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10

Pasta can be made from many types of flour. Often, this is predicated on style of pasta or the dish. 100% AP flour will be just fine for your ravioli. I use it often when making fresh pasta. Substituting the AP flour for the semolina might impact the hydration. I would hold off on the water at first. If the dough feels too dry, add water a tablespoon ...


6

I've done option 3 for a christmas dinner party, even with the egg-yolk trick. In one night I learned both that it can be done, and also that it can be a complete disaster. I made three large pieces of ravioli per person, each with a different filling. I was most worried about the yolks breaking during transport, so I those in a separate tupperware box, ...


4

This is an old thread, but I am researching ravioli, and came across it... My mother was Russian, and I grew up eating the Russian version of ravioli, Pielmeini (peel-uh-main-ee) and the hamburger was NEVER cooked. It was hamburger, often hand ground chuck at home with a crank meat grinder. The meat was mixed with raw diced onion, with some garlic, salt and ...


3

There is no reason not to do it in the sense of the food police arresting you or your oven exploding. But still, many people prefer not to do it (and some of them may feel that this gives them the moral obligation to become said food police :) ) The scientific reasoning behind it is that when the dairy proteins, when heated in the presence of the acid ...


3

Ravioli and all fresh pasta for that matter work really well frozen. you just need to keep an eye on the cooking time as it will obviously be different. when i go to Vialeggio i always fill up of ravioli and tortellini, freeze and use over many months with great results. http://www.gardalake.com/place/valeggio-sul-mincio/


2

I take the question to mean how you can best preserve the fresh-made texture with microwaving? I would make, cool and store ravioli in single layers on parchment/waxpaper in a container for transport. Separately, the sauce transported in largest microve-safe container that will fit in office micowave. Heat sauce to boiling then gently add in ravioli and ...


2

Sure...why not? There is not a scientific reason to not include them. They may not be traditional fillings, but there is no reason they could not work. Kimchi ravioli could be interesting, for example.


1

Just push down gently with your thumbs; you want an impression that's about 1cm deep. There is no way to ensure uniformity if you have lost the insert. You can just buy a replacement ravioli maker, which will have the plastic plate. I suppose you could even fabricate a replacement for the missing plate, but anything you make is liable to be more ...


1

The recipe does say to cook them in the sauce if frozen, but I think it is more a suggestion about another method you could use to cook the ravioli. You could definitely still just boil the frozen ravioli and add them to the sauce. I would probably boil them an additional minute or two being very careful to check to see if they are done past the 4 minute ...


1

Option 3 cooked 3/4 of the way is your best bet. When you drain the ravioli, coat with your oil of choice so they don't stick together. I would choose olive oil. Then when onsite you can Blanche them to finish cooking them, and serve them fresh out of the pot. Alternatively, if you are using a steam tray, cook them fully and coat with oil, put into your ...


1

My dad immigrated to America from Italy, along with the rest of his famiglia in the 1920s. Ravioli meat mixture was never cooked beforehand. Mixture was raw, lean ground beef, egg, bread crumbs, parmesan cheese, chopped drained spinach, crushed dried fennel, dried oregano, salt, pepper, garlic fresh or powder The egg binds the mixture. The level teaspoon ...


1

Add breadcrumbs to the filling to absorb excess moisture.


1

To avoid sogginess, be sure to drain the ricotta through a cheesecloth before mixing with ingredients.


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