11

If you haven't changed your recipe then the problem is in your method, and it sounds like you are over proofing. If your bread expands too much in the final rise it gets over-extended and tends to collapse when scored, exactly as you describe. It's easy to 'get greedy' and try to eke out that much more expansion, but it's actually a very common mistake. ...


5

Mine takes 40 minutes for 500g flour, just under 70% hydration. That's in preheated cast iron, with the lid on (and wetted inside) at 240C for the first 20 minutes, then down to 180. The hard crust seems like too hot to long, possibly too much top heat too. Did you let it cool (almost) fully before cutting and tasting? If I'm impatient, it seems doughy and ...


4

No, an electric oven is not especially well suited as a device for speeding up dough proofing. The closest you can get is by turning the oven on at the lowest level, without preheating, and babysitting it. Provided that you have a standard, large oven, it is unlikely that you kill the yeast - but you really have to pay attention to it, so it is labor-...


3

Surface area. If the container is too wide, larger surface of the dough gets into contact with air. Dough can dry out, yeast/sourdough culture can behave differently (during aerobic fermentation the cells multiply, during anaerobic fermentation the yeast cells produce alcohol instead of multiplying).


3

The recipe you're using sounds nontraditional (the full recipe may be helpful to describe the "why"), but it is almost certainly looking for you to use 1/8 tsp of instant yeast granules directly into the flour. The small amount and use of ice water, rather than warm water are not traditional for bread, but also not unheard of. The method for your ...


3

A pizza stone in your oven really helps with this. Set the oven as low as you can and let it heat for 20 minutes, this will give the pizza stone some time to absorb some heat. Once you turn the oven off it will continue to radiate heat and keep the interior warm for some time. You can also put some metal in the oven to achieve the same effect, although ...


2

I make a sourdough with a very similar recipe to you, perhaps fractionally drier. I bake mine at 230C for 25 minutes covered and 20 minutes uncovered at 200C. On the occasions I forget to turn it down it is verging on burnt. Mine takes a full 24 hours from mixing to baking, so I think you may be rushing the bread. If I knead mine at all, barring the bare ...


2

Apart from the ease of tracking rise, I see two reasons why wider containers can have disadvantages. Increased surface area. While a lid will largely prevent drying out, there still can be some drying and. oxidation caused by the air in the container. Refrigerator space. A narrower container will use up less shelf space for the same volume, which many users ...


2

Primarily what is happening when you add an old dough/pre-ferment/pâté-fermentee to a fresh lot of flour etc is that you are inoculating it with yeast (see definition 1b). This is the equivalent of adding a pre-activated yeast (e.g. sponge) to your flour with some differences. It is also a more direct equivalent of using a biga or poolish. The reason why ...


1

It depends on the electric oven. Mine (manufactured by Neff) has a “Dough Proving” setting, which of course does exactly what you want.


1

With a bit of experimentation and practice, you can probably do this. First of all, my oven has a mode where it only has the light and fan on. That's useful for proofing, because both consume energy, thus generating heat. They're sufficient to maintain the oven around 30-35 degrees, but they would take forever to heat it to that temperature. So when I need ...


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