56

The sieve-like item is a steamer insert, used to cook things that do not cook well if submerged in the comparatively large amount of water a pressure cooker needs to operate. The wire is a stand for this insert, to raise it above the waterline. Unless you bought it used: Pressure cooker makers tend to give free books away with their pots, often a classic ...


38

Physics stops you from heating up liquids that consist of mostly water to temperatures above (roughly) 100 C. The temperature of your heating element can be set higher, but neither the temperature of the water bath nor the liquid in your jars can go higher than the boiling point where water changes from liquid to vapor - which is 100 C at normal pressure ...


37

I doubt that your meat is really greasy. If it is really overly fat, you will notice it when buying it, your meat will be marbled through and through. But it is difficult to get such meat nowadays at all, since it is rather expensive to produce. The mouthfeel you describe is more likely to come from the gelatine. When you make pulled pork in the pressure ...


30

There really are a couple separate issues that come together here: What is collagen to gelatin conversion? When collagen converts to gelatin, it is not melting (which is the same type of molecule, just as ice and liquid water are the same thing). Instead, it is being hydrated which is a chemical conversion process, where water is actually being added into ...


25

A quick google search illustrates that this appears to be a common concern for instant pot users. Have you checked the sealing ring, steam release, and float valve to ensure that they are clean and working properly? You may just need some cleaning and preventive maintenance. You don't mention the brand, but you can begin with your user manual. Here is ...


22

I'm afraid you have gotten something wrong. Sous-vide and pressure cooking are, as far as food physics is concerned, on the opposite ends of the scale. Pressure cooking allows you to increase the boiling point of water, thus reducing the cooking time. (Bad idea for a tender steak, btw., as soon as you exceed a certain temperature, the proteins in the meat ...


20

Beef cut does matter. Sirloin tip is a relatively tender cut, cuts that have done more work like shoulder, round, leg cuts have more connective tissue and need a significantly longer cooking time. In a pressure cooker this isn't that long, 1 hour is what I've seen for instant pot recipes using working cuts. Also what matters is fat content. Whatever you ...


19

You can trim/remove some of the fat or use a leaner cut like a loin to achieve this before-hand After cooking pull the pieces of meat out before you shred them and set them aside. Then strain your juice and remove as much of the rendered fat as you can. It should have separated. Also chilling will cause the rendered fat to coagulate making it easier to ...


18

Simply put: it's happening because you're now blending the vegetables prior to cooking. All vegetables are composed of plant cells, which have relatively rigid, fibrous walls composed of various starches; these trap the moisture and nutrients that the plant needs to survive, and provide structure. As you cook (applying heat) those starches will soften and ...


13

I‘m sure you could do this. But the gain may be less than you calculate and the results will not be exactly the same: If you are (pre-)steaming the vegetables, your are keeping their individual flavor whereas by cooking in the curry sauce you get a more evened out flavor as the various ingredients contribute to the overall flavor and absorb the spices. ...


11

There are several advantages to using a pressure cooker other than speed, the first of which address your concerns about skimming. If operated correctly the water in a pressure cooker will never come to the boil resulting in a clearer stock than one made by convention means. From Modernist Cuisine (2-291): The liquid inside the pressure cooker will not boil,...


10

There are some advantages to a pressure cooker, but I don't think that the rice QUITE finishes in 10 minutes in my experience. For proper texture, it still seems to take some time for the rice to fully hydrate and steam itself after the heat is off. A normal well-covered pot of (most kinds of) rice takes approximately 25-30 min after it comes to a boil, and ...


8

The main reason for using the quick release is to prevent overcooking, think about what would happen to white rice if you left the cooker to de-pressurise naturally: it would be mush. Of course, you could factor the time taken to come back to normal pressure into the original cooking time but that's fraught with difficulty because it's dependent on what ...


8

TL;DR The Instant Pot is primarily a pressure cooker and its "steam" function is for pressure steaming. I guess typically you do raw/frozen veggies and seafood with this function. You can do normal steaming in "sauté" mode with a vented glass lid (sold as an optional accessory, or if you have a vented lid that fits). Why? Is it the case that the "steam" ...


8

Hard to know how this translates to the pressure cooker context, but I've made stroganoff many times over the years in a skillet using a variety of cuts of beef, and I've never noticed that much of a difference in the quality. I've used London Broil, flank steak, skirt steak, flat iron steak, sirloin and probably others that I'm not remembering. What's ...


8

Assuming that you are talking about a tempered glass bowl that is marketed as microwave, dishwasher and oven safe, there should be no problem in the pressure cooker. For glass vessels, the most critical uses are rapid temperature changes and uneven heating, the surrounding pressure isn’t an issue. I recommend the following safety measures: Before every ...


7

Yes, I wrote a post about this a few years ago - the first to describe the method in a home pressure cooker. The theory goes that the pressure difference inside and outside the egg PLUS the shock of the cold facilitates the detachment of membrane from the shell. The Kitchn tried and confirmed my method and many of my readers will no longer hard boil an egg ...


7

It's good that the "green arrow valve" never popped up; that's the safety fuse, and only "pops" (destructively, and probably spraying food onto the ceiling) when the cooker pressure goes way too high. The missing part is the pressure regulator, gauge or counterweight. The pressure cooker won't work without it. It blocks steam coming out of the vent until ...


7

...a pressure cooker can't really speed up the process for breaking down the fat in the pork belly... Nope - this isn't really true, nor is it a complete description of what's going on. Pork belly doesn't just contain a large amount of fat, it contains a large amount of connective tissue (which is why it's so tough when not properly slow-cooked). The goal ...


6

There is no rule, you should use the cooking times in your chart or a reputable timing chart, I use this one hippressurecooking.com/pressure-cooking-times Basically, you'll want to phase-in the ingredients. That means, cook the beef roast for the time your cooking chart says, say 30 minutes, then open the pressure cooker and add the vegetables and pressure ...


6

While that'd be a lot less risky than no pressure cooking at all, it's not fully safe. For complete safety, it's important that the actual canning processing be pressure cooking. The problem is, even if the jar is sterilized, and the food is safe before you put it in, there's no way to completely ensure that no additional spores make their way into the jar ...


6

Beans and legumes produce a lot of scum/foam (it's a mostly denatured protein mat) while cooking. For a pressure cooker, this can clog your vents (a bad thing). So you want to ensure that not too much is produced. Your user manual should have a section describing the cooking of beans and/or legumes with appropriate instructions. An example is on page 23 ...


6

There are several different categories of these devices, but they do all tend to look quite similar. Prices can vary by a very significant amount, though. So. Rice Cooker The simplest kind of rice cooker is the kind with just a switch on the front to turn it on. Mine is like this - when plugged in, it's in "warm" mode, press the switch and it goes to "cook"...


6

It is going to depend greatly on what you cook and where you are. Long braises can be shortened by hours. It is nearly impossible to cook beans in Bogota Colombia without a pressure cooker. cite Lentils on the other hand. The recommended times in the IP manual and on the bag for not in a pressure cooking are the same. And as you say, with the IP natural ...


6

I don't see anything "special" about that recipe that depends on the particular pressure cooker. I don't think you need anything fancier than an old-fashioned pressure cooker and a timer, assuming you know how to use an old-fashioned pressure cooker. If you already own one, why buy another? Figure time on "high" to be time on 15 PSI (or 1 bar) steam, and ...


6

I would go for option 3): correct it DURING cooking. Have you already tried cooking it shorter? 110 minutes seems extremely long in a pressure cooker, especially considering that you add another 20 minutes of cooking time after that for the pressure relief. The temperatures in a pressure cooker are exactly right for converting connective tissue into ...


6

When we use a pressure cooker, we do so with separate pans inside the cooker - flat round tins, in our case - that can be kept off the bottom by adding something underneath. Or stack up cook several things at the same time, if the size allows. I recall seeing these largish round metal rings like an inch high that I think were for that, or (inverted) small ...


5

You should never use less liquid than is recommended by the manufacturer. If you use less you run the risk of boiling your food dry or burning it since the level of heat to maintain the pressure may increase. Get used to leftovers. You can cook several portions reserve the excess for later use. This will save you time and money. I usually will cook a ...


5

Breast is lean muscle. Add a ton of heat to it and it'll seize up into a dense brick that nobody wants to eat. In that vein, I'm not sure I'd put chicken breast anywhere near a pressure cooker because that's a really great way to get something to 120°C. That's about twice what you want. Ideally we want chicken to hit 63.5°C and stay there for a bit. Here's ...


5

Frying the chicken tends to set the muscle fibers by drawing moisture out. An example of this would be taking a thin (1cm) cutlet and frying it until both sides start to turn golden. It will be pretty dry and hard. Pressure cooking it on the other hand tends to soften the muscle fibers without drawing moisture in (if anything, its putting moisture in). ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible