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24

The goal is to keep the surface of the bread from drying out. A wet towel works fine but plastic wrap is cheaper and easier than constantly cleaning wet towels. I have used both methods and haven't noticed a difference in the bread produced. In very dry climates, when I made bread with multiple rises I sometimes had to redampen the towel which was an added ...


15

There is a difference between resting and proofing. Resting allows flour to absorb water and lets the gluten that was formed during kneading to relax. Both of these make it possible to work with the dough. Proofing is letting yeast produce CO2 to raise the dough. Yeast doughs do both in the rest period after they are kneaded. Unyeasted, glutinous, doughs ...


13

Put a serving plate over the bowl. Normal way up so it doesn't slide off and doesn't need washing. Easy! A small amount of surface drying is not going to ruin a bread dough. Think of the millions of bread making machines out there, no plastic wrap required with them, just a reasonably fitting lid that stops air drafts, hence why the towel method worked fine


11

Let me suggest a totally different approach: Why not work with the cool conditions instead of against? You could let the dough proof for a long time, e.g. overnight in the fridge. This allows for a lot less yeast and hence a less yeasty taste, which is usually desired. Also, more complex flavors develop during long proofing times. (There is a reason ...


9

What you are looking at here is an old, almost forgotten method of proofing yeast dough for cold conditions. I have an old cook book1 from ca. 1930, when rooms could be cold in winter. I'd say it's "granny's version of proofing in the fridge". My book says to leave out about 1/4 of the flour, all sugar and, if used, the spices. It does not, however, say to ...


8

A good alternative to either a towel (which you have to wash and is prone to sticking) or plastic wrap (which ain't cheap or good for the environment) is a clear plastic shower cap. It does the same job as plastic wrap, but is reusable. The elasticated edge stretches around even big bowls, providing a snug fit.


8

Run your dishwasher for a few minutes, wait to let the water finish dripping, cover the bowl of dough with plastic wrap and set inside--top rack seems to work the best for me.


8

50C (122F) would be a very high proofing temperature. The thermal death point of yeast is 55C, and you'll definitely hit a point of diminishing returns if you get too hot (most likely, you will have really rapid proofing on the outside of the loaf and an underproofed "core"). I would recommend setting your oven to the lowest temperature, and then once it ...


8

There are three steps in bread making commonly referred to as "Proofing" The first step is also called fermenting (or proofing the yeast, which, I believe, is not what you are asking about). The first rise (also called proofing or bulk fermentation) is about increasing the volume. This is the primary breeding period for the yeasts once they are incorporated ...


8

It sounds like your yeast never really got started, and you may have killed most of it off. Sugar actually retards yeast, and salt kills it, so mixing sugar and salt into the water was not a good thing, in fact it didn't kill off the yeast completely it probably did most of it. So you started off with very little live yeast, which has knock on effects. Cold ...


6

A stiff brush and a set out in bright sun is about all I've felt the need to do with mine. Normally I'll just tap out any extra flour. If I've got a dough that sticks (like last night when I didn't flour enough), then I just take a stiff brush and get all the bits off. If they do get a bit wet, dry them with a towel and then in a warm oven. If I think ...


6

I work with quite wet doughs and bake in a moist environment, but first rise - in a large Tupperware container, lid on but ajar at a corner to let gases escape. second rise - simply dusted with flour. No noticeable skinning at all or loss of oven spring.


6

In both cases, you don't add the recipe's amount of water to the proofed yeast. If your recipe says e.g. 500 g flour, 300 g water and 10 g fresh yeast, you measure these 300 ml water, then pour some of the 300 ml over 10 g of pressed yeast to proof it, adding a teaspoon of sugar if you want it quicker. After that, you mix flour, proofed yeast and the ...


6

In the winter, I usually get fine results proofing in a bowl with a second bowl inverted on top of it, and then putting the whole thing in the oven, turned off, and just the light on. The light bulb usually produces enough heat to keep the inside of my oven at about 90˚F (32˚C?), and that gives me a good rise.


6

I've since figured it out. Gluten free bread is very particular, and the moisture has to be just right. If there's not enough water, the dough is too dense and won't rise. If there's too much water, it will rise, but in the oven, the bubbles bubble through the too, causing the loaf to collapse (I sat and stared and watched it happen). I've since learned what ...


5

I can honestly say I've done this on many occasions. Especially for pizza dough, I defrost in the fridge for 24 hours in a cling filmed bowl which allows it to prove slowly through the day. Never once had an issue with it.


5

The bakers couche is not just floured fabric, it is usually a hard wearing canvas It is used to allow the dough to breath, and hold it's shape while your actual bread moulds are being used in the oven. The all over air gap allow the crust to dry slightly. A dry crust makes it easier to handle and bakes slightly more crispy The flour is there to stop the ...


5

No. The proofing time of a dough is a function of the ratio of yeast and available water, and the temperature of the dough. Notice these are ratios. If you doubled a recipe but didn't double the yeast with it the dough would rise much more slowly. The quantity of dough will only play a role in rise time if the dough is a significantly different temperature ...


4

To go another route -- a bit of forward planning and the use of a fridge might be another way to solve your problem, which is probably one of boredom or inconvenient timing. Instead of making bread over the course of a morning -- say, between 9am and midday -- you can make it over 24 hours in the fridge, using the cold environment to slow the yeast and ...


4

I would check your oven temperature to be sure it's actually right, and also I'm wondering if you're over-proofing your dough, which could possibly result in it deflating when it goes into the oven, or at the very least result in a lackluster rise.


4

It is safe to eat? Almost certainly, especially if you bake it. Your dough doesn't contain anything that will "go bad" in 15 hours at room temperature. Many bread dough recipes containing only flour, water, salt, and yeast are left to proof at room temperature for 12-24 hours, though they generally start with a much smaller amount of yeast. Could it "go ...


4

The answer to your question is fairly complex, and might be best answered by you specifying various stages in the process. However, in general, proofing, stretching, and folding is about gluten and flavor development. Gluten development is about texture and the ability to trap the carbon dioxide produced by yeast. Longer proofing times is also about flavor ...


4

As you know, as the bread proves a matrix of bubbles is formed. And just like blowing soap bubbles, the bigger they get the more fragile the bubbles are. When you bake in pans you can let bread rise a lot as long as you are gentle when you move them into the oven. If you are using bannetons, you can’t let it get so fragile and still survive being turned out....


4

Basic room temperature breads don't prove in 6 or 12 hours, 30 minutes to 2 hours is more typical. The overall process from start to finish including baking may be 6 hours. Sourdough breads and enriched doughs like brioche and challah can take much longer to prove at room temperature. As for calculations no, there's no straightforward time conversion ...


3

I keep mine in the freezer when not in use. This would eliminate the concern about bacteria and keeps it dry and handy for use. When you take it out, give it a tap over the sink and most old flour bits fall off as they have been frozen.


3

I've been letting my pizza dough rise in reusable plastic containers with plastic lids (I coat the bottom and sides of the containers with a bit of olive oil so that the dough doesn't stick). Seems to work just fine, and it's incredibly easy.


3

Preheat the oven to 200 degrees (F), leave it there for 10 minutes. Shut the oven off. Make your dough, and when you're done kneading, the oven will be nice and warm, but not too hot. Works great!


3

I don't think the Australian winter can beat our harsh Canadian winter. One suggestion is to switch then oven light on or to make use of a 60 watts incandescent bulb using an extension wire through the door gasket to keep the oven warm. This will keep the oven warm for an extended period. Or buy a bread maker! (Which I only use for bread kneading only).


3

If you insist on using a damp cloth, you have to make it wet again and again, so this is quite cumbersome especially with long proofing times. Much easier is plastic wrap, which doesn't prevent the dough from rising if you use it to cover a sufficiently large bowl. Tightly wrapping the dough itself obviously won't work. My prefered method for these very ...


3

Try coating the dough ball with a little olive oil or a non-stick spray. I don't know if that's the reason why but it's what I always do when baking bread and I never have a crust form during the rise.


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