20

No. An edible organic liquid that does not dissolve in water, almost by definition, is an oil. That's not the important thing, though. Substances like mineral oil are edible yet non-nutritive; they pass through the body unchanged and would be compatible with any dietary condition. The problem is that, because they are not digestible and not water-soluble, ...


16

Sure it's safe, there's no risk in putting jam in baked goods. It says refrigerate after opening so it doesn't spoil after being left out too long - some people don't realize it needs to be refrigerated after opening because it is stored in the cupboard before opening. The important thing for food safety is to make sure that the pastries are eaten soon ...


12

Yes, that will work just like traditional methods. That's the real deal, it's not even a cheat, it's just smart. BTW, the last line in your question raised my eyebrows. In puff pastry there is no waiting "for the butter to get softer so that it flattens". The butter is flattened (or sliced) with brute strength while the butter is still ice cold. That's ...


7

Yep. No problem at all. This is standard practise for using up left over pastry: jam tarts. Just be careful to let the jam cool down before you bite into it. You don't want molten jam all over the roof of your mouth.


7

It may be a matter of texture, rather than taste. The recipes you link involve putting a wet paste on top of a previously baked croissant. Most baked goods change in texture after sitting out for a few days, mostly because they get drier. If you want to turn bread into crumbs or croutons, for example, you slice it and let it dry out before processing it. ...


6

There are a few things that may be wrong here: Oven not pre-heated enough: how long you need to preheat depends on the oven, but for 200 degrees C I'd give it 20 minutes. If your oven has not pre-heated enough it will be at too low a temperature the butter and will melt rather than turn to steam, which is what gives you lift Oven at too low a temperature: ...


6

If you are only proofing your shaped croissants for 40mins, that could be your problem. Proofing croissants takes a lot longer than proofing bread. you should be proofing the shaped croissants at 78degreesF/25~26degreesC for 2-2.5hours at HIGH humidity. If you don't have a high humid environment, then put one coat of egg wash on right away before you ...


6

A successful pâte à choux / choux pastry depends on a combination of Gluten development Water content Baking environment Let me show you how they work together: The gluten, which helps to trap steam during baking and create the large holes, is developed during the phase where the water-fat-flour mixture is stirred in the pot on the stove. (There is a ...


6

Really, the difference is the process -- full sheets of butter results in layers of the dough which allows it to puff up. But it's a lot of work for a crust that's going to just be bogged down toppings. And if it's too flaky, it has no structural integrity -- it breaks apart as you're trying to eat it, making it pretty useless as a crust. That's part of ...


5

A Google search led to Pepperidge Farm's recipe for Chicken Pot Pie. Since they are the big name in the US for puff pastry, I tend to trust them. They recommend lining the pan with a defrosted, lightly rolled sheet of puff pastry and pricking it with a fork before blind baking covered with aluminum foil for 25 minutes at 400F (~200C). Don't use pie weights, ...


5

First of all, you can make the chocolate pudding in a saucepan (using a chocolate pudding mix), bake the puff pastry by itself in the oven for a few minutes and then spoon the pudding in to the puff pastry to make a delicious chocolate tart. By the way, you can also do the same with fruit, such as apples, cherries, blueberries. You can either make a ...


5

Use younger Brie. You can get Brie in various ages, all the way from barely a week old - which is clean & white all the way through, & almost dry & crumbly, mild as cream cheese [Philadelphia etc]; right up to a year or more - dark yellow & pretty much a gooey liquid with a slightly more solid centre. Obviously, the older/more ripe, the ...


4

Should be safe to heat your jam. I have reheated jams over the stove but never in the oven and have not encountered any problems with it. It is always safe to reheat your jam. Reasons for reheating jams may vary, but be warned: "they may or may not form a gel again once they are re-heated, as over-cooking of pectin can reduce or destroy its ability to form ...


4

I make individual chicken pot pies using fresh puff pastry I made myself. Although it's not absolutely required, I always blind bake the crust bottoms. It makes for a more consistently crispy and flake crust too and bottom, and since I make individual pot pies, the bottom is what people see on their plate when serving. Additionally, the blind baking assures ...


4

I did this, and it didn't turn out so well. My oven was just north of 200 degrees celsius, I didn't want to deal with having the hot stone out of the oven, so I just tossed some sausage rolls on the stone to bake. By the time the top puffed and browned sufficiently, the bottom was, well, pretty burned. Now, these sausages were pretty big bangers (wrapped ...


4

Classic puff pastry absolutely needs a final resting and cooling time in the fridge before you use it for your croissants, palmiers, danishes.... Most recipes give a minimum rest of 30-60 minutes after the last "fold", but overnight in the fridge is absolutely fine. I'm not sure whether storing it for two days might have negative side effects, but up to one ...


4

You will often have recipes that are developed specifically to use up items as they get older and have lost some of their qualities as compared to when they're fresh. Old bread can be turned into Pan Perdu ("Lost Bread", aka "French Toast"), croutons, or bread crumbs. Although any of these dishes can be made from fresh bread, they often work better with ...


4

If they're your first batch, you did great! Can you show us a cut cross-section? A croissant will have "intra-layer" (inside the dough layers) rise and "inter-layer" (between the layers) rise: The intra-layer rise comes from the yeast and moisture action in the dough itself, and the inter-layer comes from the steam generated as the moisture in the butter/...


4

I have made garlic-butter laminated savoury rolls, using roughly the same method as for croissants. It works reasonably well, but I have found that I need to grind the garlic pretty finely. If there are lumps they end up tearing the dough during the lamination. Another issue is that it's even more important to keep everything cold. I work on a chilled marble ...


3

I blind bake the bottom. In my experience, it's the only way to get that dough to cook-- I suppose because liquid filling right next to raw dough keeps it, the dough, from reaching cooking temperature. I have a neat trick for the pie weight-- pennies! They're made of copper so the conduct heat well, and help the blind crust cook from the top down as well. I ...


3

A traditionally made jam is actually a preserve that has, by the copious amounts of sugar involved and often by natural acidity, some added resilience against spoilage compared to a random ingredient - the practically most encountered spoilage mode for jams is mold. A "diet" style jam that uses artificial sweeteners and no or little sugar could conceivably ...


3

I am going to try baking the pie crust on it's own on a baking tray. It's what most restaurants seem to do. Wish me luck.


3

The secret lies in the folding of the dough...You may uses half the butter but you would ultimately have to fold it more before cooking it. The more you fold the dough the more puffy it gets, of course your results will get better with more butter, but in that particular situation, go with the extra folding, you'll get a decent pastry this way.


3

Chilled means refrigerated, and frozen is frozen. The first is for shoppers who want to use the pastry dough right away, and the frozen is for most shoppers who aren't using it immediately. You can freeze puff pastry. In fact, you can freeze and thaw it a couple of times before the freezing/thawing process starts to ruin the dough.


3

The 'puff' effect in puff pastry is produced by an alternation of fat/dough layers. When heated, the water in the dough will become steam and try to scape (hot air go up). Since steam and fat don't mix, this effectively creates pockets of trapped air in between the fat layers. The steam eventually manages his way out leaving behind a layered dry gluten ...


2

Try slicing the butter more thinly and adding it in more layers. I use a handheld cheese slicer for a nice, thin cut. Alternatively, try freezing the butter and grating it, then sprinkling it on in a thin layer when instructed to apply it to the recipe.


2

If you use something other than puff pastry it's not a Torte Milanese anymore, and other kinds of pastry will not hold together in the same way puff pastry does. Puff pastry's layers provide a certain amount of strength and will help keep the shape when sliced, other pastries will crumble much more easily. You can use short crust or any other pastry, it won'...


2

There are two ways that I make puff pastry. The first is Rough Puff Pastry which is a quicker way to make puff pastry and you get about 75% of the rise you get with normal puff pastry. Here is a link for a Rough Puff Pastry that I use. I'd say that the most important tips to take from that recipe is that the butter must be cold when you start and make sure ...


2

So long as the filling is moist (and that's most of the point of a pot pie), the filling is going to steam the underside of the pastry, resulting in the dough cooking more slowly. Starting with a hot filling will help, as will cutting vents to allow the steam to escape, but you also need to try to ensure that the pastry doesn't actually touch the filling. (...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible