veggies and liquids.


1

Cooking it on the stovetop means that the top of the item can be significantly cooler than the bottom. When you consider that liquids can carry more thermal energy than air, this can result in a signficant problems when cooking. I'd recommend at least one of the following: Use a tight-fitting lid, so that there's a signficant amount of steam trapped in ...


1

My favorite is the cheeks. This cut has a different fiber structure and thus does not easily get so soft it falls apart.


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