54

"Cooking" is often a chemical process. Denaturing proteins, gelatinization, causing chemical reactions like browning, or even causing state changes like evaporation. In many cases for these reactions to happen, we need to overheat the food. (Cook it and let it rest to cool off back down to undo some of the changes that were made and/or bring it back down ...


21

The first issue I see is that you are over cooking your chicken breast. 20 minutes in a pressure cooker is really over doing it. Even a little over cooking dries chicken breast. Chicken breast needs to be cooked more precisely. A pressure cooker is not the correct tool for the job. So you first need to correct your initial cooking. You should get a ...


16

I would suggest opening the sandwich so the filling is facing up, removing any toppings that you would prefer to remain cold, and sticking it in an oven or toaster oven for a bit. That gets the heat to the center of the sandwich immediately, though you'll want low heat (maybe 250F?) and not to heat it very long or the bread will get too toasted. It won't ...


15

Your microwave isn't exactly cooking your food from the inside out. Instead, what is happening is that some parts of your food that happen to be on the interior are being heated faster than those parts of the exterior that you observe. This sort of uneven heating is intrinsic with how microwaves work. Microwave ovens cook unevenly because a pattern of ...


15

If a dish, any dish, leftovers or otherwise, has raw chicken added to it, then is cooked until said chicken is fully cooked, it is then safe to eat. There is nothing from what you describe that justifies assuming that the way the dish is handled would be unsafe.


15

I called General Mills, the makers of Hamburger Helper, and asked if there had been any changes to their recipes in the past 3 years. The representative (Thanks Kathy!) told me that the only recent change happened in 2016 when they stopped using artificial flavors and colors and switched to an all-natural formula. (see What does "natural" actually ...


12

I would recommend separating the crackling from the meat and re-heating both separately. The meat can go into the oven (or the microwave), the crackling can go under the grill (aka broiler).


12

The key here is that you said you’ve thawed the pizza. Frozen pizzas are designed to be baked from frozen. The instructions on the box should reflect this.


11

If you're going to reheat pasta, microwaving is a good way. Adding a few drops of water and covering helps the texture if it doesn't have sauce already on it. You can actually do something close to a stir fry - heat some oil and use it to cook tasty ingredients (onions, garlic, herbs, spices) and then stir in the pasta (and things like olives or sweetcorn ...


10

The truth is, there really is no good way to reheat such sandwiches. The bread will have gotten soggy while the sandwich was in the refrigerator, and the densest part (which requires the most energy to get hot) is on the inside. The option which is probably the least poor is to use the microwave, as more of the energy will be transmitted to the filling ...


9

You do get some reflection of microwaves off a glass or plastic cover (Table 1 here) Material Reflection Transmission Metal 0.88 0.00 Glass 0.38 0.60 Plexiglas 0.16 0.83 Don't use metal lids. Neither glass nor Plexiglass plastic absorb much of the beam. The question then becomes: Does reflection ...


9

If you have a pre-cooked burger patty, I'd suggest heating it in a frying pan / skillet over a high heat, add a splash of water and then cover with a small heat-proof bowl (a cloche), or a lid on your pan. The water will steam the burger back into life, adding moisture and trapping the heat to more thoroughly warm it through. I also use this technique when ...


8

From an article entitled The Forgotten Inventor Of The Chicken Nugget on BusinessInsider.com Baker’s prototype nugget, developed with student Joseph Marshall, mastered two food-engineering challenges: keeping ground meat together without putting a skin around it, and keeping batter attached to the meat despite the shrinkage caused by freezing and the ...


8

I haven't tried that, but in theory, a standard custard should be capable of rebaking. However, it will be a tricky matter, much trickier than the first baking. For example, the temperature at which certain proteins in the egg coagulate depends on the speed at which the egg is heated. As a side effect, it is much harder to get a good custard starting with ...


8

Uncooked pasta (fresh, partly dried or fully dried) needs to be boiled in water because it needs to absorb water in order to become soft. Pasta which has already been fully cooked, ready to eat, and then cooled down (i.e. leftovers) already contains enough water. So it can be reheated in any way you like. However, microwaving pasta leftovers without a sauce ...


7

There is some very useful information for you in this thread. The direct answer is, every time you re-heat and cool the entire pot, you're passing through the "danger zone" (40-140 °F or 4-60 °C) where bacteria will continue growing. Even if you manage to kill all of them, this is a problem because: Some bacteria leave behind harmful protein toxins that ...


7

As a rule, frozen foods that are fully cooked do not have that requirement. If the label says "fully cooked", you can eat it still frozen if you want. Where have you seen "fully cooked" and "must be cooked before serving" on the same label? Here is a typical example. The directions say "until warm" for esthetic reasons only. There is no need to reach 165F, ...


7

To reheat left over rice, microwave is the best! Put a clean damp (wet but not runny) cloth or paper towel on top of your rice in a microwave safe dish and heat it for 2 minutes. Don't put a lid on top of the dish. Left over pasta is always gross, no matter how you reheat it. So stick with microwave. If you pasta is not super saucy, same method (with a damp ...


7

The official answer from your health department is no, it's not safe. After four hours at room temperature, you have to pitch it. That standard is a little on the paranoid side. Which is appropriate, since they have to protect people for whom a little salmonella is potentially life-threatening (the infirm, babies, the elderly, etc.) If you're young and ...


7

Chicken breast is not suitable for making shredded meat. For that, you need collagen-rich dark meat, for example chicken thighs. If you cook your chicken breast less, as moscafj suggested, you can certainly get tasty chicken breast. For easy portioning, you can precut it into strips and keep a supply of pan-fried strips, for example. But you will never get ...


7

You are missing an option, which is to let the meat rest before serving and bake the potatoes at the right temperature. Most meats, especially beef, become more tender if they have a chance to rest, as it lets the fibers relax. This is true of slow cooked meat as well. So, your best option is to take the beef out, keep it covered and crank up the oven for ...


6

The best way is to take the sub apart. Scrape any left over loose condiments (i.e. Mayo, ketchup, mustard, etc.) off of the bread. Turn your toaster oven on to about 250°. Put your bread in it while it's heating up. Then on a separate plate, heat up your sub guts (cheesesteak, fish, etc) for about 1.5 minutes in the microwave. Check your bread to see where ...


6

Sadly, baked potatoes are one of those foods that are only truly at their peak when first baked. Either re-baking them or microwaving them will give the least bad results for reheating. Your better bet, however, is to give them a new life, for example as potato pancakes, hash browns, as an ingredient in a hash, or similar application. While they won't ...


6

Although I agree that they're better off used in hash or some other application, if you really want them as a baked potato, you'll want to reheat them slowly to warm them fully through. You'll need to get them warm enough to re-geletanlize the starches. I generally put them in an oven near 250°F, wrapped in foil to prevent the skins from drying out ...


6

Frozen hash browns like that are already pretty much cooked. When you bake them, you're really just heating them up and crisping the outside. If you cook some then save them, they're going to lose a lot of that crispiness no matter what you do. If you eat them cold they'll be, well, cold. If you heat them in the microwave, they'll soften even more. If you ...


6

They won't be as good as when fresh (of course) but generally: You want the oven pretty hot. How hot depends on the oven, size of fry, etc., but a good first guess would be 425°F–450°F. On most toaster ovens I've seen, that'd be as hot as it goes. Let the oven preheat. Unfortunately, heating the oven is going to take longer than your five minutes, probably ...


6

Your sauce is thickening up too much because it's losing moisture. After you cook your cheese sauce to perfection and mix it in with your pasta 2 things are happening: The sauce loses moisture due to evaporation. It's hot, and even with the lid on you will still lose moisture The pasta will soak up water from the sauce. It's just starch, and starch sponges ...


6

Very doable, you just have to fool around with them a little. Watch the meat carefully, and check the internal temperature in several pieces with a meat thermometer, as they're heating. If you're concerned about a hot spot in the oven, you can rotate the pan every couple of minutes. Pull from the oven once they've reached serving temp. Remember they'll ...


6

What you're concerned with when it come to food spoilage is the toxins bacteria produce, not the bacteria. While heating it will kill the bacteria, the toxins are typically proteins which will not be destroyed until your food has been turned to charcoal. Heating it will thus not increase the shelf life. On the contrary: heating and the cooling means your ...


6

The "do not reheat" is standard text on food that's already cooked (like these noodles) with the expectation you'll cook it again. So they expect you to reheat once by stir-frying, then not again. You don't need to heat them before adding to a wok, but that's not what they're referring to. The reasoning is usually about total time at temperatures ideal for ...


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