16

According to the nutella nutritional fact label, 1 tbsp = 19g. There are 16 tbsp in a cup so 16 * 19g = 304g


11

1.5 litres for 4 servings is 375ml per serving (plus some volume from the veg which I'll ignore) assuming no water boils off. That's a sensible portion. I reckon my soup bowls hold just a little less than that, but you'll leave some in the pan when serving . So I doubt you lose a lot of water when you normally cook it. That said, I'd err on the side of ...


10

I'm totally retracting everything I said in comments. Doing this with just Jello (no unflavored gelatin) works just fine. The key is A LOT of Jello. After reading your question I researched the question of "How much gelatin is in a box of Jello?" The only answer I was able to find was that a 4-serving box of Jello contains as much gelatin as a .25oz packet ...


9

Things applied in a non-linear manner do not scale linearly, i.e. when the 'Surface to volume ratio' matters, the recipe will not scale linearly. See http://kitchenscience.sci-toys.com/scaling for a discussion mostly on how the timings are affected. One example is breading: You will not need to double the breading linearly on a single 200g piece of beef/...


9

I've done this and it'll work, but your yield will be small. With a gallon of quality milk, my yield is about one pound of mozz. Divide that by four and it ends up being about 4 oz. Use an appropriate size pot and microwave container... And use a thermometer. I've only used liquid rennet and I don't think there's much difference in dissolving the tabs. I'...


9

It is likely the same as a 14 oz can of tomatoes. From the Wikipedia article on Tin Cans: A standard size tin can is roughly 400g; however, the weight can vary between 385g and 425g, depending on the density of the contents. UK shops selling tins of tomatoes quote 390-400 grams based on what I'm seeing. This is equivalent to 14 oz. American cans will ...


8

Assuming it says 100% for the potatoes, I don't think you've got the scaling right. The recipe format picks a baseline ingredient, then gives the quantities for other ingredients as percentages of that ingredient. So if it says potatoes 100%, water 200%, then for 1kg of potatoes you need 2kg (2L) of water. See the detailed explanation from the source. The ...


7

I actually measured and weighed a cup of Nutella and I got 290g. Of course we have to take into consideration my 1 cup measurement (I'm pretty sure they are not exactly the same) and my scale. But it just shows that the 300g mark is not far off.


7

You do need to be quite accurate with proportions if you were to try this in smaller quantities; the rennet and acid interact to cause the milk to curdle and produce the final texture. If you throw that balance off, your results may differ in unpredictable and possibly unpleasant ways. Times will need to be adjusted as well because everything will move ...


7

Generally speaking, you are correct that less water will boil off as a % of the total when you increase water volume. Mainly because the surface area of the water will not increase enough to offset the extra volume. The amount of water evaporating will be directly related to the surface area of the top of the water. Imagine a tall test tube of water with a ...


7

This is on the list of ingredients, so it is the pre-cooked formula weight, to demonstrate to the buyer just how much chocolate chunks to expect. Post cooking, the chocolate has changed, as have the other ingredients. The ingredients also list: Raising Agents: Ammonium Bicarbonate, Sodium Bicarbonate, Disodium Diphosphate, These are NOT present in this ...


6

On my Nutella jar it says that 2 tablespoons of the deliciousness is 37 grams. So, 37x8= 296 grams of Nutella is one cup.


6

Here's my trick for measuring sticky, dense things like Nutella: Take whatever liquid you're using and measure an amount, like 1 cup. add the Nutella to the liquid and the level will rise to the measurement you need. For example, if I need 1/2 cup of Nutella and there is milk in my recipe, I'll put 1 cup of milk on my measuring cup, add enough Nutella to ...


6

I haven't made jam in years and don't know first-hand, but this website suggests it won't scale as the jam won't cook as well. This seems predicated on the idea that your cooking vessel remains the same size but the batch is larger. From the linked site: Most jam recipes already call for you to use the widest pot you have, for maximum surface area. ...


6

SAJ14SAJ's answer is very good for the basic case. There are a few exceptions. First, if you have an ingredient which is partly discarded, it can be hard or impossible to find out what part ended up in your final food. If you deep fry vegetables in oil, you will have to calculate the change in oil weight to find out how much oil got absorbed. Worse, if you ...


6

If you never prepared the recipe as written (which appears to be the case), you have no basis to tie the way it tastes when doubled to doubling it, rather than to the proportions of the original recipe. Based on many years of making many things in many sized batches, if I double a recipe and want it to taste the same as the original recipe, I double the ...


5

I estimated that 1 cup of nutella is around 294 grams: I bought a jar of 350 grams of nutella, used a marker to indicate the nutella level of the jar. Emptied it (I was gonna use it for cookies anyway adjusting the recipe to just one 1 jar). After cleaning the jar out. I put it on a scale and filled with water. In went 282 grams of water = 282 milliliter ...


5

If you haven't done it before don't do this for Xmas day, it's not worth the risk. Always practise on less important occasions You need a wider, rather than taller pot. Nearly a paella style pan. And a strong arm Ingredients wise, I don't know of any magic scaling tricks for risotto The hardest part is stirring enough, but not too much, and doing an even ...


5

In a pancake recipe, it is unlikely to be a practical concern. The reason these ideas get started is because: Small recipes have intentional rounding-off errors to make measurements simple (1/2 tsp for example, instead of .4321 teaspoons) Scaling up may magnify error In yeast raised doughs, where yeast grows exponentially over time, scaling yeast up ...


5

Within reasonable limits, baking time is proportional to the thickness of the cake. If you scale your recipe proportionately to the change in surface area from the standard pan to the one you are going to use, the baking time will be approximately the same. You can continue to use the base time as a guideline, but as always in successful cooking and ...


5

Use Wolframalpha, it is just adding them up. Your products may not exactly match Wolframs average products, but many labs use average ingredient figures too As @rumtscho mentions the change or loss in the fermenting/cooking process will affect the final results. There have been books published with tables showing the changes caused by fermentation and ...


5

This step mentions you require the extra gelatin: You could kind of "wing" the ratio but that's risky. But when it comes to Baking/Pastries/Deserts, you must get the ratios perfect; even when it comes to gelatin. Coming from experience: there are few foods worse than over gelatinized foods. I would go the safe route and find the necessary amount of ...


5

After a quick Google I found this recipe :- http://www.grassfedgirl.com/diy-make-your-own-healing-gelatin/ Ingredients: 3-4 lbs pastured animal bones (any kind will work, I even mix them between animals) (the more bones the more likely it will gel…fill’er up! ) 4-5 quarts filtered water 1 tbsp sea salt Directions: Put all the ...


5

You should never use less liquid than is recommended by the manufacturer. If you use less you run the risk of boiling your food dry or burning it since the level of heat to maintain the pressure may increase. Get used to leftovers. You can cook several portions reserve the excess for later use. This will save you time and money. I usually will cook a ...


5

If I gave you any number I'd be almost certainly wrong - peaches come in many different sizes. (And personally I'm led to believe that any recipe that gives only a number like "8 peaches" is either crap because is's imprecise or tolerates a lot of difference.) So I suggest you either find a recipe with a weight My first guess is jams that often use equal ...


5

If this is a short cook soup, and I would consider 30 minutes lid on to be short cook for sure, then not a lot of water will be cooked off in your usual proportion, so maybe reduce from 4.5L to maybe 4.25L. If this was a longer cook with more opportunity for evaporation, then what your gut is warning you about would be more likely. If you are concerned it ...


5

No. The proofing time of a dough is a function of the ratio of yeast and available water, and the temperature of the dough. Notice these are ratios. If you doubled a recipe but didn't double the yeast with it the dough would rise much more slowly. The quantity of dough will only play a role in rise time if the dough is a significantly different temperature ...


4

You don't multiply the recipe. You have to make it multiple times. Risotto isn't as hard to do as its fame suggests, but it requires a very even heating. If you pile your rice deep, you won't get it right even with constant stirring. You always want a thin layer of rice in the pan. The good news: if you do it correctly, you can leave it there without the ...


4

Wolfram Alpha has high quality nutritional data , with common ranges, not just absolute values. It will gives amount per 100 grams, or per cup etc. Load it into a Google Docs Spreadsheet (or Excel) and go crazy. Feel free to share your Google Docs Spreadsheet when finished :-) Calories are a very good indicator of excess food consumption. Eating more ...


4

Lose It!, a free weight-loss site, has this feature. To use it I think you need to start an account. To access it, you hit the Settings tab and then select Recipes in the left-hand column. Then select "New" and follow the prompts. This calculator allows you to enter the ingredients of a dish you are preparing. Most common ingredients will pop-up in the site'...


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