Hot answers tagged

15

Yes, there's a risk, but it's not significantly higher than having most other home appliances turned on (eg, a lamp, dehumidifier, dish washer or dryer). Although it heats up, a full-sized oven is insulated, and you're not operating at a very high temperature. Provided it seals well, even if there's a fire, there would be little oxygen to sustain it. I ...


10

Sous vide is simply a tool. It's not the correct one for every job. Rendering fat is generally a problem because of the low temperatures used. What was the final result you had in mind? If you want "traditional" ribs, then the best way to cook them is traditionally. Google will reveal multiple sources, try Chefsteps and Serious Eats for starters.


9

There are three issues here: The quality of the food The safety of the food The safety of your home Food Quality From a palatability perspective, you may or may not get a decent result, depending on how high the internal temperature of the ribs rises. 180 F is very close to the temperature that needs to be achieved to effectively convert gelatin into ...


8

I just happened across this older question and found the answers provided, including the information in the link to wikipedia to be incorrect. All Prime Ribs are Standing Rib Roasts, not all Standing Rib Roasts are Prime Rib. [see edit below] A "Prime Rib" is a standing rib roast, from a beef that has achieved a USDA Grade of "Prime". Bone-In or Bone-out ...


8

It's the smoker. I had one of these, and it is extremely flawed in design. The pan that holds the charcoal does not allow for proper air flow to the fuel. Contrast this with a Weber grill, where you put your fuel on an elevated grate with plenty of air beneath it. This Char Broil instead just has a pan that you put on a shelf. Before long your coals are ...


8

I always save all my scraps to make stock. I'm not sure what you would do with lamb stock, but it would probably make a good sauce to use on lamb. The fat that renders out is also useful for future cooking of whatever it came from (duck fat for duck confit, for example). I just throw all the scraps into a slow cooker with celery, carrot, and onion (...


7

To achieve "done" pork ribs should reach an internal temp of 160°F (71ºC). The longer it takes to get there be more tender they will be. I would not recommend going any lower than 200°F (93ºC) for your cooking temp, even if that means turning the heat up a little at the end to reach your internal temp of 160°F. Put a good rub on, wrap the racks of ribs (...


7

Ribs should not be cooked with direct heat, generally. The directions on the meat are VERY defective. You should turn the left burner on, and put the ribs in the right side of the grill. You should cook at a temperature between 250-300F, typically for 4-5 hours. They're done when the meat pulls back from the bone and when you can easily tear the meat between ...


6

Even given a standardized recipe and method, cooking times are always only a guideline. Quality recipes always give you a test for knowing when the product is done. The reason for this is that there are many uncontrolled (at least from the recipe author's point of view) such as, in the case of ribs: Exact dimensions of the ribs Natural variation in the ...


6

The goal with ribs is "low and slow" cooking to break down connective tissue. But a quick sear will help to lock in juices and provide a good smoky flavor. I find it's preferable to do this first so that the smokiness can work its way into the meat over the slow cook to come. After seasoning, I would start with a sear on your grill over direct heat (8-10 ...


6

Different cuts of ribs have different degrees of curve to them. In my experience, baby back ribs are the most curved, and St. Louis cut spareribs are the flatest (although that is a relative term). This page has a chart showing where the different cuts of ribs come from in the rib cage in case you're interested. I wouldn't try to flatten the ribs; I can't ...


6

There is conflicting information on the Internet about BBQ short ribs, so, I can see the confusion. Serious Eats suggests that you want to grill short ribs to an internal temperature of about 130 F (54.5C) (medium-rare). They suggest that any hotter, and the fat will start leaking out, drying the final product. Short ribs, grilled in this manner, are ...


5

I'd personally go with a standard carving set: Very sharp non serrated long carving knife and a carving fork to help hold the meat steady without getting in-there with your hands. Assuming you're right handed I'd start on the right with the with the ribs running up away from you, maybe slightly pointing to the left. Then cut along the bone, close to the ...


5

The collagen in the ribs needs to get to a temperature of about 160 F to start breaking down into water and gelatin. If your oven can be set as low as 175 or 180 F on a normal bake or convection bake setting that is probably a better alternative unless you have access to an oven thermometer and can measure what temperature the warm setting on your oven ...


5

Slow cookers are generally recognized to be safe when used unattended - and there are a variety of slow-cooker rib recipes out there. I've made them to great success before - they're fine braising in their own juices , or with a little liquid, such as root beer or Dr. Pepper. The problem with the oven is the lack of temperature control at low temperatures ...


5

Why are you taking it off. This is the most delicious part of the rack of lamb. It is a complete ruination of a beautiful cut. Whoever invented frenching of lamb racks and cutlets should go back to the basics of what gives lamb its flavour. I am hare pressed to find a traditional old fashioned cut style of a lamb cutlet. It is usually a stick of bone ...


5

A lot of the flavor comes from the marrow of the bone. Rib bones will need companion soup bones to help them. Alone, the flavor will seem weak or watered down. Now, if you are willing to put in the time.... Bake them first at 325f for an hour, let them cool and hit them with a hammer to crack them. you might want to cover them with a towel as not to send ...


5

Yes, you absolutely can make stock from the bones. In fact, I used to be a bit mystified at people using "meaty" bones, since I first read about making stock from the bones. The method for making this kind of stock calls for "bare rendering" bones - with almost all the meat removed. The marrow and any connective tissue supply most of the flavor. To ...


5

Seems like you get the importance of the fat rendering but still want the spice rub on the meat. I would trim the skin and fat off in one piece, if possible, using a very sharp filet knife. (A small amount of fat left on the meat is okay.) Then rub your spice mix over all sides of the meat. Place the fat cap back on the meat where you removed it. On the top ...


4

There is no problem with the brine, smoke, sous vide process as long as he pays attention to typical/safe temperatures. I would sous vide then smoke and probably return to a hot grill, rather than sear, but that is personal preference. What would be unusual would be a return to the brine after the smoking. While it could be made safe from a food-safety ...


4

The key factor is going to be the breed of cattle. Angus, a very high quality beef, also has heavy bone structure and a less favorable bone-to-meat ratio, where as limousine has a lighter bone structure with more meat-to-bone. Other breeds will vary as well, with hereford being (IMHO) the 'happy medium'. But, of course, each individual steer is going fall ...


4

Vacuum-packing elongates food storage times because by removing the air you remove the oxygen, which aerobic organisms (in this case bacteria) thrive on. No oxygen means no bacterial growth. This is also known as Reduced Oxygen Packaging and can extend freezer life by years. Some things to keep in mind: If you open the package, it's life will drop ...


4

When you bake meat, certain proteins in it change and contract, squeezing out liquid. That liquid will mix with any miscible liquid around it, of course. The result will be colored like your BBQ sauce, but will be diluted. If you'd like to have a thick glaze of BBQ sauce on the finished meat, the solution is to apply it late in the cooking process, once ...


4

Your ribs didn't get hot enough to break down the connective tissue, and the connective tissue is tough. You need to cook the ribs to an internal temperature of 180°-205°F. Don't worry about rendering out the fat; the collagen from the connective tissue provides a moist texture. I've smoked beef ribs using this recipe: https://amazingribs.com/tested-...


3

There are two things that will help here: "Low and Slow"; drop your heat to 250°F for about 5-6 hours and Add a braising liquid, this will generate steam inside your aluminum foil pack. Both of these will help to break down the meat to the desired 'falling of the bone' condition. You can see a demonstration of this by Alton Brown at Foodnetwork.com Alton ...


3

To get something as close as possible to fresh meat, you should freeze the meat as quickly as possible: Package the steaks into portions with a high surface area. Chill them well before you freeze. Make sure your freezer is set as low as it will go Freeze them in a single layer. You can use some other tricks, such as having a thermal sink ... place some ...


3

While you could do this. A better method(Provided you have an enclosed grill) would be to set your grill up for indirect heat and slow cook them on your grill. This is how I do ribs and it works amazingly. You'll have to do things slightly differently if you have a square or round grill. For a round grill try the following: Place unlit briquettes around ...


3

When you approach the low end of the low-and-slow cooking methods, a concern that is normally not an issue in faster cooking methods starts becoming important: how long will it take the food to get to safe temperature? You want the food to be above 140 F (60 C) for the entirety of the cooking process, for safety, although having that happen instantly is ...


3

I use this guy's technique for grilling ribs, which calls for 5-6 hours at 225°F (105°C) on a grill or smoker (3-4 hours for baby backs). I've done them many times this way and they're absolutely delicious. I don't see any problem at all upping that to 7 hours and lowering the temp to 200°F (95°C). I wouldn't wrap them in foil or add liquid, but I probably ...


3

This will have almost no impact (if any) provided you wrap them well using a cellophane wrap. This is also a good opportunity to apply a rub to the meat.


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