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10

The differences are as follows: Quinoa is a pseudocerial coming from goosefoot wikipedia. It is one of the trendy "superfoods" because it has a very high nutritional value ánd is gluten free. I have always used it as a grain substitute and do not know if it's any good as the main ingredient for a burger. Quorn is a meat substitute made of mycoprotein from ...


6

Cooking grains in soup is an effective way to thicken it, but quinoa is probably not the best choice. Quinoa has saponin in it, a bitter tasting phytochemical which has been known to irritate the stomach. Much of the quinoa sold has been presoaked to get rid of much of the saponin, but some may remain which is why you boil it separately and discard the water....


4

The issue with quinoa being soaked and rinsed is not a safety concern. It is more a matter of flavor. It is not dangerous. Some people just find un-rinsed qinoa to be bitter. In fact, for the most part, that bitter flavor is the majority of the interaction these saponins have with the body. This article goes into some more detail: Questionable Quinoa: ...


4

Quinoa is cooked exactly like rice. In fact- if you have a rice cooker you can use that and not worry about it. Your procedure is ok. This is the way I make my quinoa. Toasting grains in oil before steaming them is delicious and results in grains that are more nutty and more individual. Rice is nice this way so there is less risk of making rice paste. If ...


4

Air pockets. It's why wormy beans/grains will also float - the surface tension of the water prevents it from entering into small crevices. If you have cracks or holes in the grains that contain air, the whole ensemble will less dense than the surrounding water and will therefore float.


4

Quinoa is cooked much like rice- in fact it can be cooked nicely in a rice cooker. The 2/1 ratio is correct. As with rice, the goal is to steam the grain. You should be cooking on low heat after it boils and is covered and you shouldn't be frequently opening the pot while it cooks. I haven't had success adding water later in the cooking. It doesn't get a ...


3

As Sobachatina said, it's cooked like many grains, and behaves very similar to rice. You could try continuing the steaming method, and if it does not get done by the time all the water has turned to steam, start it with a bit more water. Sobachatina's suggestion of a tight lid is also worth considering, but pay attention to the pot then, so you don't get ...


3

You are unable to do anything about it. The bitterness in commercially prepared flour is from the fact that they don't thoroughly rinse the saponin from the outside of the seeds. Once it's milled in, there really isn't anything you can do about it, doubly so when making a bread that is basically flour and water. So you have two ways to fix it. One is grind ...


3

In its homecountries of Bolivia and Peru, few people have fridges to keep their cooked quinoa, and having leftovers stay overnight (or longer) is a fact of life. Also facts of life there are foodborne infections, as many tourists visiting there will tell you in graphic detail... As a cooking instructor I would always advise to use refrigeration, or other ...


3

There's some good advice here: http://www.savvyvegetarian.com/blog/advice/food-safety-tips-food-spoilage In summary, everything goes bad, quinoa is no exception. To be safe, refrigerate when possible. Leaving food at room temp is asking for trouble.


2

Getting the best results often means choosing the right pan. Quinoa to no more than 2inches/5cm depth dry with room to double. Good heavy base that will hold heat, also makes a big difference: can turn off pot for last 2min of cooking (or when water is nearly gone) with a towel under lid. No drips making grain soggy. If you must stir to check whether ...


2

If you want to replace 100% of gluten containing flour in a recipe, you will probably need to vary the amounts of the other ingredients, the cooking time and the cooking temperature. It doesn’t behave the same as gluten containing flours in the oven. Every recipe is different, but some very general rules of thumb are (for which there are probably just as ...


2

I have used quinoa flour in various recipe and it would have a similar effect as the brown rice flour, though its taste would differ. I would recommend against substituting it (at least not 1:1) for the tapioca flour as that is likely working as a kind of binding agent to some extent. Experimentation may yield different results based on the ratio, but also ...


2

I'd recommend just using regular flour. Since this is not a GF recipe, the quinoa flour is likely added for nutritional reasons, including increasing the protein content. If that is not a concern of yours, just use regular flour. Using whole wheat flour would give you a different flavor profile.


2

Quinoa and Amaranth are from the same family and are quite similar in makeup and constitution. You’ll probably want to add some stabilizers and extra binding power to make up for the lack of gluten. This recipe for amaranth bread adds rice flour, tapioca starch, arrowroot, and xanthan gum - which in my opinion is a bit of overkill. I would probably stick ...


2

You should always try to first bring hot quinoa to room temperature and follow the rest which you already mentioned. That works great, else if you try to pack it when it like burning hot, then the steam kind of stays in the packed room which later creates moisture and later spoils the food even though you keep it in the refrigerator. Best worked for me is ...


2

Cook it as usual nice and fluffy. No one appreciates doughy quinoa. Two choices: A.at holding-temp, weigh down with a plate to just fit inside pan. scoop out servings carefully. B. when just finished cooking. pack into ramekins etc tightly and rewarm. oiling may be necessary for ease of release.


2

You could... maybe add some starch?


1

Wow, i was just googling the opposit. I was so happy to buy cheaper quinoa a costco (ottawa) yesterday and they have this new brand from canada. It happens to be "glutinous" quinoa. Best for hot dishes as it sticks. It was great in mexican food but not the best in my salad since i prefer dry quinoa in salads. I'm not sure where you are from but if you can ...


1

To make it sticky, I would cook it with coconut milk. Try with different ratio of water and coconut milk to get the perfect consistency and taste (to you).


1

Some plant products carry a good amount of lecithin, which is itself a potent emulsifier, so there is less need to add an extra emulsifier. Soy beans and sunflowers are both commercially exploited sources of lecithin isolates, so one can assume they have a lot. Lecithin is also contained in eggs in a high concentration, and the reason eggs are often ...


1

Any sealed container for room temperature Red Quinoa to refrigerator-be it plastic storage, bowls with plastic wrapping; have all worked excellent for me. Red Quinoa is always the best in terms of separating and not clumping-which was my experience with Pearl Quinoa.


1

Okay. I tried this two different ways. First I tried just combining the ingredients without the simmering and sautéing step. The flavors didn't seem to come together as well and it did take longer for the liquid to absorb into the bulghur. So then I tried just adding the chopped onion without sautéing first but I did simmer the tomato products. This worked ...


1

As you stated above that you have used every possible method, i use simple method for grain sprouting. First i wash grain properly to remove dust and then soak them in normal temperature water for at least time mentioned in recipe.The first step in preparing quinoa is to remove the saponins, a process that requires soaking the grain in water for a few hours, ...


1

If the seeds that were used were poorly washed prior to milling, then there is nothing you can do about it. What was the brand? Now there is a chance that the taste you are getting is from the enzymes, which will disappear when you toaste the quinoa prior to using. Try pre-toasting the flour in a pan and let us know i that helps. I would always pre-toast ...


1

I left cooked quinoa seasoned with veggies overnight. The temperature in my basement home was 7 degrees last night. I found the quinoa not smelling strange and the texture not changed. So I reheated it and had it for lunch. Well, maybe when temperatures are higher in summer it would be wise to refrigerate cooked quinoa. If animal products have been added to ...


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