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Cooking classes aren't the only way to learn cooking - in fact, they're a relatively expensive way to go about it, especially as it's hard to introduce all the various techniques in one lesson. There are any number of beginner's cook books out there that introduce basic concepts and techniques extremely well. There are masses of videos on YouTube covering ...


10

I think the best solution is to avoid pre-mixing or pre-saucing anything. If you bring out a big bowl of pasta tossed (or topped) with sauce, the only way to get sauce is to eat pasta. Imagine instead you bring out: a big bowl of pasta, perhaps tossed with a little oil to keep it from sticking a bowl of brown rice marinara sauce alfredo sauce olive-oil-...


8

Honestly, I'd say there is no substitute that you're likely to have on hand. The unique qualities of celery are mostly the cellulose crunch it provides, and the suggested substitutions like daikon, radish, bok choy or the like are even less likely to be in your pantry. Most likely you'll just have to go without or make a trip. If it is just the taste in ...


8

You can buy prepackaged low-carb pasta (or gluten free pasta) if you want to make a quick dish. For a healthier option, you can make zucchini noodles. All you need for this is a lot of zucchini and a mandolin or spiral slicer. "Zoodles" are so easy to make and delicious with pasta sauce and fresh cheese! I make these a lot and oftentimes add caramelized ...


7

The modern way is still to sieve. I actually did this a couple of days ago. I made a sauce out of boiled onions, capiscums, chilli peppers, canned plum tomatoes, carrots, garlic, ginger and spices. This was then whizzed in a blender and sieved through a fine metal sieve to remove the pulp, seeds, large fibrous pieces that wern't blended. It makes for a ...


6

You're in luck -- there was a paper earlir this year than analyzed the physics of making fried rice by professional Chinese chefs: https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/full/10.1098/rsif.2019.0622 My take away from that was that you have to flip things fast when you're dealing with high heat -- three times per second. Almost every list that I've seen of ...


4

http://www.ukfoodguide.net/enumeric.htm The E numbers are standardized across all EU nations. I'm not even aware if non EU nations use them?


4

When I saw this question a few months ago, I didn't want to answer it because: cooking for people with any kind of nutritional disease is not only difficult, but also dangerous, therefore, before you move on, please ensure: You have to have more than a basic understanding of (bio)chemistry You have to have more than a basic understanding of nutrition You ...


4

For the beginner wanting explicit instructions, I don't think you can do better than a 14 day free trial of the America's Test Kitchen website. They break everything down to where it's almost foolproof (which can actually be a bit of a negative to highly experienced cooks); it's great if you're stepping outside of your comfort zone. You can learn a LOT from ...


3

Through an endless clicking odyssey, I finally discovered this youtube channel. It has both explanations and flawless English subtitles, and is by far the most useful resource I've seen so far. This channel is also great, although not as helpful because there is just the cooking without any explanations.


3

Quality control of food A good chef should be able to explain what his/her methods are for controlling food quality and determining whether the price is appropriate for the quality delivered. Inventory control A good chef should have an understanding of the inventory required to serve the expected guests. He/she should be able to talk about methods how to ...


3

I agree with the above. I'm diabetic and cook normal meals for guests. I generally stay away from white sugar, flour, and rice. You can make nearly anything and avoid those three things. I'm sure your diabetic guest knows how to limit his/her carbs.


3

Spaghetti squash for the pasta.... see Replacement for pasta that is natural and fairly low carb For mashed potatoes, some people like mashed cauliflower. You can find many recipes by googling ,


3

This list is probably the extensive I've seen on the Internet with some scientific accuracy behind it. A more condensed list with great references at the bottom can also be found here. The numbers seem to jive with my own experience, especially in the high variance of some of the foods. As some of the commentators alluded to, if you are looking for ...


3

It really depends on what you are looking for in a cooking class. I can give you some thoughts from my own personal experiences, but I am sure there are many factors that you must consider, so you will get a variety of answers. I am assuming you are talking about recreational (that is the industry term, as opposed to professional) classes; I don't claim to ...


2

I personally prefer Recipes By Ingredients: Its on almost everything from windows, apple, android, amazon, and chrome It allows for searching by ingredients, allergies, servings, calories, and a lot more It also allows you to save a recipe and access it from any device


2

There's a class/club at UCLA devoted to this. Their blog is pretty good and has links to more resources: https://scienceandfooducla.wordpress.com/


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wounder if there are other veggies I can mash to come up with something like mash potatoes but less starchy No, there isn't. Mashed potatoes don't have much aroma, and if they did, no substitute would have a potato-like aroma. What makes mashed potatoes be that way is the fact that they are made up with starch. For a really good mahsed potato dish, you ...


2

Serious Eats has some videos and what not in their Knife Skills section. The basic skills are covered in this article (slice, chop, rock chop). Other things to note include how to carve meats, how to cut herbs and tomatoes. America's Test Kitchen is pretty good as well, since they go slow and show things visually though they often don't narrate their ...


1

If you truly want complex, I’d suggest the Alinea cookbook by Grant Achatz. This book highlights molecular gastronomy techniques and recipes featured at his award winning restaurant in Chicago. Another route to go would be to look for traditional recipes from different cooking heritages. The James Beard Foundation will annually award the best cookbooks ...


1

This isn’t really an answer about the cucumber you mention, but actually the idea to pickle anything from crabapples to watermelon rinds... My great grandmother (raised in the Great Depression) made pickled watermelon rinds. I’ll never forget their unexpected crunch and sweetness. Here is a description, but basically sugar and salt them, add vinegar and ...


1

internet recipes are often lacking, because generally all you get is the recipe itself. i've found that the best recipes come from cookbooks, which often have explanations and tips for many of their recipes. of course, buying cookbooks requires an investment that beginning cooks might not be willing to make. but if you identify a well-respected cookbook ...


1

How about a good website? http://www.kingarthurflour.com/ Be aware that the brand of flour that website stresses measures and behaves slightly differently than other brands of flour, but they are usually interchangeable. In other words, a recipe on that site will always say such and such amount of a particular type (bread flour, all-purpose flour, whole ...


1

I've only limited experience with classes, so I hope you get a better answer, but here's what I know. If you are looking to learn, you should only think about hands-on courses, not the kind in a studio kitchen where you just sit and watch (and usually get to taste). Although the latter is a pleasant way to spend an evening, if you're anything like me, you ...


1

Here is one recipe: http://www.food.com/recipe/rolled-fondant-247561 I cannot speak to its quality. I would stay away from any recipe calling for marshmallow fluff, however--at least as fondant. You can also purchase fondant, should you so choose, from some internet retailers or retail stores.


1

http://juicerecipes.com/ Is a great website. They have search by ingredient.


1

Check THIS one out! It went viral for good reason - I've tried it, it works just like in the video! She slightly squeezes a plastic water bottle and presses the opening against the top of the yolk, then releases the pressure on the bottle. The resulting vacuum sucks the clean yolk (no white at all) into the bottle. Another squeeze and the yolk is deposited ...


1

Yes, this is an old question, but the book's new -- America's Test Kitchen's "How Can It Be Gluten Free". In the book, they discuss the advantages/disadvantages of different pre-made gluten-free 'flour' mixes (as some worked well as flour replacements for some types of recipes, but not all ... so one good for bread might not be so great for brownies or ...


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