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19

If you're doing it as a pot roast, the vegetables are mainly there to deliver flavour (unlike in a stew, where they're a major part of the dish). Sometimes they're eaten, sometimes discarded (which seems like a waste to me, so I would choose vegetables I'd want to eat). They take on a role similar to stock or a flavoured rub or oil when roasting in an oven. ...


14

To directly answer the question as it was originally posted before edit: why does everyone add vegetables to slow cooker pot roast To save time Longer answer: It is not necessary to cook vegetables with meat. The vegetables do add flavor (a flavor that many appreciate) but I don't feel that is the main reason. Many people add potatoes to the pot ...


6

I could not find (quick search) a reference to the fact that using a metal bowl "destroys" vitamins. Aluminum bowls will react to some ingredients, mostly acidic ones (tomatoes, citrus..), but in a normal usage (blending fruits) , it should not be a problem. Stainless steel bowls are NON reactive, and can be used with all ingredients, and usually sturdy ...


6

I think the answer to your question lies in the etymology of the words. Pan is actually coming from Germaic pfanne (in Dutch panne). Which is from Latin patina (shallow pan, dish) and Greek patane (dish, plate). On the other hand, pot also has Germanic roots it means vessel (also in Dutch) coming from pottus (drinking cup) for Latin. So the difference as ...


5

As a native English speaker, certainly where I come from, saucepan and cooking pot are mostly interchangeable. However, I understand the differentiation to be that "pans" have long, extended handles and "pots" do not. So a pan: And a pot: Edit to include dictionary definitions kindly provided in a comment by user3169 Pan: "A pan is a round metal container ...


3

Lifted from a similar question elsewhere on StackExchange: If you have hard water, a soak in vinegar can be helpful. A cooked on veneer of calcium carbonate, or similar water minerals, can make food stick to the surface of the pan very tightly. Vineger will dissolve the stuff completely – Wayfaring Stranger Jul 20 '13 at 12:36 You mention you've already ...


3

I agree about those vegetables. Julia Child has a great solution. Julia Child only adds aromatics like onions, celery, carrots, and garlic (never potatoes) to a roast in her pot roast recipes (see Beef Burgundy). Once the roast is finished, she strains-out the aromatics because they are now tasteless and mushy. She then sautes pearl onions in butter and ...


2

The only thing I can think of, is that frying or sauté pans usually have larger cooking surfaces and will aid in evaporating liquid more quickly compare to pots if you use fresh peas it should not have any benefit one way or the other, but if you use frozen peas, then they will have more humidity (liquid) and using a pan might make cooking the peas easier. ...


1

Quality stainless steel (all-clad, calphalon, etc.) is never completely non-stick, but you can still fry an egg and have it slide right out without sticking if you follow a few best practices: Your pan must be scrupulously clean. Turn down the fire. Cold fat to a hot pan. By clean, I mean cleaner than clean. Dishwashers can't do it, nor can plain Dawn and ...


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