We’re rewarding the question askers & reputations are being recalculated! Read more.
56

The sieve-like item is a steamer insert, used to cook things that do not cook well if submerged in the comparatively large amount of water a pressure cooker needs to operate. The wire is a stand for this insert, to raise it above the waterline. Unless you bought it used: Pressure cooker makers tend to give free books away with their pots, often a classic ...


37

I doubt that your meat is really greasy. If it is really overly fat, you will notice it when buying it, your meat will be marbled through and through. But it is difficult to get such meat nowadays at all, since it is rather expensive to produce. The mouthfeel you describe is more likely to come from the gelatine. When you make pulled pork in the pressure ...


37

Physics stops you from heating up liquids that consist of mostly water to temperatures above (roughly) 100 C. The temperature of your heating element can be set higher, but neither the temperature of the water bath nor the liquid in your jars can go higher than the boiling point where water changes from liquid to vapor - which is 100 C at normal pressure ...


27

There really are a couple separate issues that come together here: What is collagen to gelatin conversion? When collagen converts to gelatin, it is not melting (which is the same type of molecule, just as ice and liquid water are the same thing). Instead, it is being hydrated which is a chemical conversion process, where water is actually being added into ...


22

I'm afraid you have gotten something wrong. Sous-vide and pressure cooking are, as far as food physics is concerned, on the opposite ends of the scale. Pressure cooking allows you to increase the boiling point of water, thus reducing the cooking time. (Bad idea for a tender steak, btw., as soon as you exceed a certain temperature, the proteins in the meat ...


20

Beef cut does matter. Sirloin tip is a relatively tender cut, cuts that have done more work like shoulder, round, leg cuts have more connective tissue and need a significantly longer cooking time. In a pressure cooker this isn't that long, 1 hour is what I've seen for instant pot recipes using working cuts. Also what matters is fat content. Whatever you ...


19

You can trim/remove some of the fat or use a leaner cut like a loin to achieve this before-hand After cooking pull the pieces of meat out before you shred them and set them aside. Then strain your juice and remove as much of the rendered fat as you can. It should have separated. Also chilling will cause the rendered fat to coagulate making it easier to ...


18

Simply put: it's happening because you're now blending the vegetables prior to cooking. All vegetables are composed of plant cells, which have relatively rigid, fibrous walls composed of various starches; these trap the moisture and nutrients that the plant needs to survive, and provide structure. As you cook (applying heat) those starches will soften and ...


14

No, it isn't safe, water bath canning is only safe for high-acid foods as the acid kills botulism. Low-acid food must be processed at 240F, 116C, and that can only be achieved in a pressure canner. When you pressure cook the soup it kills the bacteria, however when you then transfer it to the sterilized jars it could be contaminated on the way, and then ...


13

I‘m sure you could do this. But the gain may be less than you calculate and the results will not be exactly the same: If you are (pre-)steaming the vegetables, your are keeping their individual flavor whereas by cooking in the curry sauce you get a more evened out flavor as the various ingredients contribute to the overall flavor and absorb the spices. ...


11

There are several advantages to using a pressure cooker other than speed, the first of which address your concerns about skimming. If operated correctly the water in a pressure cooker will never come to the boil resulting in a clearer stock than one made by convention means. From Modernist Cuisine (2-291): The liquid inside the pressure cooker will not ...


10

There are some advantages to a pressure cooker, but I don't think that the rice QUITE finishes in 10 minutes in my experience. For proper texture, it still seems to take some time for the rice to fully hydrate and steam itself after the heat is off. A normal well-covered pot of (most kinds of) rice takes approximately 25-30 min after it comes to a boil, and ...


9

What you need for the conversion of collagen is a certain amount of energy. It is a complicated process - the melting point is around 70°C for the type of collagen contained in beef, but the melting does not happen instantly once the meat reaches 70°C. In a pressure cooking, you can apply the same amount of energy in a shorter amount of time. This is not bad,...


8

The main reason for using the quick release is to prevent overcooking, think about what would happen to white rice if you left the cooker to de-pressurise naturally: it would be mush. Of course, you could factor the time taken to come back to normal pressure into the original cooking time but that's fraught with difficulty because it's dependent on what ...


8

TL;DR The Instant Pot is primarily a pressure cooker and its "steam" function is for pressure steaming. I guess typically you do raw/frozen veggies and seafood with this function. You can do normal steaming in "sauté" mode with a vented glass lid (sold as an optional accessory, or if you have a vented lid that fits). Why? Is it the case that the "steam" ...


8

Hard to know how this translates to the pressure cooker context, but I've made stroganoff many times over the years in a skillet using a variety of cuts of beef, and I've never noticed that much of a difference in the quality. I've used London Broil, flank steak, skirt steak, flat iron steak, sirloin and probably others that I'm not remembering. What's ...


7

According to Eating Well who consulted a food scientist, yes, some heat sensitive nutrients are lost, but no more so than other forms of cooking: Pressure cooking can reduce heat-sensitive nutrients (e.g., vitamin C, folate) and bioactive phytonutrients, such as betacarotene, glucosinolates (helpful compounds found in cruciferous vegetables) and ...


7

I use a pressure cooker quite often and its all about the cut of the meat. Much like slow cooking, using a often cheaper, fatty cut with lots of connective tissue - a chuck roast for example, yields much, much better results. Lean cuts of meat are make for fast searing and that's about it. If you try to coax them to be fall apart fork tender, you'll fail -...


7

Types There are many different designs, but in general they all achieve the same result. The style you get comes down to personal preference Personally I do not like the type with the lid that is captured under the internal rim on the pot, as they seem awkward to get the lid on and off The quarter turn screw down lid (like a jar lid) seems easier to me ...


7

Yes, I wrote a post about this a few years ago - the first to describe the method in a home pressure cooker. The theory goes that the pressure difference inside and outside the egg PLUS the shock of the cold facilitates the detachment of membrane from the shell. The Kitchn tried and confirmed my method and many of my readers will no longer hard boil an egg ...


7

It's good that the "green arrow valve" never popped up; that's the safety fuse, and only "pops" (destructively, and probably spraying food onto the ceiling) when the cooker pressure goes way too high. The missing part is the pressure regulator, gauge or counterweight. The pressure cooker won't work without it. It blocks steam coming out of the vent until ...


7

...a pressure cooker can't really speed up the process for breaking down the fat in the pork belly... Nope - this isn't really true, nor is it a complete description of what's going on. Pork belly doesn't just contain a large amount of fat, it contains a large amount of connective tissue (which is why it's so tough when not properly slow-cooked). The goal ...


6

I never tried it, but I don't think it is a good idea. The point of popcorn popping is that you cook the inside of the kernel within its hard shell until the internal pressure increases so much that it breaks the shell, releasing the starchy liquid inside as a foam. You need a pressure gradient, with higher pressure inside the kernel than on the outside. ...


6

There is no rule, you should use the cooking times in your chart or a reputable timing chart, I use this one hippressurecooking.com/pressure-cooking-times Basically, you'll want to phase-in the ingredients. That means, cook the beef roast for the time your cooking chart says, say 30 minutes, then open the pressure cooker and add the vegetables and pressure ...


6

While that'd be a lot less risky than no pressure cooking at all, it's not fully safe. For complete safety, it's important that the actual canning processing be pressure cooking. The problem is, even if the jar is sterilized, and the food is safe before you put it in, there's no way to completely ensure that no additional spores make their way into the jar ...


6

Beans and legumes produce a lot of scum/foam (it's a mostly denatured protein mat) while cooking. For a pressure cooker, this can clog your vents (a bad thing). So you want to ensure that not too much is produced. Your user manual should have a section describing the cooking of beans and/or legumes with appropriate instructions. An example is on page 23 ...


6

There are several different categories of these devices, but they do all tend to look quite similar. Prices can vary by a very significant amount, though. So. Rice Cooker The simplest kind of rice cooker is the kind with just a switch on the front to turn it on. Mine is like this - when plugged in, it's in "warm" mode, press the switch and it goes to "cook"...


6

It is going to depend greatly on what you cook and where you are. Long braises can be shortened by hours. It is nearly impossible to cook beans in Bogota Colombia without a pressure cooker. cite Lentils on the other hand. The recommended times in the IP manual and on the bag for not in a pressure cooking are the same. And as you say, with the IP natural ...


6

I don't see anything "special" about that recipe that depends on the particular pressure cooker. I don't think you need anything fancier than an old-fashioned pressure cooker and a timer, assuming you know how to use an old-fashioned pressure cooker. If you already own one, why buy another? Figure time on "high" to be time on 15 PSI (or 1 bar) steam, and ...


5

Aluminum isn't exactly toxic or harmful to the same degree as lead, but it's not exactly good for you either. And as you've identified, aluminum is fairly reactive. Higher acidity, salinity, and cooking time will all contribute to further reaction and absorption in any aluminum cooking vessel (or utensils for that matter). This is an issue for three ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible