Hot answers tagged

45

Unless if it's labelled "sushi-grade" or "sashimi-grade", they probably don't freeze it deeply enough, so I wouldn't recommend it as-is. This is because of Salmon's high risk of parasites. However, you can turn it into sushi-grade fish if you have a freezer that reaches -20°C, and don't mind waiting. Here in British Columbia, the government has Sushi Safety ...


24

The skin is yellow probably because the chicken was fed with maize. Age and race of the chicken are a factor, too. In Germany (and propably Europe) you can explicitly buy „Maishähnchen“ that is fed purely with maize. If you compare this with the standard grain (wheat) fed chicken you can see the distinctive difference in Color


17

That is an interesting idea, but I would not recommend it. It is true that UV light is able to kill microorganisms, and it has been used to treat water for quite some time now. It has also been used to treat some types of juices, and is even used in the food industry (factories). It is an alternative to pasteurization, since it provides an alternative way ...


16

If the honey has always had a water content below ~18% and is continuously stored in a sealed container (for instance a glass jar), it is perfectly safe to eat as long as you are over 1 year old. In fact, pasteurized honey is inferior in quality. The pollen and spores will remain in there either way, even if they're dead and can only be removed by (expensive)...


16

To make cookie dough to eat raw you have a couple of choices: Leave the eggs out Use pasteurized eggs I'm not sure how Ben and Jerry's make theirs, but I suspect it is by pasteurizing at some point in the manufacturing process. Leaving the egg(s) out is the simplest method and doesn't make a big difference in the final product (when you are not going to ...


15

Assuming you don't cook in excess water then drain it away, there's not a difference in nutritional value here, you're just not comparing the same amount of rice. Raw, uncooked rice and beans are dry. When you cook them you add water. So if say you start with 100g of raw brown rice, you might end up with 330g of cooked brown rice. If you then take just 100g ...


15

If you can't find details then it's pretty likely it is not sushi safe, and I would certainly make that assumption. Sushi safe freezing would add extra costs and Ikea is all about low costs. Plus, it wouldn't be necessary if the fish is going to be cooked or cured, and that's how most want to use it. If it was sushi safe I'd expect to see it clearly marked ...


13

Adding to jmk answer. Maize feed chicken is in France called maispoularde, in Germany Kikok. In EU to call a chicken "corn chicken" you need to tick some boxes while growing it: fodder must be AT LEAST 50% corn. fodder cannot contain anything GMO-ed. chicken must be free ranged with access to daylight for X amount of time you cannot use antibiotics And ...


11

Lentils are good for a long time: Many claim that they stay safe "indefinitively". While that is clearly an exaggeration, properly stored lentils stay edible for years if you keep them well-sealed in a cool, dry and dark(-ish) place. Note that dry storage keeps mold at bay, closed jars protect from insect damage and cool temperatures slow trace amounts of ...


11

Partial answer, but here are some important facts before someone gets hurt: Germicidal UV (UV-C) lamps are NOT the same as blacklight/anti-counterfeit/tanning (UV-A/UV-B) lamps. Parasites and microbes are two distinct risks with raw fish, and need different measures. Something (the bulk of the food, or packaging around it, or material used to protect skin ...


11

Options With yeast-leavened dough, there are two approaches you can take: par-bake refrigerate With chemically-leavened dough, you can't refrigerate, but you get a third option: don't mix. (probably not applicable) I'll explain all three: Par-baking Here, you go ahead and bake the rolls tonight, but only until they're mostly done. You want the dough ...


10

Yes, that's fine. You're going to cook everything to a much higher temp than the minimum safe temperature for the meat that requires the highest temperature. That's the key, and your plans are far beyond what is minimally required for safety.


9

Ideally, you'd store all meat tightly wrapped and/or in air-tight containers. Further, you'd store the meat on the bottom shelf of the fridge, and the ready-to-eat food above it—just in case the meat leaks juices out, it won't be able to drip onto the ready-to-eat foods. That's perfectly safe, and indeed is what's required in a commercial fridge. The idea ...


9

How to deal with a freshly shot hare. Immediately it is shot, or as soon as possible thereafter, take hold of the carcase between the rear legs hold the legs downwards and apply pressure with both thumbs between the legs on the bladder to expel any urine onto the ground. This will stop stale urine tainting the meat. Do not paunch the hare. Leave the ...


8

As I explained in another question recently, there is no meaningful answer to this. There is no way to make the prediction "you have a X percent chance of infection per parasite infested meal". Instead of predicting it mathematically, we could feed people infected fish and measure it, but as far as I am aware, no ethical board will approve that experiment. ...


7

The website specifically says : All of our salame are cured and naturally aged. Other salumi items like our Mortadella are spiced and cooked in the Italian tradition. The problem is that there are two classifications of meat that only vary by a letter: Salami (the plural of salame) are cured, air-dried meats. They can be stored at room temperature (at ...


7

Because you know you have previously frozen the fish. A lot of shop bought "fresh" fish is likely to have been frozen and defrosted, before sale. Often there is legislation about freezing fish if it is to be eaten raw. Note that home freezers may not be as effective as commercial freezers and blast freezers so you may need to keep the fish frozen ...


6

As far as I know, shrimp paste is ground shrimp fermented with a lot of salt. You may have a hard time replicating this exactly with easy-to-find vegan ingredients, but I think what might work well as a substitute is a mixture of miso and dried seawead or kelp powder. The seaweed would give you the fishy taste and the miso - which is salted, fermented ...


6

I'm a beekeeper who produces and sells raw unfiltered honey, so here's the scoop. The US Food and Drug Administration had two standards for liquid honey: Filtered and Strained. If liquid honey is not strained or filtered to remove objectionable material, it can not legally be sold as "honey". Filtered honey is typically produced by heating honey to around ...


6

I did a little bit of digging on the topic and found this TapTrip blog post: A brief history of Sushi: why do japanese eat raw fish? It also references a Cultura Bunka article in Portuguese called Uma breve história do sushi. To quote: During Muromachi Period (1336-1573), japaneses [sic] used to transport the raw fish inside of baked rice to keep it ...


6

Food kept at refrigeration temperatures is relatively safe. Any potential pathogens can not jump or fly about without something to propel them. Dripping can potentially contaminate. Cooking can render many things safe (if initially stored properly). Keeping meats in closed containers is more sanitary (and respectful of others). However, to suggest that ...


6

You can cook meat products in a microwave, and be safe, but you need to make sure they're fully cooked. Microwave ovens vary a lot in both their power output and how evenly they cook, so 2 minutes may not really be enough to be certain of cooking thoroughly. Next time I suggest you cut it in half when you think it's done, and check that the middle is both ...


5

In principle, I don't see why you couldn't take the flour to safe temperatures just like any other food. You'd have to reach temperatures which break down proteins, something like 165 F or 75 C should be sufficient (it's good enough for meat). This will break down the proteins in the flour too, so I would expect it to behave like standard browned flour (...


5

Limitation with the UV wand is that is only kills bacteria on the surface. If bacteria is present on the surface of the fish then it is could also be present inside the fish. If the bacteria requires oxygen then then it would not penetrate far. According to this not all bacteria requires oxygen. It would likely reduce the risk.


5

Can I still use it for sushi/sashimi? Assuming you mean the standard raw-fish preparation method, no. When the label points out clearly not for raw consumption, believe it or not, it's not even worth the risk. Take my advice: Make some golden-brown crusted seared salmon!


4

This answer is an extension to Anpan's which is correct, this is just to mention an edge case, that being poisoning (not due to botulism which is easily handled by an adult stomach). The first of the two links in the question does mention this. Certain pollen's produce toxic honey. The mountain laurel being an example. An account of mass poisoning using ...


4

Wash everything in very hot water, with dish soap, and rinse thoroughly. Unless there are at risk people in your home, this should be sufficient. If you are very concerned, you can make a sanitizing agent by diluting bleach. The ratio would be about 1 tablespoon of bleach to one gallon of water, per this Oklahoma State University shared from UC Davis: [...


4

There is a lot of ambiguous and misused terminology in cooking... added to that, different countries have specific legal definitions for foodstuffs that vary from one jurisdiction to another. Gammon vs. Ham Some sources call it gammon if it is raw, while others claim gammon differs from ham because it is cured with the belly and then detached, whereas hams ...


4

If you're in the US, you are likely to be inspected. The inspector will use a thermometer to make sure that the chicken is being stored below 40F (4.5C). That is the FDA requirement as well. You may or may not need a refrigerator, it sounds to me that first you need a thermometer.


4

Raw leeks are quite strong and will mellow if cooked, so get it up to temperature for awhile and see where you get. I suspect that will get you much of the way there. If not, some mild acidity will help, adding a squeeze of lemon juice may do it for you.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible