30

Why bother paying for instruction or books. The best way to learn is watching a video and practicing. Youtube Youtube has a great wealth of videos on knife skills. I'm more a visual learner. I like to see a video. A book are not going to help me squat. Knife Skills: Julliene with Ann Burrell Knife Skills: Chiffonade with Ann Burrell Knife SKills: Slicing ...


13

How about Ruhlman's book, Ratio: The Simple Codes Behind the Craft of Everyday Cooking? The entire work is dedicated to breaking cooking down into ratios, and it includes recipes. I hear the bread recipe is particularly good.


12

Cooking classes aren't the only way to learn cooking - in fact, they're a relatively expensive way to go about it, especially as it's hard to introduce all the various techniques in one lesson. There are any number of beginner's cook books out there that introduce basic concepts and techniques extremely well. There are masses of videos on YouTube covering ...


8

I think the best solution is to avoid pre-mixing or pre-saucing anything. If you bring out a big bowl of pasta tossed (or topped) with sauce, the only way to get sauce is to eat pasta. Imagine instead you bring out: a big bowl of pasta, perhaps tossed with a little oil to keep it from sticking a bowl of brown rice marinara sauce alfredo sauce olive-oil-...


8

Honestly, I'd say there is no substitute that you're likely to have on hand. The unique qualities of celery are mostly the cellulose crunch it provides, and the suggested substitutions like daikon, radish, bok choy or the like are even less likely to be in your pantry. Most likely you'll just have to go without or make a trip. If it is just the taste in ...


7

The modern way is still to sieve. I actually did this a couple of days ago. I made a sauce out of boiled onions, capiscums, chilli peppers, canned plum tomatoes, carrots, garlic, ginger and spices. This was then whizzed in a blender and sieved through a fine metal sieve to remove the pulp, seeds, large fibrous pieces that wern't blended. It makes for a ...


7

You are confusing terms here. Baker's percentages are used for bread and bread only. In pastry baking, ratio is even more important as in bread, but traditionally, nobody calles it "baker's percentages". The book you want is Ruhlman's Ratio. It gives exactly the information you want for pastry and some other things (noodles, mayonnaise). About the only ...


7

You can buy prepackaged low-carb pasta (or gluten free pasta) if you want to make a quick dish. For a healthier option, you can make zucchini noodles. All you need for this is a lot of zucchini and a mandolin or spiral slicer. "Zoodles" are so easy to make and delicious with pasta sauce and fresh cheese! I make these a lot and oftentimes add caramelized ...


5

The absolute best way to pick this up is to do it with the help of an in-person instructor. It is a motor skill that is best learned by trial, error, and the emulation of experts. Your local culinary institutes might offer courses or one-day workshops on various topics for the general public and cooking enthusiasts. For instance, here's a place in ...


4

Being a treeless island with a harsh climate, there are few natural ingredients that are specific to Iceland that are not available on mainland Europe. Some exceptions include puffin and whale meat, however, it is likely illegal to import those into your home country. Iceland does have some amazing quality lamb and dairy goods (e.g., skyr), however, it ...


4

http://www.ukfoodguide.net/enumeric.htm The E numbers are standardized across all EU nations. I'm not even aware if non EU nations use them?


4

For the beginner wanting explicit instructions, I don't think you can do better than a 14 day free trial of the America's Test Kitchen website. They break everything down to where it's almost foolproof (which can actually be a bit of a negative to highly experienced cooks); it's great if you're stepping outside of your comfort zone. You can learn a LOT from ...


4

When I saw this question a few months ago, I didn't want to answer it because: cooking for people with any kind of nutritional disease is not only difficult, but also dangerous, therefore, before you move on, please ensure: You have to have more than a basic understanding of (bio)chemistry You have to have more than a basic understanding of nutrition You ...


3

This list is probably the extensive I've seen on the Internet with some scientific accuracy behind it. A more condensed list with great references at the bottom can also be found here. The numbers seem to jive with my own experience, especially in the high variance of some of the foods. As some of the commentators alluded to, if you are looking for ...


3

It really depends on what you are looking for in a cooking class. I can give you some thoughts from my own personal experiences, but I am sure there are many factors that you must consider, so you will get a variety of answers. I am assuming you are talking about recreational (that is the industry term, as opposed to professional) classes; I don't claim to ...


3

I agree with the above. I'm diabetic and cook normal meals for guests. I generally stay away from white sugar, flour, and rice. You can make nearly anything and avoid those three things. I'm sure your diabetic guest knows how to limit his/her carbs.


3

Spaghetti squash for the pasta.... see Replacement for pasta that is natural and fairly low carb For mashed potatoes, some people like mashed cauliflower. You can find many recipes by googling ,


3

Quality control of food A good chef should be able to explain what his/her methods are for controlling food quality and determining whether the price is appropriate for the quality delivered. Inventory control A good chef should have an understanding of the inventory required to serve the expected guests. He/she should be able to talk about methods how to ...


2

Serious Eats has some videos and what not in their Knife Skills section. The basic skills are covered in this article (slice, chop, rock chop). Other things to note include how to carve meats, how to cut herbs and tomatoes. America's Test Kitchen is pretty good as well, since they go slow and show things visually though they often don't narrate their ...


2

I personally prefer Recipes By Ingredients: Its on almost everything from windows, apple, android, amazon, and chrome It allows for searching by ingredients, allergies, servings, calories, and a lot more It also allows you to save a recipe and access it from any device


2

There's a class/club at UCLA devoted to this. Their blog is pretty good and has links to more resources: https://scienceandfooducla.wordpress.com/


2

The main advantage of Dutch ovens are their versatility. There is nothing special about a dutch oven that you can't get from a combination of other pots and pans. Aside from using them as for boiling, frying, and braising, their thick walls provide a great way to bake. You will find the best Dutch oven recipes in camping cook books because camping is where ...


2

I love the Almost No-Knead Bread recipe from Cook's Illustrated as an example of baking in a Dutch Oven. I like to use my Dutch oven for pot roasts, for New England Boiled Dinner, and for all sorts of soups and stews, and for making chili. Anthony Bourdain's Les Halles Cookbook has a Dutch Oven recipe for Gigot a Sept Heures (Seven hour Leg of Lamb) that ...


2

I accidentally found a slick way to separate the egg yolk from the white: before cracking, shake the egg like crazy. I expected the egg to to be scrambled after doing this, but when I cracked it open into the frying pan, the yolk was intact! The yolk just slipped away from the egg white, frying completely separately. Related trivia: you can use this ...


2

This article from Gizmodo links to a company that makes refractometers specifically to measure particulate levels and pH balance of coffee. Good read, and lots of scientific looking charts related to coffee flavor. Chasing the Perfect Cup of Coffee With Science


2

Could this help: http://www.goodfood-project.org/www/Links/Hashimoto.pdf? I had a quick flick and it basically uses infrared analysis to work out the quality and underlying flavor of the beans. Other sites I found (though less of what you asked) are http://www.web-books.com/Classics/ON/B0/B701/22MB701.html which is just a general look at the science behind ...


2

wounder if there are other veggies I can mash to come up with something like mash potatoes but less starchy No, there isn't. Mashed potatoes don't have much aroma, and if they did, no substitute would have a potato-like aroma. What makes mashed potatoes be that way is the fact that they are made up with starch. For a really good mahsed potato dish, you ...


1

I've only limited experience with classes, so I hope you get a better answer, but here's what I know. If you are looking to learn, you should only think about hands-on courses, not the kind in a studio kitchen where you just sit and watch (and usually get to taste). Although the latter is a pleasant way to spend an evening, if you're anything like me, you ...


1

Here is one recipe: http://www.food.com/recipe/rolled-fondant-247561 I cannot speak to its quality. I would stay away from any recipe calling for marshmallow fluff, however--at least as fondant. You can also purchase fondant, should you so choose, from some internet retailers or retail stores.


1

I found a somewhat detailed overview on the Colorado State University site. Their server is down, so here is the Google Cache: Gluten-Free Baking by F. Watson, M. Stone and M. Bunning It's a very good starting point that has a good amount of detail on the following: Each flour substitute / additive, with flavor descriptions and uses Tips on how to adjust ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible