37

No peeling is needed. A good wash and proper cooking will handle all of your food safety needs.


28

This is what America's Test Kitchen (sorry, paywalled) has to say about it: Sometimes baked potatoes can use a flavor boost. And instead of light and fluffy, most often they are dense and crumbly. We found that baking the potatoes on a bed of salt remedied these problems. Moisture that escaped the potatoes during baking was trapped in the enclosed pan, ...


22

Remove a potato one at a time from the hot water with tongs, placing it in cold water for shock. Wearing dishwashing gloves, while under the cold water pull on the potato skin removing it. Place the skinned potato in a finished container and proceed to the next potato


19

By frying your potatoes then putting the lid on, you fried your potatoes then steamed them, so it's no wonder they weren't crispy. Although it takes longer, par-boiling the potatoes first is by far the best way to get crispy on the outside, fluffy on the inside potatoes. Par-boiling cooks the inside of the potato, so that all you need to do in the pan is ...


19

45 minutes of boiling is more than enough time to soften potatoes regardless of altitude. Parboiling potatoes before roasting frees up and gelatinizes starches on the outside of the potatoes that then get nice and crunchy when roasted. It will not do anything useful in your stew. The likely culprit for your potatoes not softening is probably acid. When ...


18

The main source of gluten in pierogi (the plural is pierogi, the singular is actually pierog) is the flour in the dough. You should be able to substitute regular flour for a gluten free version (eg rice flour) to make them gluten free. The same goes for whatever filling you are using, if you would regularly use flour as a thickening agent try corn starch or ...


17

The coating you are talking about is potato starch that is browning on the bottom of the pan, similar to what happens to roux when it is prepared. If you deglaze the pan using alcohol, it will come right off without any effort (water works too, though more is needed). As for how to get the potatoes not to stick, it's important that the pan and the oil are ...


17

You cannot; they are full of solanine, which is poisonous. You can use the seeds however to grow new potatoes, though they won't breed true to the parent. This website has some great information: http://tinyfarmblog.com/potato-fruit/


15

I have used these tips from TheKitchn for my latkes and they have always turned out fantastically! Strain, Squeeze, Strain: To avoid soggy latkes, you need to wring out your potato mixture really, really well. Folks have different theories about how many times you should wring out the mixture and what you should use. I favor cheesecloth if you have it. ...


14

Vodka by definition is a flavorless distilled alcohol, retaining any of the organoleptic properties of the grain or potato could be considered as ruining the end product. Potatoes are a good source of starch, but brewers yeast has a limited ability to break down starch into usable fuel; its preferred fuel sources are relatively simple sugars like mono and ...


13

If you want to go all engineer on your unsuspecting spuds, take their temperature with an instant read thermometer. According to several online sources I found, the ideal internal temp for your 'tater is 210F (99°C).


13

My guess of what happened was that the potatoes were sitting in an open pot that was not in a rolling boil. I'm going to assume that they went down from the pass and the place where "they took up [their] quarters" was at 11,000ft. This region was then, as it is today, almost destitute of vegetation. Darwin notes in the paragraph just before the ...


12

Potatoes are very popular in some parts of Mexico. When I lived in Guadalajara, potato tacos were common, usually deep-fried. Diced (and possibly pre-cooked) potatoes with some seasoning added to a soft taco shell, then the entire thing fried together until crispy. After frying, such tacos (whether with potatoes or other filling) were cracked open to add ...


12

Absolutely no peeling necessary. In addition to the above advice, if you (or anyone else) is overly concerned about 'germs' and the like on the skin, use a small plastic-bristled scrub brush to clean the potatoes properly under running water. I usually don't, unless they are really gritty from the field or have huge divots on the surface where water may not ...


12

There are many roasting recipes that use a bed or even a dome of salt. This has three effects that I am aware of- 1- It salts the food obviously. This isn't necessarily a reason all by itself. As you noticed salt is just as easily added later. 2- It keeps the food off the pan. In the case of fish this can make for easier service. 3- The salt becomes part ...


12

Preheat the pan for longer than you expect, then preheat the oil as well. Cast iron takes a long time to heat up. With some foods you can get away with not preheating so it may seem silly to just let the pan sit on the burner with nothing else happening, but the potatoes will test your patience because of how much they can stick to pans. Once you add the ...


12

There is no need to remove potato from the holes on each stroke, which appears to be what you are describing doing. Just pick it up and smash it down on some un-smashed potatoes until there are no more of those. The potato already smashed through the holes will eventually fall back into the pot during this process. Then, when done smashing, turn the tool ...


12

I almost never peel potatoes. I like the flavor and texture of the skins, even in mashed potatoes, and unpeeled potatoes are less prone to becoming waterlogged. According to Tablespoon.com, the Idaho Potato Commission recommends that you leave potatoes unpeeled for boiling for reasons of flavor and texture, even if you intend to peel the potatoes after ...


11

All of the sources I read say the same thing... what makes them different is that they're fried twice. From Saveur: Frites are the supercharged cousin to paltry American-style fries: made from soft Belgian potatoes called bintjes, they're thick-cut and—this is key—double-fried (in the olden days, in molten horse or ox fat, though modern options range ...


10

Refrigerating accomplishes several things: It is the right temperature to get the intended flavor. Flavors change with temperature, and some dishes get the correct taste when cold. Flavors get to blend more. Aromatic spices sometimes take time to soak into the sauce, and liquids absorb into the potatoes more Cold is an easy way to prevent spoilage. ...


10

That was bad advice. If you're not par-boiling the potatoes they will need at least 40 minutes, but to be honest you are much better off par-boiling. Pre-heat the oven as before and place a roasting tin in to pre-heat as well. Cut the potatoes as before, then place them in a large pan of salted water, bring it to the boil, and simmer for 5 minutes. Drain ...


10

French fried potatoes (or as the British say, chips) are a deep fried food. In fact, the US term "to french fry" orignally simply meant to deep fry, although simply "french fry" has now come to mean the dish of french fried potatoes. As such, they inherently are not a low fat or small-oil-volume food. If you are asking how you can create these with less ...


10

I think the best solution is to avoid pre-mixing or pre-saucing anything. If you bring out a big bowl of pasta tossed (or topped) with sauce, the only way to get sauce is to eat pasta. Imagine instead you bring out: a big bowl of pasta, perhaps tossed with a little oil to keep it from sticking a bowl of brown rice marinara sauce alfredo sauce olive-oil-...


10

This most likely means waxy potatoes, typically white or red. In some contexts it might also mean you want small ones so that you can boil and serve them whole, but it doesn't look like that's the case here. There are two main kinds of potatoes, starchy and waxy. Starchy ones (like russets) cook up fluffy and dry, desirable for things like baked potatoes ...


10

Absolutely! Right away if you like. And you may well notice they taste really nice when you do that. "New potatoes" - small, and not stored for long - are delicious.


10

The way I have achieved this is by gently simmering the potato cubes until they soften. (You want them pretty much cooked, but not so done that they won't hold together well.) I also lightly salt the water so they take on a little seasoning while they cook. This, of course, is optional. Next, I drain the potatoes very well. I want them to essentially be ...


9

Yes it IS possible to create a "pringles" like product using just a few simple items that you probably already have in your home. I will post the ingredients after I list the few items you need. First you will need a mixing bowl, a measuring cup, measuring spoons, and a pasta maker (to help flatten the dough). If you do not have a pasta making machine, do ...


9

Not to take anything away from the answers already existing for this question, but I want to add one more reference: Kenji Alt's in depth opus on creating the McDonald's style fry at home. In summary, his method is to: Blanche the cut potatoes in water lightly acidified with vinegar, to allow them to cook through while the acid keeps the pectin from ...


9

Because you are from a specific country with his own culture. It uis quite normal for example in Italy to have a Risotto with tomato sauce, olives and tuna maybe (and even capers). It is also quite normal to have noodles (some of which which are exaclty the same type of weath as pasta) with soy sauce, in a soup or in a stir fry. The properties of the ...


9

I found this, it's Ask.com so even though I'm posting it as an answer, I don't consider it the answer. I'd still love to hear what some of the expert bakers here have to say. (emphasis mine) As you begin to bake different types of breads, you will come across some older bread recipes that call for potato water. Potato water is the water that potatoes ...


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