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Greg Blonder has the best information that I've found on the effects of brining and marinating. In fact, the "food myths" section of his website, has a lot of objective food science. There are several links that are pertinent to your questions. You can see here, that Blonder uses dye to illustrate the effect of brining. He concludes that brining is almost ...


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If by “OK” you mean whether there are food safety issues the answer is no, pressure cookers are safe places to cook chicken. If by “OK” you mean “will it have the exact same texture and flavor and so forth,” the answer is that pressure cooking is more intimately related to boiling and stewing, and is a fast method of doing those sorts of high-moisture ...


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A pressure cooker basically has two settings, high (about 12.5 psi for electric, and 15 psi for stovetop) and low (4 to 7 psi). There are no gauges to accurately specify the pressure in pressure cookers. Pressure canners, on the other hand, are generally larger, and are equipped with accurate gauges so that the user can measure the exact pressure inside the ...


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The problem with pressure cookers is that the food sits on the bottom of the pot and you are unable to stir it while the pressure builds. First, check to insure you are getting a good seal around the lid, assuming you have a seal around the lid. Make sure you have the recommended amount of liquid in the cooker before heating. Make sure you don’t place ...


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