6

The recipe calls for simmering 30 mins, baking 30 mins, resting 10 mins. This isn't quite an accurate representation of the recipe. The recipe calls for baking cauliflower and eggplant for 20 minutes each prior to assembly. Once assembled, the rice gets simmered for 30 minutes. Then the completed dish rests for 10 minutes. The cook times will likely not ...


5

I believe that by cooking the dry strawberry powder in your cookie mixture, you are inadvertently rehydrating the strawberry substance with the small amount of liquid available within your mixture, primarily from the butter. This isn't necessarily an issue, but like you noticed it does mean that you have less liquid for the rest of the cookie to make use of, ...


4

You should probably not reduce the cooking time by a lot, if at all. These recipes assume you are keeping the meet submerged in liquid at some constant temperature for several hours. Assuming your tenderloin is not somehow less thick than a 2 pound cut would be, nothing in the recipe changes. The core temperature of the cut won't take any less time to get up ...


4

They are different terms for the same object, so yes. In the images you have chosen the first is metal and the second ceramic; these would have different properties in terms of browning the food that comes into contact with the base and sides. But products branded as 'Dutch ovens' come in metal and ceramic, and products branded as 'casserole dishes' come in ...


3

It seems to me that Ratio meets your needs: Ratio: The Simple Codes Behind the Craft of Everyday Cooking Paperback – Sep 7 2010 by Michael Ruhlman (Author) Ratios are the simple proportions of one ingredient to another. Biscuit dough is 3:1:2—or 3 parts flour, 1 part fat, and 2 parts liquid. This ratio is the beginning of many variations, and ...


2

I did an experiment with chocolate chip cookies at one point very similar to this, have you tried subbing out the butter for margarine? If you want a crispier cookie, butter is the way to go, however, margarine leads to a softer, chewier cookie in my experience. I agree with Onyz that you’ll most likely need to increase either the butter/margarine or other ...


2

It is easier to define the standard drink by volume as you won't have to switch between concentrations by volume (as is normal in most drinks) and grams. This is probably where your recollection of moles comes in as somewhere in this morass of units they get involved. 14 grams of alcohol is 17.7 ml so 30% alcohol (many spirits) to get to a 100% you need ...


1

One think I would try is changing up the egg white to egg yolk recipe by multiplying the other ingredients by 1.5x and adding an extra yolk. Egg yolks are a source of emulsified fat and they keep cookies fudgier (and chewier). For other variables you can tweak, you might look at J. Kenji Lopez Alt's guide to chocolate chip cookies. He takes each ingredient 1 ...


1

There is an "easy" way to do this if you are drinking somewhere that uses fluid ounces instead of mL. I call it the "divide by 60" method. A US "standard drink" is 12 fl oz of 5%. Multiplying 12 * 0.05 gives us 0.6 fl oz of alcohol as a "standard drink". However, since we are going to be using % alcohol over and over, I find it easiest to not do the ...


1

The question provided a link to "How to determine the alcohol content of a mixed-drink?", so I'll assume you want a simpler, easier to understand answer. Consider some common drinks: 12 US fl.oz. (355 mL) bottle of 5% beer = 355×5/100 = 17.75 mL alcohol. 1½ US fl.oz (44.4 mL) shot of 40% bourbon = 44.4×40/100 = 17.76 mL alcohol. 5 US fl.oz (148 mL) glass ...


1

There are many cookbooks that talk about basics of cooking, not just lists of recipes. "Salt Fat Acid Heat" and "Joy of Cooking" are popular two such books. If you're looking specifically for the science of cooking, "Cooking for Geeks" focuses on that aspect.


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