Hot answers tagged

12

I've never made a baked rice pudding before but I have a couple of guesses at what went wrong... 1. Chosen rice preparation method caused loss of needed starch. First, I don't think the type of rice matters much but I will say that your method differs from the standard method in the US for cooking rice. Generally, we boil the rice with about twice the ...


11

Absent the cake portion, the ingredients are precisely as listed for the Waitrose White and Dark Chocolate Tiramisu. Recipe and image courtesy of Waitrose.com As @ChrisH has suggested, someone may have been modifying the recipe to use ready-made cake, such as a Madeira. Coffee chocolate syrup 200ml strong coffee 1 tbsp demerara sugar 75g plain ...


9

I don't know why this pudding is especially "easy" -- it's similar to other pudding I've made. Perhaps I've always taken the easy road... Salt is a flavor enhancer that makes nearly everything taste better (e.g., enhance sweetness, reduce perception of bitterness. There are many more links on that topic; that was the first reasonable one I saw.) I don't ...


8

Unlike with stovetop recipes, you need not heat the major part of your milk first and then add the starch slurry, you can mix everything while cold. As with all similar microwave recipes, using a wide bowl (preferably with straight sides) is best suited for the job. Use short microwave intervals at medium power, give the mix a quick stir with a whisk every ...


6

If you never prepared the recipe as written (which appears to be the case), you have no basis to tie the way it tastes when doubled to doubling it, rather than to the proportions of the original recipe. Based on many years of making many things in many sized batches, if I double a recipe and want it to taste the same as the original recipe, I double the ...


6

The absolute minimalist version needs 2 ingredients: 1 part short-grain rice, cooked in 4 parts milk If cooked long enough and especially when stirred diligently, the rice will release enough starch to create a creamy, mushy texture, like risotto. But for rice pudding, the rice is usually cooked softer than risotto, which should have a bit of a “bite”. ...


5

A weeping custard is practically always an overheated custard. First wait that your pot has cooled down sufficiently before adding the eggs (somewhere below 70 C is good), temper them instead of throwing them into the pot, and steam using a thermometer, not a clock. Try 85 C as the first goal and see if it works well or needs adjustment.


5

When I wish to cook a pudding or sauce in the microwave, I heat most of the liquid ingredients (roughly 3/4th - 4/5th) in the microwave first. I keep a close eye on it and remove it just before it starts boiling (when I can see the liquid rise up the sides). The starches and sugars (and egg, if I use it) I have thoroughly mixed with the rest of the liquid ...


4

Mixing them together would give you a sauce (if incorporated properly first). It could be an interesting new thing if you need it, but I can't imagine that many places to use it. For me, this is clearly intended as a Tiramisu recipe, slightly non-traditional. Somebody left out the lady fingers. You mix the first ingredients to make moccha, then pour it ...


4

You are probably stirring the pudding too much. Cornstarch starts thickening at about 205°F/95°C. Once the pudding has got to that point and has thickened, stop stirring, otherwise you will interfere with the starch formation that causes the thickening. Using electric beaters probably means you are missing the point when the pudding has thickened and quickly ...


4

This will only thicken by reduction if you leave it on for a really long time. At least 8 hours of simmering, but better to use more than 16, and then you'll get a flavored kaymak. The way it thickened is much more likely to have been raspberry pectin. Many berries have sufficient pectin to thicken when they happen to be used within the optimal sugar and ...


4

Slice bean in half. Use knife blade to scrape seeds out of bean. Scrape seeds from blade into milk as you are heating. Added bonus: toss scraped vanilla pods into a bowl of sugar to create vanilla sugar. Best flavor release of vanilla into a fat-based mixture is achieved during heating.


4

I have used orange as an excellent flavor pairing with pistachio in cakes, biscottis, panna-cottas, custards, etc. I always add the zest of orange and a few drops of orange essence. I've also tried cardamom and saffron with pistachios specially in Indian desserts and it is a very popular pairing in India. Just use a few strands of saffron and powdered ...


4

Instant pudding contains a significant amount of cornstarch. It also contains less significant amounts of disodium phosphate and tetrasodium phosphate. All three of these ingredients will have an effect on cake. Starch absorbs water and gels during baking. This interferes with gluten formation to some degree. If you break down the starch in flour, which is,...


4

update: It seems that the salts used in instant pudding are heat stable (one turns into the other one at 450°C), so it's possible that it might work by following the cooked directions ... but I'd advise a slurry as a backup. You're going to have to add something to fix it. Either more gelatin (to have it set cold), or starch to have it set when boiling. I'...


4

Sometimes it is, sometimes it isn't. Depends on what the manufacturer put inside. The term "pudding" is somewhat broadly defined. It can include eggs, or starch, or both, or even be applied to kinds of dessert which are not made from thickened milk. "Custard" is somewhat more specific, I would insist that a custard is always egg thickened, and that the ...


3

The Industrial Product By way of example, this is the list of ingredients from Jello Vanilla Instant Pudding and Pie Filling mix (a very common brand in the US): Sugar Modified Cornstarch contains less than 2% of Natural and Artificial Flavor Salt Disodium Phosphate Tetrasodium Pyrophosphate (for Thickening) Mono- and Diglycerides (prevent Foaming) ...


3

It is difficult to give an authoritative answer because who knows what a "typical" pie might be like. It might be different for every person you talk to. I will therefore answer just for myself. All of the made-from-scratch pudding pies that I have made have been very similar- a lot of sugar and fat and some starch to make the gel. Usually recipes also call ...


3

I like to put the pudding mix in the bowl first and add the milk a little at a time, stirring or beating well after each addition, until you have smooth emulsion. Once the pudding mixture is smooth, add the rest of the milk and beat with your whisk as usual. Of course an electic mixer will help smooth it out as well.


3

It looks like it could be a variation of this recipe for White Chocolate Mascarpone Cream from Great British Chefs : 50g of white chocolate, (I used Godiva white chocolate pearls) 2 eggs, yolks and white separated 100g of caster sugar 1 vanilla pod 250g of mascarpone cream cheese 150g of dark chocolate, (I used Godiva dark ...


3

After they're stuck to the bowl, lightly "fold" them in. Youtube search for "Folding Ingredients" here...


3

Without the actual recipe to work with it's hard to suggest precise modifications (I don't have the cookbook you mention), but it's quite possible that store-bought puddings have more gelatin and/or gum-like ingredients. Gelatin can be added to a ganache (normally some combination of chocolate and cream, with a low-gloss finish) to achieve a "mirror glaze", ...


2

It could be a bad quality pudding mix, improperly stored pudding mix, or a wrong ratio of mix to milk. In the case of badly dissolving powders, you want to be more careful. You should use the proper amount of liquid - start out with around 1.5 times more liquid than powder by volume, and make a slurry. When the slurry is smooth, mix it under the rest of ...


2

the thickner can be changed, I personally have trouble working with both flour and cornstarch--found this out when making gravey. Instead we use Guar Gum & Xanthan Gum. My cooking classes suggested using tapioca, pectin, gelatin, or arrowroot. quick search on wiki givea a long list. Tradidionally arrow root is suppose to produce a shiney, smoother ...


2

Compared to just the cake batter (molecularly), the pudding (molecularly) traps water in a way that requires greater heat to release ...meaning greater than the amount of heat required to bake the cake. All of these trapped water molecules add up to equal a generally moister cake, but also a cake that requires refrigeration sooner and/or longer, or requires ...


2

Well, no one else has answered, so I will. I made the pudding again, this time I did the "dump" just as the milk and syrup started climbing the sides of the pan. Apparently the tiny temperature difference between that and "almost boiling over" was the difference. The second pudding was completely smooth. The recipe is great and it works just like ATK ...


2

Many chefs and home cooks will push a variety of sauces and custards through a strainer or sieve to achieve a smooth consistency. They same technique can be applied to pudding.


2

Yes, it works without presoaking. You have to cook them for quite a long time until they become quickly translucent, the small ones will need about 30 minutes at a moderate boil. It is not optimal, as the outside will become mushier in this long cooking time, but there are people who don't mind the difference.


2

Unless the package instructions are very different, yes that should be fine. A typical pudding mix will consist of starch the main ingredient, required to thicken the liquid (typically milk) sometimes sugar especially for the "instant" types, others let you add sugar separately flavourings sometimes "the real deal" like vanilla, often artificial. sometimes ...


2

Strictly from a safety perspective? Absolutely. If these are from the same brand then likely the only difference in their formulation is the flavoring agents used. Most of those will be quite similar, and won't react with each other or anything. I'm also pretty sure that powdered pudding mix is quite safe in general. So long as you follow the manufacturer'...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible