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183

The simplest trick is to place all the contaminated rice in the detergent box in the nearest trash bin, then obtain new rice. When it comes to cheap food staples like rice it's not worth the risk of eating tainted product, specially with substances that can wreak havoc on your digestive system like detergents.


89

This is sometimes called "pilaf style", though technically actual pilafs do not require the sauteeing step. It is, however, very common in pilaf and related dishes. The main function of this is to change the composition of the starch on the surface of the rice. This reduces the starches that cross-link and make rice sticky. It helps your rice to cook up ...


80

Apart from water, rice is mainly made from starch. Starch is initially packed in a crystalline structure that is not soluble. However if you soak it for long enough or expose it to heat, the starch slowly 'unpacks' and binds with water, resulting in a soluble compound. This is called starch gelatinization, and is what you are aiming for when you soak your ...


58

I’m afraid you may have misunderstood some results (or they were unclear in their descriptions). A ballpark number for rice volume is that cooking white rice will give you about triple the dry rice volume. So let’s look at your data: 1/4 cup of raw rice makes 3/4 cups of cooked rice. The calories don’t change, assuming that you add just water and don’t pour ...


50

I come from a culture where rice is our staple and I have a rice cooker. Here are some of the advantages from my perspective: Rice is perfect everytime – not stuck to the bottom, not watery, not mushy and stuck together, etc. If you make rice in a pot, and the heat is too high, it will boil and spill over creating a mess. You can switch the rice cooker on ...


50

It's toasted vermicelli. This dish is called şehriyeli pilav in Turkey, riz bi sh’arieh in Lebanon and Syria, shehrehi yeghintz in Armenia, and reshteh polo in Iran. The basic idea is that you brown the noodles in a little bit of oil or butter, then add rice and cook basically as you would cook steamed rice. Below are four sample recipes. Note that the ...


47

Don't eat the smelly rice because it is probably irremediably mixed with chemicals that may be harmful. But you may use that non-edible rice for other purpose detailed below. The rice smells like detergent because it absorbs very well what you mix with or around it. If you have a new/old or hard to clean container/board that smells weird, you can put that ...


43

For me it isn't fried rice without toasted sesame oil, and the fried rice I have had in restaurants always tastes to me as if it contains toasted sesame oil. Peas are pretty required too. BTW, La Choy is synthetic soy sauce, it was at the very bottom of the America's Test Kitchen taste testing of soy sauce (sorry, paywalled), the only soy sauce to get a "not ...


37

That's fine. A lot of people actually do that on purpose, it's referred to as "soaking". It will shave a bit off the cooking time and won't negatively affect the rice at all. Give it a stir before you start cooking. You can drain and rinse it too if you want, that will give you very separate, distinct grains. Use about 1/4 less water for cooking if you do it ...


37

Reasons to wash your rice: Reduce/Control Starch levels Often when you're cooking rice you want distinct grains of rice and for your rice to have texture. In the case of Chinese fried rice for example, you specifically want your rice grains to not stick to one another. If you're talking white rice especially, there will be a lot more loose starch that will ...


29

This is based on what I was taught by a Chinese cook when I worked in his restaurant at age seventeen. Any compliments should be directed at old Tommy Wu. Any complaints may be due to my imperfect memory. His process was both similar and different in some respects from yours. Use day-old cooked cold white rice. Spending the night refrigerated will make it ...


26

People choose to eat vegetarian diets for a number of reasons. Not only might the flavor offend your guest, but it may cause them to be physically ill. You can substitute vegetable stock or broth for the meat products you are accustomed to using. Mushrooms lend a meaty flavor to dishes they are used in and could potentially be used to replace your meat. I ...


25

Most likely yes, it has stuff besides water. Although I wouldn't lay my hand in the fire that it has it every single time. The first scenario is the bubbling from starchy water, as Chris H already explained. This is not ruled out by "the assumption that the food has not made contact with the lid", since here it is the cooking water that makes ...


23

Once you get the hang of it, rice is as easy as pasta. One thing you say in the question that may be central to the difficulty you are having is that your lid is "half-closed". For the majority of rice cooking methods, not only should you keep the lid tightly closed, but you shouldn't even open it to check the rice until it has cooked close to long enough ...


22

I'm afraid you interpret the tables wrong. You aren't destroying calories, you are adding water (=0 cal) to the dry rice. As the rice absorbs the water, you are in fact measuring rice + water for cooked rice. This is true for calorie tables that measure by volume (like here) and by weight. If you are cooking your rice by boiling and straining, you are ...


21

First, use basmati rice. Then, rinse your rice very well. Place rice in bowl, fill with cold water, drain, repeat until the water runs clear. I find that using the correct variety of rice, combined with good rinsing, helps keep the long grains separate.


21

Starchy foods, like rice, tend to bubble and splash. They will get starch on the inside of the lid. If you don't let it dry out, you might decide a quick rinse is sufficient, but if it dries it will probably need a proper wash to remove the starch. Steaming is more interesting. There shouldn't be any splashing above the level of the food, so it should ...


20

You can cook rice like pasta, boiling in excess water until done then draining. But there are a couple main reasons not to: You'll wash away a lot of the starch. Especially for starchier varieties (short and medium grain), this may not be a good thing - you'll end up with distinct grains, not nice fluffy, slightly sticky rice. It can be a pain to drain ...


20

Arsenic reduction To add to what @ShiftyThomas said Now, some ways of cooking rice reduce arsenic levels more than others. We carried out some tests with Prof Meharg and found the best technique is to soak the rice overnight before cooking it in a 5:1 water-to-rice ratio. That cuts arsenic levels by 80%, compared to the common approach of using two ...


19

I haven't had that happen since the 1980's. Sound like the Flour Moth. Freezing Rice or Flour for 3-4 days will kill the eggs. I usually freeze local flour/rice for a few days so that I don't have to deal with any potential problem. If you have pantry moths, or other moths that have hatched, you may need to take extra measures to get rid of them. Once they ...


17

I did this in my restaurant for years, it really does work great. Make your rice in a huge batch, cook it as if you're planning to eat it then, but then let it cool until handlable. Once it is cool enough, bag it in individual servings and freeze it. Refrigerating cooked rice quickly ruins it, freezing it, however, works great. If your servings are fairly ...


17

If you can, put all grains you buy in impenetrable containers as soon as you get them home, and freeze them. Keeping rice (or any other grain) in the freezer for a full day will help. Keeping the grain in the freezer for a week will kill just about any creepy crawly that's already in the rice, the impenetrable container will keep new visitors out. Glass or ...


17

I think it's called furikake. Per Wikipedia: Furikake is a dry Japanese seasoning meant to be sprinkled on top of cooked rice, vegetables, and fish. It typically consists of a mixture of dried fish, sesame seeds, chopped seaweed, sugar, salt, and monosodium glutamate.


17

I don't think you'll find the information you are looking for, for multiple reasons: The most direct one: because the same pan can serve well a really wide range of rations. We've cooked excellent paellas with the same pan from 4 up to 30+. (more or less 80cm pan) The most practical reason: You usually WANT to cook too much paella, because the leftovers ...


16

It’s a funny thing, I’ve written 2 answers this week saying you should never refrigerate leftover rice, that refrigerating rice ruins it and that you should freeze it instead. Of course there is an exception to every rule, in this case that exception would be when you want leftover, refrigerated rice. I do have a method to get that leftover refrigerated ...


16

I might suggest that one thing that most home cooks are missing in comparison to a restaurant is heat. You aren't going to get the same results as a restaurant without the blazing wok that a restaurant uses. You can get closer by letting your wok get blazing hot before adding oil and quickly cooking small quantities of food at a time. Alternatively, if you ...


16

Please see the excerpt below from this page . There is also a chart that lists different types of long, medium, and short grain rices and their characteristics and usage examples. Rice is composed of two different types of starch molecules: amylose and amylopectin. The amounts of these two starches determine the texture of rice when it is cooked. ...


16

There are many different ways of cooking rice, and you might not want to use a rice cooker if you really want individual grains, as it was developed for cuisines / rice varieties that are stickier. Although moscafj mentioned basmati, which is a very long grain variety of rice that's from India, and tends to cook up less sticky ... you might also consider &...


15

The following excerpt answers questions 1 and 2. Additionally it reduces the cooking time for the parboiled rice. Also known as converted rice, parboiled rice has been pressure-steamed and then dried in its natural outer husk (which is later removed). This process hardens the starch in the grains so they remain firmer, less sticky, and separate when ...


15

Kenji López-Alt from Serious Eats dealt with the exact same issue (section Rule #2: plan in advance if you can, but don't worry if you don't). To sum up his findings: Rice only need to be dry, not stale (hence making rice one day in advance is not necessary) Drying the freshly cooked rice by spreading it on a tray and putting it under a fan for one hour ...


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