50

I come from a culture where rice is our staple and I have a rice cooker. Here are some of the advantages from my perspective: Rice is perfect everytime – not stuck to the bottom, not watery, not mushy and stuck together, etc. If you make rice in a pot, and the heat is too high, it will boil and spill over creating a mess. You can switch the rice cooker on ...


32

Assuming you bought a rice cooker designed by a Japanese company (and apparently even other brands tend to meet that market's expectations), the measurement is 1-gou, slightly more than 180ml, which, by no coincidence, is also the typical measure of a wooden sake, cup, and is closely associated with a historical sake bottle size (approximately 1.8l) http://...


21

First, use basmati rice. Then, rinse your rice very well. Place rice in bowl, fill with cold water, drain, repeat until the water runs clear. I find that using the correct variety of rice, combined with good rinsing, helps keep the long grains separate.


16

There are many different ways of cooking rice, and you might not want to use a rice cooker if you really want individual grains, as it was developed for cuisines / rice varieties that are stickier. Although moscafj mentioned basmati, which is a very long grain variety of rice that's from India, and tends to cook up less sticky ... you might also consider &...


12

The plastic cup that came with my rice maker was 180 ml (3/4 cup). It's an odd size, but that's the standard.


12

Leftover rice is one of the most common causes of food poisoning. Once cooked it needs to be immediately cooled down if you aren't going to eat it straight away, and it needs to be kept cold until reheated. Reheating should be a quick process that doesn't allow it to sit for a long time at a lukewarm temperature.


11

We have recently bought one. I would not buy one again, even if they are cheap. They take up room, especially in a small kitchen. They cannot do anything a normal pot of water and some heat can't. Rice is easy to cook, it might be easier to cook in a rice-cooker, but not that much that you really need an entire machine dedicated to it.


11

If your rice cooker has that kind of timer, yes, you can do that. Just before you go to bed, add cold water (the same amount you would use if you were cooking it right away), rice and optional salt and butter. Stir well and set the timer for about 1/2 of an hour before you get up. If you're using an external timer, be sure that it actually starts the rice ...


10

There are some advantages to a pressure cooker, but I don't think that the rice QUITE finishes in 10 minutes in my experience. For proper texture, it still seems to take some time for the rice to fully hydrate and steam itself after the heat is off. A normal well-covered pot of (most kinds of) rice takes approximately 25-30 min after it comes to a boil, and ...


10

Is it worth it for things besides rice? Really depends on what you cook. It definitely can be worth it for the steaming. If you're inclined to cook rice with a bit of steamed something frequently, it's much easier than cooking rice in a pot and separately steaming things. As for rice, I don't think it's just convenience for rice. While you can certainly ...


9

Inside the rice cooker, there's a thermostat monitoring the bowl's temperature (and kept in firm contact with the bowl via the spring). As long as the temperature doesn't go above the boiling point of water, the rice cooker keeps cooking. Once it goes slightly above that point, the water must have all boiled off or been absorbed, and that means the rice is ...


8

The USDA recommended serving of rice (PDF) is 1/2 cup cooked, which should be 1/4 cup raw, as rice about doubles in size. The reality, though, is that the amount someone should eat and the amount someone does eat is not usually the same. This can be seen in the wide variation of serving sizes listed on various sites. This one that talks about serving sizes ...


8

The standard rice cup measure is one go (long o sound) ~180ml, which was at some point based on a Japanese government opinion about how much raw rice an average person would consume. 1 koku is 1000 x 1 go, so this implies that a typical person would have consumed almost one go per meal. But this would likely have been defined during a period in which most ...


8

Hot water and detergent might be enough, but after serious mold growth, I'd use a disinfectant. The easiest way to do this would be to disinfect your cooker with bleach, which is very effective at killing mold on non-porous surfaces. After thoroughly washing and rinsing your cooker, make a solution of 10 parts water to 1 part bleach and allow it to soak in ...


8

Have you considered your water source? Where we live it is a normal for our city-supplied water to smell like swamp water (nasty) or like sulphur (strong egg smell). We never drink or cook with this water. We found out early on after moving to this area (10+ years ago) that the water affected the taste of everything we cooked, including brewed coffee and tea....


8

This lady is pleased with the results just using her one-setting cooker: Sticky Rice. Note, she says in the comments that she uses 2 cups (or slightly less) water to 1 cup of rice (which makes sense) not 3 cups rice to 2 cups water like it sounds like she is saying in the video. She rinses the rice well, but does not soak it. EDIT: With things like this ...


8

I can only answer from a perspective of the Indonesian kitchen, and my own personal experience, but in general the answer is: In the water, with the rice I quite often use saffron, turmeric, cloves, daun salam (The English Wiki entry links to bay leaf, which, completely, utterly, is not the same thing), and lemongrass, and they all go in while cooking the ...


8

Still dont think that should cause it to go bad so soon as Ive always That's the problem with your line of thought, right there. Your rice has always been unsafe. For safe rice, you have to cool it down to under 4 Celsius within 4 hours of being cooked. Unsafe food will sometimes spoil, sometimes won't. It will sometimes make you ill, most of the time ...


7

There is a couple of possible reasons I can think of. Over stirring the mixture could be breaking the rice down releasing more of the starches which will be making the sauce thicker and sticking the rice into clumps. Over cooked rice again making the rice overly sticky. Like you've mentioned, lack of liquid. If the sauce is getting far too thick the ...


7

Rice can be a very dangerous food. It's always been recommended to me very strongly by my in-laws (Japanese, the family all together eats close to 1kg of rice a day) that rice, if not going to be eaten immediately, must either be left in the rice cooker on the 'keep warm' setting, or stored immediately in either the fridge (if you plan to eat it the next ...


6

I have an Aroma brand cooker (Got Rice GRC-003) and also lost the measuring cup. Their site tells you if you ever lose the cup, use a standard 3/4 cup and observe the water marks in the pot. http://www.aroma-housewares.com/kitchen/appliances/rice101/21/Rice%20Measuring%20Cup.html Hope this helps.


6

There is no risk to the Teflon itself, or from it; PTFE breaks down at about 500 F, which rice cookers will not achieve, especially on warming setting. Other than that, PTFE is one of the most inert substances known to man, as the atoms are already bound in energetically very favorable bonds: little is as able to displace them without significant input ...


6

I just purchased a Zojirushi rice cooker a couple of months ago and can’t imagine cooking rice without it now. Fuzzy logic in comparison to binary logic is a varying degree of a state. In binary logic an item is either true or false (on or off) but in fuzzy logic it can be in between, partially on or partially off. Instead of hard “done” state the fuzzy ...


6

When I visited Malaysia and Singapore, the nasi lemak I tried had very little taste of coconut - many of the people I traveled with even got surprised when they heard the rice was cooked in coconut. The name literally means 'fatty rice', which indicates that the coconut milk is added only to make the rice fatty, i.e. more sticky. When I made it myself, the ...


6

Does your rice cooker have a scale up the inside of the bowl? With mine, you add a number of scoops of rice, then fill with water up to the correct number on the side of the bowl. Maybe it is just that the manual is badly worded, and this isn't clear? It's a long shot, I know, but just thought I'd mention it in case you hadn't noticed :)


6

There are several different categories of these devices, but they do all tend to look quite similar. Prices can vary by a very significant amount, though. So. Rice Cooker The simplest kind of rice cooker is the kind with just a switch on the front to turn it on. Mine is like this - when plugged in, it's in "warm" mode, press the switch and it goes to "cook"...


6

The reason why the two types of rice that you mentioned are different in texture is because Indian takeout restaurants generally use white Basmati rice, Chinese takeout restaurants generally use white Jasmine rice. They are different rice varieties that were selectively bred over generations from wild Asian rice. Basmati rice has a lower glycemic index than ...


5

Perfect black rice in a rice cooker - I just cooked 2 cups of black rice, after a single quick rinse using a wire strainer in my Zojirushi rice cooker (fuzzy logic). I used a standard American measuring cup. I added 3 and 3/4 cups of water (vs. the standard straight 2 waters for every one unit of rice - I do this for ALL rice types as I like a fully intact ...


5

The rice you are referring to is sprouted brown rice. From wholegrainscouncil.org , GABA stands for an amino acid, gamma amino butyric acid. THE MOST TOUTED HEALTH BENEFIT of sprouted rice is GABA (gamma amino butyric acid). The GABA setting on your rice cooker will take much longer as per this article on Techilicious . If you want to push your culinary ...


5

It should be fine. The acidity of the vinegar would be an issue if it were to come into contact and react with bare metal. Non-stick cookware is fine for, say, making tomato sauces, etc, which means the coating in not especially reactive to acidity, which makes rice vinegar okay. As a confirming point, when I was walking through Costco yesterday, I saw ...


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