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1

A lot of spreadable products won't be if chilled, as the fats harden. Peanut butter is one (though how much it stiffens depends on the presence of other fats than the oil from the peanuts). Nutella stored in the fridge becomes hard enough to bend cutlery when you try to get it out. Olive oil goes cloudy and thickens but doesn't come to any harm, though it's ...


2

Besides the issues already mentioned, you should also beware of storing some dry goods in the fridge, especially if you live in a high-humidity area. Basically, every time you open the container outside of the fridge, you will exchange it for more humid air. In the fridge, the moisture will condense. If you're storing something in amounts similar to the ...


1

Many food items, particularly those containing oils, but many others too, will change characteristics when cold. The good news is that keeping honey and most other things at fridge temperature does not generally affect flavour, but it may affect texture permanently. Oils and other substances that can go rancid will generally keep better in the fridge than at ...


0

Unless your mouldy food was simply leftovers left too long, then you have a more serious issue of cross-contamination. Toast crumbs in the butter, marmite or honey will do that & so will many things far less visible. If you have either cause you will first need to fully clean the fridge, then start over with better working practices. As you've noticed, ...


1

The answer is exactly what you speculated - the spit. Well, not the spit itself, but the microbial contaminants from your oral cavity that you are introducing to the food when you eat. Your mouth (and rest of you too) contains a whole bunch of microorganisms (around 700 species in the mouth). Each time you put an eating implement in your mouth and return it ...


0

Fridges circa that era didn't have a dedicated freezer compartment, instead they had a section in the main compartment, where you could utilize those trays, in or under. This Google search should give a better idea. These trays were used for ice, for which we have a modern resemblances. With the recipe I think they mean that you don't have to empty your ...


13

I ran a quick search on ebay Images. Looks like a refrigerator tray is a shallow glass or enameled dish. I saw a few plastic ones, also from the 60s-70s.


4

Stephie's answer is thorough. I just want to add a couple more points in favour of refrigerating: Firstly, the cooked meat inside is not the only thing that can spoil. Fluffy bread itself is prone to growing mold within a few days in a moist environment (especially if exposed to people's hands and breath), or drying out and being unpleasant to eat in a dry ...


75

There are two differences between your buns and a tin can. First, your buns were heated to a core temperature of under 100°C. Yes, your oven was probably set way higher, but the water content in your filling prevents it from getting hotter than boiling water. Commercial canning is done in the vicinity of 120-130°C, which is possible because the cans are ...


24

I don't know about chicken specifically, but pork filled baozi (steamed buns) need to be stored in the refrigerator. Bread crust isn't exactly non-porous after all (squeeze a bun, the air doesn't bulge out of another part of the bun, it escapes and then flows back in when you release it). I wouldn't risk it.


3

I am aware that this is quite late. Blackening and browning of fruit is caused by the oxidation of polyphenolic compounds in the fruit by a class of enzymes known as, perhaps unsurprisingly, polyphenolic oxidases (PPOs). PPOs are found inside the cells of the fruit you are eating and are released when you rupture the cell wall and membrane when the fruit is ...


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