12

The important part of the system are the lids. The ideal lids are the Mason-type (no matter which company produced them), with a flat top and a separate side piece with thread. Another type that works is the older Weck style jar, which consists of a glass jar with glass lid, plus rubber steal and metal clamps, no threads. This system is as safe as the ...


8

Tomatoes aren't high acid, so they need the addition of vinegar or lemon juice in order to safely can with a hot water bath. Honestly, I'm not sure why you would want to make tomato sauce from canned tomatoes because for me, the whole point of canning tomatoes is because the tomatoes will otherwise go bad. But anyhow... I recommend finding a tomato sauce ...


8

I can't come up with a way to do this that is not problematic. First, no canning authority I can find provides instructions on how to re-can under pressure food that is already canned. The closest instructions I can find are from the national center for food preservation, which basically say "don't do it". Second, you're talking about a month between ...


6

I just spoke with someone from Presto - apparently, the pressure is meant to be maintained by adjusting the heat source, and the weight provided with the canner is meant only to build pressure and not as a regulator. They also recommend against adjusting the weight in order to achieve in-between pressures. Not sure why on that last point - I'll follow up ...


6

While that'd be a lot less risky than no pressure cooking at all, it's not fully safe. For complete safety, it's important that the actual canning processing be pressure cooking. The problem is, even if the jar is sterilized, and the food is safe before you put it in, there's no way to completely ensure that no additional spores make their way into the jar ...


5

No. This is not a safe method of canning low acid food. When we talk about "sterilization" in a home environment, we are utterly fooling ourselves. The SECOND the sanitized jars come out of the hot water they are exposed to everything in the air and on our hands and utensils and are no long sanitized. This is also the reason why it is not longer advised to ...


4

For home pressure canning, you should always use a Mason jar (Ball is one brand, but there are others). A "Mason jar" is the kind with the two-piece lid. When using home equipment, the two-piece lid is important because it will seal properly inside the pressure vessel. If you use a jar with a one-piece lid, such as in your photo, the lid tightness needs to ...


4

Which valve is which? See labels below: When to use the auto valve? According to user manual Page 6, Section 5.7, you are supposed to move the handle on the auto valve at least twice a week to make sure it doesn't get stuck. Other than that, just leave it alone and let it do its thing. It will automatically maintain your pressure and temperature. I guess ...


4

NO! Using your method you have created the perfect environment to grow Clostridium botulinum, so within a couple of days you very well could have a thriving colony of botulism rich food. From USDA Complete Guide to Home Canning Ensuring safe canned foods Growth of the bacterium Clostridium botulinum in canned food may cause botulism—a deadly form ...


3

Pressure cookers and pressure canners are the same thing; with the canners being larger, and often having a pressure dial. Both can reach the same pressures and therefore temperatures if designed and manufactured correctly The pressure canners dial gauge is more accurate for adjusting for food types and altitude, as you can get exact numbers not just 10 psi ...


3

Peppers are a low acid food, so under home conditions, pressure canning will be required to do so. See for example: NCFHFP recipe for peppers.


3

BEWARE that no electric pressure cookers have been approved for pressure canning by the USDA. The National Center for Home Food Preservation actually put out a bulletin after manufacturers, like the Power Pressure Cooker XL, started to advertise that their cooker was USDA approved. It is not. Please do not pressure can in this, or any other electric ...


3

In canning, you have to be very sure that you have produced the exact conditions needed for the process to work properly. If you deviate a bit, it can happen that bacterial spores survive. These "exact conditions" mean not only "keeping temperature X for time Y". You have to make sure that proper heat exchange happens where it needs to happen. In the case ...


3

The book Putting Food By recommends canning pints or half pints (about the range you have) of hot-pack pimentos at 10lbs pressure (240F/116C) for 20 minutes (sorry for the American measurements, it's an American book). They also recommend putting a small amount of acid in the canning liquid, like 1tsp white vinegar per pint. By "hot-pack" they mean grilled,...


3

According to Putting Foods By, 25th ed. (1982), you can fill tomato jars with just hot boiled tomato juice rather than requiring additional acid, and then pressure-can them: 10lbs pressure / 40 minutes for skinned whole tomatoes 10lbs pressure / 15 minutes for sliced or diced tomatoes ... with some adjustments depending on jar size. However, their ...


2

Not a full answer, but I found the video on this page showing how to use a very similar device (no sound that I can see, and text in Chinese) on Alibaba. It seems that the two valves with sort of rocker style heads are for steam release - you can flip these to release pressure once sterilization is complete - a spoon or fork or something similar will ...


2

I agree that those pressures are odd. I haven't personally seen recipes with such non-standard pressures. I've found that nearly all recipes I use call for either 10 or 15 lbs of pressure. Obviously the higher the pressure the higher the cooking temp and the more the food will be damaged. Ideally you would want the lowest temperature that will render the ...


2

Nothing opinion-based about it. If you are canning anything that's "low-acid" you need a pressure canner, regardless of altitude. That's "higher pressure than at sea level." Boiling water bath does not kill botulism spores, so you either need an acidic environment or you need to process under pressure to get sufficient temperature to kill the spores. ...


2

I assume by "power" you mean an electric pressure cooker/canner. If so, increase the amount of pressure (in pounds) by 1/2 pound for every thousand feet above 2,000 feet. Water bath canning requires that for foods that require 20 minutes or less processing time, you add 1 (one) additional minute for every 1,000 foot increment above 2,000 feet. If the ...


2

For low acid foods the high and low settings are a problem. You really need to know what pressures those are. You have to get to 15 PSI which will give you a boiling temperature of about 250F. Anything less and it won't get hot enough to kill botulism spores. For most high acid foods the pressure cooker will be overkill. Most high acid foods such as fruit ...


2

I am working on a related question and I have discovered that there is an industrial process for canning at atmospheric pressure called "Flame Sterilization." Flame Sterilization works using very high temperatures directed from one side, where the can is rotated rapidly to prevent one side of the internal contents from getting too hot. This is achieved, ...


2

Here are the things I'd have liked to know before I tried hot water canning: It's not as straightforward as it sounds. In addition to a large pot of boiling water and canning jars, you'll need a special rack. You can buy a pot + rack combo, or just a rack that'll fit in a standard stockpot. You'll also need special tongs; as I discovered, you can jury-rig ...


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