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18

Salt is fundamental to our sense of taste, leaving it out will definitely affect the flavor of a pie (or a cake, or a steak, or whatever) negatively. However, leaving it out shouldn't have affected the texture, you would need to use much more salt than I imagine your pie filling recipe called for to affect the texture at all.


16

tl;dr - Maybe salt was responsible for your texture problem, but it's iffy. Salt is usually thought of as a flavoring agent only, but salt does some serious jobs in the chemistry of cooking. It's worth looking at some options for what this awesome rock does to your custard (and being a cooked mixture of dairy, sugar and eggs, pumpkin pie filling is a ...


8

The pumpkin flavor you're likely looking for is nothing more than the spices that are added to pumpkin "stuff": cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, etc. If you attempt to do an extract to achieve "pumpkin essence", you will not be happy with the results. I have been a home brewer (beer, wine, mead, etc.) for 20+ years and have seen many attempts from various brewers ...


7

Drain them first. Your concerns are spot-on, and if you measured and then drained them, you would end up with less than 1 cup of yams. Generally, you can tell be cause the recipe called for 1 cup of drained yams, not 1 cup of yams in their sauce. Drain them, but double check that you won't need the liquid for anything later on in the recipe... That's a ...


6

Raw pumpkins are very hard and more or less inedible. They are similar to potatoes: you have to cook them before you can eat them. Most pumpkin varieties are not as stringy as spaghetti squash, at least their edible portion isn't. The fibers in which the seeds hang are not eaten, you eat the hard part (after cooking it to make it soft). It is also possible ...


6

Admittedly our carving pumpkins in the UK are smaller than yours, which may affect the texture, but this year and last I made: three been and pumpkin chilli pumpkin tagine pumpkin spice cupcakes pumpkin curry pumpkin, pepper and mushroom fajitas All of these get most of their flavour from other ingredients. All were successful. The chilli, curry, and ...


5

To understand the Food.com recipe you referenced, I compared it to the Libby's recipe which sets the benchmark for pumpkin pies. Food.com Libby's Raw measurements Pumpkin 6 c 2 c Sugar 2 c 0.75 c Eggs 8 2 Dairy 4.5 c 1.5 c Pseudo-bakers percentages (eggs as ratio of cups ...


5

The most common, almost canonical brand of canned "Pumpkin Pie Filling" in the US is Libby brand. While the canned pumpkin puree is just canned pumpkin, the Libby "Canned Pumpkin Pie Filling" also has sugar syrup, natural flavoring, salt and spices. So I would add the spices, salt and condensed milk in @Phrancis's recommendation to 30 ounces of pumpkin puree ...


5

In the US, Jack-o-lanterns are typically common field pumpkins and many of the larger and specialty ones are actually gourds. I cannot talk to some of the gourds, so if you are looking at some of the white ghost pumpkins and they very warty ones, use may vary. But the common field pumpkin is certainly edible, but not usually be best choice. The are hard, ...


5

We never peeled them growing up. We'd coat them in some oil, roast them in the oven (stirring occasionally), then season them when they came out.


4

When I was a kid we grew pumpkins for the pigs to eat during the winter. Most of the seeds were dried and sold, but we also ate some. This is how we shelled them: Clean and dry the seeds. (No need to wash, just separate seeds from pulp by hand). Hold the seed between fingers similar to a guitar pick (plectrum). Insert the seed between your front teeth and ...


4

This post is old, but surprised nobody has mentioned Kakai pumpkins. If you do gardening, just plant Kakai pumpkins. The seeds are grown without the shells. Can't get easier than already shelled.


4

This is speculation, since I have never done it, and I don't think it is practical or more effective than just cooking with pumpkin puree for these applications. If I were to try this, I would: Roast pumpkin (just the flesh, not the seeds or peel) to develop the roasty flavors. You would roast it dryer than you would for pureeing, maybe to a leathery ...


4

According to the National Center for Home Food Preservation (emphasis added): Freezing is the easiest way to preserve pumpkin, and it yields the best quality product. Select full-colored mature pumpkin with fine texture (not stringy or dry). Wash, cut into cooking-size sections and remove seeds. Cook until soft in boiling water, in steam, in a ...


4

Since nobody has answered yet, I took a shot at this one from the opposite direction: searching for solutions to a too-dense pie hoping to find some steps that were "wrong" for the questioner but would be right for your opposite goal of denser pie. This is how one remedied his too-dense pie; in the link is the recipe from which he made his modifications: ...


4

Either boiling or roasting would work, but roasting may be less work (since you don't have to peel and dice the squash). Roasting may also give you better flavor. Here is one recipe for homemade pumpkin puree, from Alton Brown, but the basic technique is very simple: Cut the squash in half and scoop out the seeds and loose pumpkin... erm... guts Roast the ...


4

As André Soltner is basing his recipe from recollections of growing up in Alsace, it may be that it was not the garden pumpkin, as it's known and which resembles the large US variety most familiar as decoration. Several of the many grown in the Alsation region might be better suited to soups and other recipes. The Hokkaido, similar to Hubbard, has a very ...


4

I'd be interested to see the version of the pie you're making. I found a version on the America's Test Kitchen website that calls for candied yams in addition to the pumpkin and the recipe actually says "1 cup drained candied yams from 15-ounce can" So, if the rest of the recipe looks like it's the same recipe you're using, it looks like they may have ...


4

Whether or not "you" specifically choose to de-hull pumpkin seeds before grinding them to make flour, pumpkin seed shells are certainly edible, both raw and roasted. The first source you name certainly seems to be referring to pre-shelled pumpkin seeds, not just because they mention it being green, but also because their image of finished pumpkin seed flour ...


4

No, pumpkin will not shred the way spaghetti squash does. That's pretty much distinctive to the spaghetti squash, and I don't know of any substitute. The flavor is generically squashy, so if you were to serve a sauce on top of a slice of pumpkin or cubed pumpkin it would taste just fine. Not the same, but similar enough to be edible. The texture will be ...


4

You will not be able to follow a real spaghetti squashh recipe with pumpkin. If you try to gouge it with a fork, you will get grooved pumpkin. My suggestion would be to use a spiralizer. Cut the raw pumpkin into pieces which are suitable for your spiralizer, and make pumpkin-spaghetti out of it. Then steam them. The taste should be pretty comparable to ...


4

Pumpkin pie where I come from (USA) is made with these big round orange squashes (we call them "pumpkins", but I believe that term is used for different things in some other countries). Unlike butternut squash, or other members of the squash family, our pumpkins aren't considered to be delicious cooked by themselves, and so people here pretty much only use ...


4

Some ideas: I like to do do pumpkin gnocchi. The dryer the pumpkin, the better, since you will need to add less flour and get a lighter result. It has a lovely sweet taste compared to potato gnocchi and goes really well with sage and butter or blue cheese sauce. The recipe in the link is just suggestive. My approach is to add an egg yolk and to keep adding ...


4

In Mediterranean cuisine there is a dessert made with pumpkins. You cut the pumpkin into large cubes, add sugar to them and wait overnight. They will release some liquid, and the next day you can cook them until they're soft and no liquid is left. Then you can add shredded coconut and/or walnuts and/or tahini to serve, depending on your taste. Lots of fiber ...


4

(simple answer) I suggest finding a lasagna recipe without pumpkin in it. Lasagna is a simple recipe and easily adaptable. You can add and remove ingredients to your liking as long as you keep the basic structure of the lasagna (pasta/sauce layers). Make certain that if you add ingredients to the lasagna, that they will be already cooked or can be baked ...


4

A straightforward replacement would be butternut squash, which can usually be going in either pieces or puree in the frozen section of a grocery store. (In my experience, it is much more common than pumpkin!) It has a very similar flavor profile, texture, and cook time. Acorn squash or a similar "winter squash" could also work, but would involve more prep ...


4

Foods which would have a similar texture to pumpkin, either chunked or pureed, are root vegetables such as carrots, parsnips, turnips, or rutabagas. (You will have to adjust the parboiling times to ensure the correct consistency.) For a puree, mashed peas, e.g., would be an additional option.


3

Hopefully this helps. I found this recipe on the Food Network which has a section about making pumpkin pie filling from scratch. This is what is added to the pumpkin: One 14-ounce can sweetened condensed milk 1/2 cup whipping cream 2 tablespoons cornstarch 2 tablespoons molasses 2 tablespoons canola oil 1 tablespoon ground cinnamon 1 teaspoon ground ...


3

Centrifugal dehullers are used commercially; something like this. Basically, you use a spinning rotor to throw seeds at a hard wall at about 100 mph (45 m/s). This cracks the shell, and releases the seed. All that reamains then is to separate seed from broken hulls. The same process may be used effectively for oats, rice, sunflower, pumpkin and etc. seeds. ...


3

If you grow naked-seeded or hulless seeded pumpkins, you don't have to remove the hulls. One variety is Kakai as mentioned above. Other varieties include Styrian, Lady Godiva, Streaker and Eat-all. After harvest, just cut open the pumpkin and you'll find green, tender seeds.


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