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Giving a minimum time is not possible, because it depends on the size of the loaf, whether it is in a pan or not, and the ambient temperature of the location where it is cooling. In general, the recommendation is to cool the loaf to room temperature. If you are baking rolls, this might mean 30 minutes. For a larger loaf, it could be hours. At the risk of ...


5

Yes, theoretically, and no for practical purposes. Here's the Yes part: If you have access to a chemistry lab, you can certainly analyze the dish for the presence of specific molecules that would indicate the presence of specific spices. For example, the presence of "cinnamaldehyde" would indicate that cinnamon was used. Here's the No part: First, ...


5

Disclaimer: Not a professional Look at what organizations that train professionals use. For example, the Culinary Institute of America publishes The Professional Chef. My understanding is this an instructional text for the institute. From the introduction of the 8th edition: The Professional Chef is suited to a variety of teaching situations... Chapter ...


4

Most book about molecular cooking tend to be on the expert or restaurant level. For example, the El Bulli books are full with exotic ingredients, techniques and equipments that are not usually found in home kitchen, at least when they came out. Remember that the big differences between a home cook and a restaurant cook/chef are not the recipes themselves ...


4

I am also looking to replace the Roasted Garlic salt from Lawry's. The flavor was perfect and just a little dash or two enhanced the flavor of so many things. As an experiment, I tried blending one part 'Lawry's Seasoned Salt' to one part 'McCormicks Roasted Garlic' (something I bought looking for an alternative) in a small shaker. I compared the two (yes, ...


3

Raw is punchy! Reserve some of your crushed garlic and onion mix. Mince it fine. Then add it at the end. Cooking brings out some allium flavors and attenuates others. If your figure out the raw punch is what you are looking for, experiment with the ratio of cooked to raw, or experiment with just raw onions or just raw garlic. Or you could consider ...


3

A. To make the flavor of tomatoes stronger in a sauce: start with better-tasting tomatoes. Depending on time of year these will often be canned. There are many reviews of canned tomatoes, so I'll not pass judgment here but there are some excellent ones out there. reduce the sauce more to intensify the flavor. Tomatoes are an umami flavor. Adding another ...


2

None of the flavors were overpowering (it didn't taste mostly like onions or jalapenos or garlic) That statement provides the key you can work with: prepare a bowl of each ingredient. make a reasonable guess as to the proportions and mix a sample from a small amount of each. taste the sample: if one ingredient is very overpowering, discard the sample and ...


2

First, ask if they cook any of the ingredients. It's likely that they are all raw. Next, I would probably start with a mix with an approximate base that has the same color as the original sauce ( e.g. 1:1:1 with one clove of garlic). Save some of it on the side to use again, then add some of each ingredient to your base. 2:1:1:1 / 1:2:1:1 / 1:1:2:1 etc....


2

there's another approach altogether that has worked for me: lacto-fermented tomato sauce. only takes a week, triples the amount of dishwashing, and could easily go completely wrong, especially on the first try! same amount of raw tomatoes you're already starting with, quartered, and keep the juice! halve the amount of onions you'd normally use, because ...


1

more options: add more tomatoes via pre-concentrated products like tomato paste or powder when initially cooking, add some rinsed tomato stems and leaves, this should help with the "punchy" part, just be sure to remove them soon after cooking after cooking, add up to 1 tsp lemon juice per medium/large tomato. if balanced well, the lemon flavor will lift ...


1

First, I would say, don't cut the bread while hot; steam will escape too fast and dry out the bread. Restaurants warm the bread just before serving it to customers. Restaurants usually get (or make) their bread in the morning; so it is not warm when the restaurant opens.


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