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13

Pie and tart are regional (North American versus Western European) terms for essentially the same thing. Some will argue that the pans make the difference (see below), but I don't buy that story. There are some stylistic differences that appear quite often, but nothing that makes them truly different things: Pies tend to be deeper, and have more filling ...


8

Inferring that the question is, "How do I tell when the quiche is done?" The answer is to check the internal temperature, which should be between 165°F(74°C) and 185°F(85°C).


8

The crust would get soggy. If you want to make a quiche in advance, you can make the shell and blind bake it, if required. Wrap the shell in plastic wrap and refrigerate it over night. You can make the filling custard and have it in a bowl (I would actually use a sealable container). Eggs and cream are highly perishable, so you want to refrigerate them ...


7

Yes, you absolutely can. I do it all the time, in both quiche and omelets. It does need to be cooked which is most easily done in the microwave. Prep by removing much of the large stem, diving into little 'tree' segments, and placing in a microwave-safe dish or bowl. Add just a bit of water, not much, just about a tablespoon, to create steam. Cover with ...


7

You may wish to seed the tomatoes, removing the gelatinous part containing the seeds, which is mostly water, and very little flavor. You want to use only the meaty, fleshy part of the tomato in a quiche. Depending on the size of your tomatoes, scooping the seeds out with a melon scoop, cutting out the seed sections, or simply squeezing out the seeds will ...


6

Stick a knife directly in the center from above and when it comes out clean ( no uncooked egg mixture, very small amount of oil or clear liquid ok) it's done. Also 165-185F internal temp also measured directly in the center.


6

There are a couple variations that if you're lucky might be cheaper: Beaufort and Comté. (I've only actually tried Comté, but I've seen Beaufort listed along with it and Gruyère.) A bit farther away are Emmentaler and Jarlsberg. They both have the Swiss cheese flavor but aren't quite as firm nicely aged. Beyond that there's simply all the varieties of (...


6

You need less cream for a firmer consistency. The eggs are the part that set during the cooking process. The cream adds moisture and fat, both of which make it softer and runnier.


5

If you want to be faithful to the French terminology, a quiche (lorraine) does not contain cheese. Ever. It's not even a matter of being "classic" or "authentic", putting cheese on a tarte is very common, but it's just called differently if you do (namely tarte). Have you ever tried an actual French quiche (i.e. without cheese)? Maybe you will like it. ...


5

Honestly, it looks like it's just too high a percentage of egg... and maybe not enough cheese. I don't know that it can't work with that much egg but most of the recipes I've found just now use much more dairy to egg and have other ingredients to make them creamy. For comparison purposes, you're using less than a quarter cup of liquid to two eggs or 1.5 ...


4

You never can tell how much water a tomato will give off, it depends on the variety, how much water it had when it was grown, how thick you slice it, etc. You're best off hedging your bets by following @saj14saj's advice, and roasting your tomatoes beforehand. You could also part dry them in the oven over a longer period, for instance while you are at work....


3

Creme Fraiche is more comparable to sour cream than it is to heavy cream, and it sounds like what you have is if anything even further from cream. You could certainly make a tasty quiche with it, but it would probably require the addition of additional liquid, and there's a chance it won't turn out well. If you're OK with risks and experimentation, go for it!...


3

In the normal cooking time of a quiche (20 to 30 minutes), the crust doesn't really get soggy from the filling, even if it is quite liquid, as is expected for quiche Lorraine. So, you can without problem cook your quiche without first blind-baking the crust. The difference will be in the crispness of the crust: if you try to get it crispy, you should prebake,...


3

Flaky pie pastry works beautifully for quiche. You can improve the texture with two techniques. The first is "blind-baking," or a partial pre-bake to toast the crust lightly. The other is to brush a wash of egg white onto the crust before blind-baking.


3

According to the title of the video, which is all I looked at (my French not being that good), you are making a pate brisee which is a particular kind of pastry crust. This pastry relies on solid fat in its construction method, so that it can be in little clumps in the dough. Then, it melts during baking forming a crumbly crust. You will not achieve ideal ...


3

Are you just using eggs for your filling? Most quiche fillings are a custard, with milk, cream, or other dairy as well as eggs, and often cheese as well. It sounds like you are over beating your egg or custard mixture, and inadvertently incorporating air. In general you want minimum air in a quiche filling, so whisk or stir it briefly until it comes ...


2

I just thought I should mention coconut oil as another substitute for fats that are solid at room temperature. I prefer it to the other alternatives mentioned because it is vegetarian, and much less processed then shortening. It should be able to work in your dough much the same way as shortening - though its temperature range is a bit narrower than ...


2

From watching food shows and trying myself. If you cut tomatoes in slices and salt them, let them sit for 20 minutes, it will draw out the extra water. It works for me. Good luck!


2

I cooked just until the middle stopped wobbling like when I make crème brulee. I agree with Catija's assessment that you probably need a higher dairy:egg ratio. Most of the quiche recipes in Julia Child's The Way to Cook call for three large eggs plus enough milk or cream to make 1 1/2 cups of custard, and I've found that to be pretty reliable. However, I ...


1

Add 1 Tab of flour in egg mix. That works for me. Check Moosewood cool books Quiches. Easy and my go-to for 38 years.


1

The water is likely from over-heating the eggs. They'll become rubber+water if you overheat them, just as badly as if you overcooked it the first time. But quiche, pizza rustica, frittata, spanish tortilla, and similar are good at room temperature or just barely warmed through. I would thaw it in the fridge overnight (24hrs would be better), so that ...


1

I would use a pizza stone (preferred) or preheated baking sheet underneath the quiche, similar to the method sometimes used to make the bottom of pie crusts crisper. Put the stone or baking sheet in the cold oven and preheat the oven for at least 30 minutes before adding the quiche. This probably won't completely solve your problem, though. Unless the quiche ...


1

I'd go even further - I never cook the broccoli before I use it in a quiche. It is all about the size of broccoli you use: large chunk = long cooking time, small chunks = short cooking time. For a finely chopped broccoli I would go for 30-40 min in 180C. So all you have to do is finely chop the broccoli before you use it in a quiche. You can do it either ...


1

Did you overcook it? Overcooking will often cause eggs to weep not-insignificant amounts of liquid. You can see this trivially if you overcook scrambled eggs - you'll get essentially "egg curds in soup".


1

I vote for lard, which makes a very tender and crispy crust. If you want to make your meal a bit lighter, there are similar concoctions without any crust: French flan or Italian sformato. With these recipes it is important to cook them slowly in a cool oven, but they provide quiche-like satisfaction without the highly calorific crust.


1

In my eyes, this is a very clear case of overbaking. As SAJ14SAJ says, a quiche is basically a custard. The eggs in a custard work the same way no matter if you are making a quiche, a creme caramel, or a creme patisserie. They have lots of different proteins, which float free in the liquid part of the egg while the eggs are raw. When you start heating ...


1

A ceramic pie dish should be fine, even superior. The only thing you'd change is if you're blind baking the crust (some do, some don't) before filling it, you'd want to take it out of the oven sooner because the pan will retain heat. EDITED TO ADD: Flaky pastry, in my experience, is the normal crust for a quiche.


1

I think you should change your recipe for the royal--- you're using "half-and-half" and milk --- so something like 3 parts milk to 1 part cream. You should try using just heavy cream for the royal. It's not a health food--and if you want to be healthier, just eat a smaller piece. Also the pre-baking of the crust may be needed, depending on thickness of ...


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