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12

Peel the rhubarb before cooking - you can strip off the outer skin from the stalks quite easily. That helps. EDIT: My wife told me to explain why. In Yorkshire, the rhubarb capital of the world, you can buy "forced rhubarb", which has a tender pink skin because it is forced to grow up through dark tubes towards the light. Because "garden Rhubarb" is not ...


4

Consider two options: Add a stabilizing agent for the compote: cornstarch immediately comes to mind, but I suppose sewit, or custard would do the trick. This automatically lends itself to needing a longer bake time which I can understand to be less favorable. Try reducing more moisture while prepping the compote. By giving the rhubarb a longer cooking time,...


3

Given your options, I would go creme fraiche, you may need to thin with a small amount of milk or water to get to yogurt consistency. Three tablespoons...you probably won't notice a difference.


3

The whole quote is Cooking the leaves with soda can make them more poisonous by producing soluble oxalates I can't tell you if the claim as a whole is true. But if it is true for the leaves, it is true for the stems too. Rhubarb contains oxalic acid and its salts which are created by the acid reacting with different metal ions such as calcium and ...


3

There are many cultivars of rhubarb, just like there are for most other vegetables. Surprisingly, it seems some cultivars with the best flavor have less of the prized pink color. The color of any particular rhubarb stalk will depend on both the cultivar, and how it was grown. You should treat it the same way, regardless of the color. So yes, green ...


2

The classic flavour pairing with rhubarb is vanilla: rhubarb and vanilla custard is a British staple. Fresh custard (Creme Anglaise, as the French call it) is easy to make and delicious. Almond also pairs well with rhubarb. You could incorporate ground almonds into the cobbler mix, or perhaps fold some amaretto liqueur into lightly whipped cream to serve ...


1

I've been asking my friends a similar question all week. The most interesting answer was by a friend whose mom used to parboil it and add it to stir fry with shrimp. Perhaps add a bit of ginger and honey.


1

If I were to make a guess, thick cooked rhubarb would be chunks of rhubarb cooked in a sugar syrup that is thickened. (Kind of like cherry pie filling, which comes in cans.) Here's what I would do to simulate this: cut some chunks of rhubarb in a size that you think you would like in a pie or cobbler. Add some water (at least a cup) and the rhubarb to a ...


1

To thicken the compote there are many ingredients you could turn to. Toss the rhubarb stocks with a couple of tbsps of flour before baking. The flour would absorb the juice that is released and thicken the compote. Cornstarch can do the same job as flour. But my personal favorite is quick cooking tapioca. I find this to be the most effective in 'drinking' up ...


1

klypos provided a great explanation and solution, but if you still have the problem and still think the butter (dairy) in the recipe might be exacerbating it, maybe try coconut milk instead of cow's milk? I haven't tried it with rhubarb specifically, but have used it in a few cooked dishes lately and it seems to work great. And that's from the perspective ...


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