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21

It happens more-or-less naturally. Most legumes have a seed structure with two large cotyledons that serve as storage reserves for the developing embryo, which is nestled between them at one edge of the whole structure. This is easily visible in the peanut (which is botanically a legume and not a true nut): The outer pod that splits open serves to protect ...


13

To add something on the practical side: the splitting is done with machines like this: The lentils are poured into it, and come out dehulled and split. From the manufacturer's description, Working Principle The peeled lentil is move forward by propeller and then splitted by the friction among peeled lentil itself, and the friction between peeled ...


4

Starting with more water than you think you need, keeping the lid on for a bit and then stirring a lot while it reduces to the desired consistency should be all you need to do. Don't go far from it once it starts to thicken because it will need too much stirring. You can cook split peas in a slow cooker, but I haven't found the softening very reliable. A ...


3

More than likely another bean that has a firm texture like Chickpeas. People use black beans for vegetarian hamburgers because or their firmness.


3

Why infuse the flavor just during soaking? Unless you are eating them just soaked, after soaking you can cook(fry) the pulses with herbs and spices and that will give them a nice flavor. Most Indian Dal curries are made this way.


3

If your soaking time is 3 hours, and after 3 hours you are not going to cook them.... then you should take them out of the water and put them in an air tight container and keep them in the refrigerator. I usually do this and use my soaked pulses for over 3-4 days. In case you leave them in the water even after their soaking time.. they get extra soft and won'...


2

I eat a lot of beans. I typically boil them for a minute and just let them sit on the stove. That way they soak more evenly and don't sprout. Ideal breeding conditions. I've noticed that in rare cases, when it is really hot (25 C), they start to ferment a bit after half a day or so and the water gets foamy. From my empirical evidence this happens about 1 out ...


2

You probably haven't added enough water. Split peas are dried, cooking re-hydrates them, but only if there's enough to for them to absorb. You need to add at least double the water as peas, a bit like rice in that respect. It's also possible you have old peas, or they are a variety that simply needs a longer cooking time. Hard water can also slow down ...


2

No, this is a common myth. If you want to test it, you don't "try once with salt", you divide the same batch of beans and cook them both, one with salt and one without, under the same conditions, and repeat. This is what a food author did, although he seems to not have repeated the experiment: http://www.seriouseats.com/2016/09/salt-beans-cooking-soaking-...


1

I had that happen one time with my yellow split peas. No matter cooking time they stayed 'gritty' like you said. I came to the conclusion (after reading up) that the batch had been stored far too long and/ or heat damaged during storage.


1

I don't think this is true. If anything, salt would help the bengal gram (chickpea or garbanzo bean) soften sooner because it would absorb moisture more easily and therefore soften sooner. If you soak the bengal gram overnight (you should for taste/texture/ease of cooking) then salting during the soak would definitely not cause an increase cooking time, as ...


1

You can cook them in a pressure cooker. This will soften them in a relatively short amount of time. Another option is to soak them longer in advance of the cooking (for a day or so) in water, and baking soda...


1

After soaking, I thoroughly rinse the beans, drain and then pat dry with paper towels and store them in an air-tight container in the refrigerator. Then they need to be cooked within the next one or two days or they don't smell fresh. If that happens, I throw them away and start over.


1

Water alone is often a poor carrier of flavor. Oil, salt and even a sugar base can maximize an herb or spice impact. These, however, cannot be recommended for soaking. Pulses can toughen up with salt or acid during soaking or cooking. The trick is to add flavor near the end of pulse cooking time long enough to penetrate. Here is where flavored salt or oil ...


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