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14

The short answer is yes, they can come in a curly form. There are several types of fresh noodle used in Rāmen, which can be classified mainly according to thickness and shape. Noodles are classified in shape into the straight sutorēto-men (ストレート麺), the curly chijire-men(縮れ面), and the more rare flat hirauchi-men(平打ち麺) . With the exception of the flat type, ...


10

I've done the experiment suggested by derobert: Added hot water to the ramen noodles in my microwaving container Microwaved for 2 minutes (I usually pour off the water and start over after one, but I wanted to give this the best chance that I'd get a result.) Poured the water into a glass container (I used my french press, which looks a bit like a chemistry ...


10

Fat floats, so if you dump the water into a bowl and let it sit for a bit, you can see how much floats to the top. You can then remove the fat in any of the normal ways (this is exactly the process you use to defat a stock or a soup), and measure it. Of course, I quickly looked up the nutrition information on ramen, and it has ~7g fat, ~3g saturated. An egg ...


8

Perhaps you could consider straining it twice? Use your strainer the first time to get out the larger particles and then do a second time with the cheesecloth so that it doesn't get clogged as easily. I imagine this wouldn't be any faster, but you'd have to fight with the clogged cheesecloth less.


8

Here are two really good, really easy ways to make ramen with eggs: The easiest way is to just boil an egg and toss it in. If you eat this a lot, you can boil a few and keep them in the fridge. They should stay good for about 3-5 days. If you like liquid yolk in your soup, soft boil the eggs (boiled between about 3 and 9 minutes, to taste). Just cook your ...


6

The obvious downside is safety: each time you go through a heating and cooling cycle, your food will spend time in the danger zone. It's hard to guess exactly how long, but if it's a large volume and it takes an hour to cool to 40F and 15 minutes to heat back up to 140F, and you use the conservative end of the safe time range (2 hours) you might have a ...


6

Usually it's best to cook dried noodles in boiling water, and drain and rinse them in cold water when they are done. This does a couple of things: helps ensure that the noodle is equally cooked all the way through (instead of getting overcooked on the outside by the time the centre is cooked). by using separate water, you don't fill your broth with starch, ...


6

The temperature needs to be high enough, that's all. 450°F should work fine. (2-5 hours is a little silly, since the reaction is pretty quick once the baking soda itself is up to temperature.) If you want to check that everything's gone okay, you can weigh the powder before and after. If it's converted properly, its mass should decrease to 63% (EDIT: fixed ...


4

I once made an egg-based pasta recipe, meant to be spaghetti, which I didn't allow to dry to rest long enough. Texturally, the result was identical to ramen (even without the kansui, or bicarbonate solution) because the noodles were cooked so moist. The pasta stayed pretty curly after cooking, most likely because it wasn't dried over a rack; it was just ...


4

Fine mesh sieve is the usual way, but the way you describe it, yours is not fine enough. Look in professional stores for a "chinois", this is the kind of sieve you need. But yes, it will take a long time. In classic restaurants, the stock will be cleared before going through the chinois. This is done by floating a rack of eggwhite which bounds the stray ...


4

I like to use a lint free surgical towel. It works much better than cheesecloth and is not as slow as a coffee filter.


4

I run mine through a colander first, then through a sieve. Then I lay a single layer of cheese cloth over the top and press down wirh a spoon so its submerged a little all the way around. Put it in the fridge overnight. Next morning remove cheese cloth, which takes most of the coagulated and chilled fat with it. Run through clean folded cheese cloth in ...


4

Baking turns bicarbonate of soda into a weak form of lye - sodium carbonate, as you said. It basically makes it a stronger alkali. The actual baking process is safe, but the resulting lye is an irritant and you should avoid getting in on your skin, and definitely avoid it getting it in your eyes. The difference in texture and colour is noticeable after ...


3

Jefromi's stated the important food safety issue. I do think there could also be differences in the way the food cooks and breaks down. One thing I'm thinking of here is the way gelatin dissolves and breaks down differently when reheated compared to when it cooks originally. Stews taste differently on the second day partly because of the way the gelatin,...


3

The best way to strain stock is actually to siphon it off, that way you don't agitate the liquid as you pour the whole lot out. It's a simple process: Find a vessel to hold the strained stock and place the stockpot above it at a higher level. (I normally put a wide bowl in the sink and then the pot on the counter top; I've also used a stack of cookbooks ...


3

I make it all the time with egg. Learned to make it this way while on a tour in Asia. Here is my method: Bring water and flavoring to a boil. Add noodles, bring back to a boil. Crack an egg in a separate bowl, add some water (a couple tablespoons) to it and scramble it with a fork or chopsticks. While stirring the pot slowly add in the egg. Remove from heat ...


3

If you want a clear stock, cheesecloth (and a healthy dose of patience) is the way to go. I would speculate that you might get better performance by first getting the big bits out by using a colander, and then go on to the fine-mesh sieve, finishing off with another pass through the sieve lined with cheesecloth. At that point, you can also use a little ...


3

Freezing broth has no ill effects. I would think that you could just emulsify the fat by boiling the broth when you take it out of the freezer. Boiling it again will lose some liquid, though. Or an immersion blender could be useful for resetting the emulsion, if needed. Your biggest worry is making sure the broth doesn't dry out in the freezer. Make sure ...


3

160 °C (320 °F) for 1-2 h worked for me once, but higher temperatures should not hurt the process. If you are starting with dry sodium hydrogen carbonate, the mass should reduce to 63 % of the starting mass (more reduction in case of wet starting material). Explanation for the mass loss number: You are converting two equivalents of sodium hydrogen ...


3

We don't know since we don't have the exact recipes, but I have a few good guesses. Pork broth is made by boiling pork bones, so the thickness comes from the extracted collagen. Chicken broth is usually made by boiling chicken carcasses, which is mostly meat and bones. That will make a lighter broth since there's not a lot of fat. I came across a recipe ...


2

The late-night noodle snack we make goes like this: Boil water, dump noodles in, stir a bit as the noodles soften When the water boils again, take the noodles off, dump the water and rinse the noodles with cold water. Every Chinese person I've ever seen make ramen always rinses the noodles, the idea is to get rid of some of the oil that the noodles were ...


2

Very simply, all of them work. The major driver of what tastes good to you is expectations. If you are accustomed to eating soup with a certain taste, and expect it to taste that way, then any time you prepare the soup with something different, it won't taste good to you. But there is no rule to define that some liquids taste good as a soup base and ...


2

I think I’ve answered my own question. Since this ramen liquid has elements of both stock and broth, I’m going to call it soup. And I’m sticking with it!


2

According to Wikipedia, "The dried noodle block was originally created by flash frying cooked noodles, and this is still the main method used in Asian countries, but air-dried noodle blocks are favored in Western countries." (from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Instant_noodle ) So I don't know where you are, but if it happens to be a "Western country", ...


2

None of those items need to be heated to be safe, even if you eat them daily. Vermicelli is just pasta, made from wheat four, rice flour or mung bean flour. It may not be palatable under-cooked, but it won't hurt you unless you are sensitive to that ingredient. And if you are sensitive, cooking it won't help anyway.


2

Is slow cooking in an oven safe with long cooking times might be relevant or even, for this task, a viable method. An oven offers some thermal buffering even if the heating element cycles, and can be monitored with an oven thermometer. Bringing the contents to the same temperature the oven is set to before putting them in might help.


1

Aromatics are your friend, especially in vegetarian cooking. Try loading your broths up with onion and shallot while simmering. instead of, or in addition to, sauteing your garlic, ginger and soy add them straight to your broth and they'll change up the flavor profiles immensely. Additionally, try sauteing the whole mixture in a small amount of oil before ...


1

I'm not aware of any vegetarian Chinese soup stock. Typical ramen stock is "Superior stock" I think. See this link for a reference recipe: https://www.homemade-chinese-soups.com/soups-stocks.html My advice would be, if you want to make something that is vegetarian, AND, DELICIOUS then you should throw away your idea of making something Chinese styled and ...


1

Tsukeman ramen basically means "Dipping Ramen" which consists of a bowl of ramen noodles and a bowl of broth (dipping sauce) and other edibles such are meat and vegetables. I have been using David Changs' Momofuku book to create ramen broth, tare, and pork. He has a recipe to make the ramen noodles in there but suggests if you don't have the time just to go ...


1

I don't recall ever seeing regular onions in my ramen in southern Japan (but scallions, maybe--it was many years ago, so it's hard to remember). As for topping oil, the only one I ever saw was "Chinese fire oil", which was usually provided on the side for addition at the customer's discretion. I loved the heat from the fire oil but could only stand at most ...


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