43

First, 145 °F (63 °C) and higher is the temperature for a well done steak. So, with the addition of carry-over cooking, your results don't surprise me. If you are shooting for rare, cook to an internal temperature of 125 °F (52 °C), and let your steak rest 10 minutes before slicing. While the USDA correctly and necessarily provides temperature guidelines, ...


32

What you're looking at is called (in the US) "cross contamination". You have a food generally considered "unsafe" (beef) that is coming into contact with a food generally considered "safe" (salad greens). This contact makes the greens "unsafe" to consume raw. Cross-contamination is the transfer of harmful bacteria to food from other foods, cutting boards,...


17

No, it's not safe to eat those greens without cooking, for exactly the same reason it's unsafe to eat the meat that's touching them without cooking it. If you have to cook the meat before eating to make it safe, you would have to cook anything it's touched to make it safe. Maybe it's not quite as risky as eating the meat, but it's still risky. They could ...


17

Your second suggestion is best. When hunting, we always brought cheesecloth game bags into which to place the quarters, etc. They worked well at keeping flies off and allowing air circulation. I prefer the cheesecloth ones as they allow better air circulation than the muslin ones; particularly important for long term hanging and drying. You can also just ...


16

Different countries can have very different names for their cuts of meat, and in some cases, there isn't an obvious/direct equivalent from a French cut to an American or English cut. If you look at a French butcher's diagram, you'll see the lines and cuts don't correspond directly to a US diagram. I believe that what you saw labeled as "plat nerveux" is ...


15

Rinsing or washing the container is no worse than rinsing or washing a plate on which you have let your meat rest. But do it when you take your meat out, not a couple of hours later, to avoid spoilage starting. If you send yours to landfill, cleaning it is for your comfort. Where and when I grew up we would never bother, but we did accept that bins smell of ...


14

You can use the same board (I often do), but you must wash it in hot, soapy water in-between. Usually there is plenty of time to do this while the meat is cooking. Because bacteria grows exponentially, I'd recommend washing the board soon, even if you aren't going to reuse it, to prevent accidental cross-contamination. If you're using one meat board, you ...


14

This should be fine if there is no other food below the chicken wings. What you don't want is for the chicken to be in a position to contaminate other foods. General food service guide lines include: From "Preventing Cross-Contamination During Storage Fact Sheet" (appears to originally be from the National Restaurant Educational Foundation, hosted here by ...


12

Water freezes at 32F, but turkey contains more than just water. Alton Brown answers this question in his original turkey episode of Good eats. The meat freezes at 26F, so they can call it "fresh" if it's kept at say, 30F (below the freezing temp for water). The USDA recognizes "frozen" for a turkey as having been brought down to 0F. ...


11

Almost any cut of meat can be pounded--very thin steaks commonly called cutlets or scallopini are made from tender cuts being pounded thin. This is most often done with chicken or pork, but you will also find, for example, medallions of beef tenderloin pounded to get them into a uniform shape and size. Obviously, this is work to do, and changes the ...


10

Fat That depends on what consistency you like, how oily/fatty you like your food, and the kind of food you are preparing. For things cooked on high heat, like hamburgers, more fat will give the meat more flavor and tenderness. For things cooked on lower heat, like spaghetti sauce or a casserole, less fat is generally preferable as the looser ground meat will ...


10

If you really want to eat that raw, freezing the meat at -4 deg F (-20°C) or lower for 30 days or more should kill most if not all the types of parasites found in deer. Different parasites die at different temperatures, for example: Anisakiasis (fish worms) can be treated at -4°F (-20°C) or below for 7 days (total time). Trichinellosis (pork worms) treated ...


10

It's just clotted blood. Quail is a far more game-y meat than chicken meaning there is much more muscle and you end up with a lot of dark meat. You get the same with truly free range chickens. This is nothing to worry about and I have never seen a quail which doesn't look like that. Source: My mum had a poultry farm.


9

I am not a doctor, and this is not medical advice--just my view of the current best practices recommended by sources I trust. It depends on the kind of bacteria or parasites commonly found on the food in question. Chickens are often infected with Campylobacter or Salmonella, and those bacteria can get into the flesh of the meat. So cooking chicken ...


9

The paper isn't for you. It's for the robots. Packaged ground meat like that is ground, portioned, and packaged automatically. The blocks of ground meat are formed by extruding them into an endless strip which is chopped into blocks and moved around on conveyor belts. To prevent the meat from adhering to the belts or falling between them, the strip is formed ...


8

Assuming it's a proper removable (some old ones weren't) inner crock pot you could (as in your other answer). BUT That pot will take a long time to warm up when you put it in and turn it on. I would suggest assembling all the ingredients in another container (which may also fit better in the fridge) and turning them out in to the (ideally preheated) crock ...


8

You do not need separate cutting boards, technically you only need one board After using a board you must mechanically scrub it for hygiene and flavour cross contamination reasons If the board is not properly washed between raw and cooked foods, it does not matter that it is a "separate" board, you will be causing a hygiene situation Wash boards by using ...


8

As long as you cook the meat thoroughly (i.e. if it reaches a safe temperature), most pathogens should be dead and it doesn't matter in which order you put the vegetables and the meat in. However, the order does matter if you don't want to have your garlic or onions burned while the meat is undercooked or raw vegetables while the meat is overcooking.


8

My family often makes sun dried beef for African dishes and it is generally dried openly outdoors in the sun, so fly infestation is a frequent problem. The way they usually protect it is by placing it in some sort of open container like a large tray or open wide box then covering the opening with some sort of fine net or mesh, the type you can easily find ...


8

One answer I didn't see above: (Edit: Well, it was there. Guess I missed it. Leaving this to cover details that were omitted) Cooking for safety is a function of temperature and TIME. For example, the USDA recommends 165° for chicken. But, that's an instantaneous temperature read. It's perfectly safe to eat chicken that was cooked to lower temperatures, held ...


7

Obviously, humans have eaten raw meat since we first showed up on the planet. But even after we learned how to grill our mammoth burgers, some people preferred the taste of uncooked flesh. This is especially true in Asian countries (not just fish, but beef, horse, and pork as well; collectively known as Hoe in Korea). A common practice has always been "...


7

As long as you are cooking both, as you suggest in your question, there is no danger. Any potential hazard will not survive the heat of cooking.


7

From your description- maybe its a hanging tender also called butchers cut. It's the muscle that supports the heart. Long (9-20 inches), cylindrical, no bones and very red like a liver or heart. May have a lot of silver skin if the butcher didn't clean it. Normally its costs mid range for beef. I can find it for $8-12 depending on the age. Tastes like a ...


6

Kangaroo meat is recognised as a health risk - as it's a bush meat, and is butchered in field. It can take up to two weeks before it is transported to a processor where the testing regime (which itself is only sampling a small number of carcasses) is only for salmonella and e.coli - not for the many many other pathogens and diseases kangaroos carry. There is ...


6

If the food had reached a temperature of 21 C for an unknown amount of time, you should definitely discard it. See: How do I know if food left at room temperature is still safe to eat? As a more general rule, there really is no way to provide a definitive answer; it depends on your specific refrigerator, the cooling power it has, how much air was able to ...


6

I did a little bit of digging on the topic and found this TapTrip blog post: A brief history of Sushi: why do japanese eat raw fish? It also references a Cultura Bunka article in Portuguese called Uma breve história do sushi. To quote: During Muromachi Period (1336-1573), japaneses [sic] used to transport the raw fish inside of baked rice to keep it ...


6

Can't tell from the picture, but in many places the "paper" is actually absorbent. It collects any juices, keeping things looking neat and tidy.


6

The USDA recommends cooking many meats many That is your problem right there. This USDA guideline is one that, if followed, makes almost all meat safe to eat. Meaning that it caters to the lowest common denominator, the cheapest meat out there. It's like recommending a complete Hazmat suit with oxygen bottle for anyone working with any chemicals. Yes, ...


5

What kind of meat is it, maybe pork? There are many kinds of pathogens in meat. One type are bacteria. They don't die from cold temperatures (not even freezing), but die from high heat. Unfortunately, heating the meat throughout so it's hot enough to kill all bacteria will turn it into a shoesole. So, meat is cooked to slightly lower temperatures which are ...


5

You should be aware that it is perfectly normal for meat to oxidize and become grey in color. In this case, it is still safe, provided it has been stored properly. I cannot be completely sure that this is the cause based on just your picture. If you have seen the oxidation-grey meat I am referring to and know this is not the same, then this is something ...


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