5

You can eat raspberries. You can chew them as much as you like, without dying. Your teeth (unless yours are suffering great defects) are perfectly capable of crushing the seeds.


5

Its probably pretty natural for there to be tiny little bugs in the fruit. One thing you can do is soak them in a bath of cold water, lemon juice and maybe a splash of white vinegar, but not too much as you don't want them to take on that vinegar taste. You can spray them down with baking soda and lemon mixed with water as well. This will help draw the bugs ...


5

As far as flavor profiles go, almonds and macadamia nuts work well. But my all time favorite is hazelnuts (filberts). I have heard of recipes that call for pecans. While I absolutely love pecans I haven't tried them with raspberry and white chocolate. I would like to say the flavor combination should be good but I can't quite wrap my head around it.


4

Pits from stone fruits trees from the Prunus genus such as cherries, apricots and peaches can pose a risk of cyanide poisoning if crushed and ingested in significant amounts. From foodsafety.govt.nz CYANOGENIC GLYCOSIDES - INFORMATION SHEET THE COMPOUNDS Cyanogenic glycosides or cyanoglycosides account for approximately 90% of the wider group of plant ...


4

I’ve made muffins with fresh raspberries. Increase the amount of flour you’re using, to help absorb the extra moisture. (I add somewhere in the range of 20-30g for 12 normal-size muffins.) Cut the berries up into smaller pieces, put the pieces on paper towels, and cover with more paper towels. This soaks up some of the juice, and distributes it better ...


4

Raspberries are going to leak a little and stain the batter of any muffin they are put into. Muffins with whole berries are going to have reduced shelf life due to this. Frozen raspberries would be even more leaky, as the freezing and thawing will soften them. To make a raspberry muffin, you have to accept that raspberry is very moist, so you cannot ...


3

I've had really good results with special "breathable" plastic bags designed to let ethylene gas escape. The ones I'm using now are made by PEAKfresh USA. These work particularly well with strawberries. Apparently some retailers are catching on and prolonging produce shelf-life through ethylene absorption.


3

Probably harmless. I'd go back to the store and tell them about it. If unsure, do not eat them and find another store.


3

Reporting experimental results. I hypothesized that frozen berries will fare better than fresh. The reasoning? It will take them a while to thaw if the cream is poured at room temperature and put in the fridge right after. By the time they thaw, the cream would have set. In practice, it's more complicated. Alchimista's hunch is accurate. The skin of the ...


3

Yes. Freezing can change the texture of the berries, but if you're cooking them down to make jam with, it shouldn't matter. Some recipes using frozen berries suggest preparing the fruit for this purpose (adding lemon or crushing strawberries), others start with pre-frozen fruit that had no special jam-related preparation.


2

Pistachios would go really well with those. and now I want to make cookies...


2

No, you should boil for at least 1 Minute. Food Safety Authority of Ireland states the following in May 2017, especially for imported berries: As a result of outbreaks of norovirus and hepatitis A virus in imported frozen berries across Europe in recent years, the FSAI recommends boiling imported frozen berries for one minute before consumption. ...


1

You may have a variant of 'fruit float' which is usually caused by pouring the jam into jars when it is too hot, and not yet viscous enough to prevent less-dense ingredients from rising. Let the jam rest, off the heat, for 5-10 minutes, and fold gently so as not to introduce too many bubbles, before pouring. You can see when the fruit/pulp/rind is reluctant ...


1

I've found when hot-packing jam into jars that have just come out of the oven at 160°C, the jam that is in contact with the glass keeps cooking and thickens. You can tell because it sizzles as it goes in, despite being over 100°C when poured (I use a jam thermometer so can be fairly sure). Letting it cool then packing for rapid consumption always ...


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