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9

I'm going to copy/paste my answer from https://cooking.stackexchange.com/a/93753/42066 because I still disagree with the usual methods posted... TL:DR - use less water, allow 'drying time' afterwards. I'm going to go contra to pretty much all the advice so far, but this is how I've been cooking rice for 25 years... Clear-lidded pans make this far less ...


8

Some will say no, some will say yes. I'm in the yes camp. If you want to make paella, and that's the only rice you have on hand, don't let anyone stop you. Use this as a learning experience. Be warned that the rice might be stickier than other type or rice, especially paella rice, so be careful about the amount of liquid used. Rinse the rice thoroughly ...


6

The recipe calls for simmering 30 mins, baking 30 mins, resting 10 mins. This isn't quite an accurate representation of the recipe. The recipe calls for baking cauliflower and eggplant for 20 minutes each prior to assembly. Once assembled, the rice gets simmered for 30 minutes. Then the completed dish rests for 10 minutes. The cook times will likely not ...


5

Yes, absolutely! Sauces can have loads of salt, it all depends on how much you added. You have to look at your ingredients to find the source of the salt in your dish, and then reduce one or more of them: Rice: often rice is cooked with salt, if your rice is salty to begin with then adding other salty ingredients could make it too salty. If you plan to add ...


4

A risotto and a pilaf are very different dishes from what is happening during the cooking process. In a risotto, you want the starch to come out of the rice to make the "sauce", whereas in a pilaf the rice is generally soaked, washed, then pre-fried in oil or butter to prevent excess starch causing the grains to stick together, or indeed a sauce forming. ...


4

Some rice cookers have a vent on the side, and there's a little cup with it that clips in there to catch the starchy moisture that might escape during cooking. If your rice cooker came with a small plastic cup (I say 'cup' as it's a container, but it's usually pretty flat so it doesn't stick out very far) that you couldn't figure out what it was for, this ...


4

I make rice porridge in the oven. I bring the rice and milk to a boil on the stove and then place the entire pot, lid on, in the oven on ~90 degrees C for 4-8 hours, depending on the amount of rice. I'm basically using a DIY slow cooker. I imagine there are methods involving an actual slow cooker as well. The total time for my method is longer, but you don't ...


4

Typically dehydrated foods of this sort are freeze-dried rather than dehydrated by heating. This is a process of sublimation of the water out of the food in a controlled manner under very low temperature conditions. This is generally not practical at home due to the nature of the equipment needed. However, it seems that the instant rice is dehydrated in ...


3

Rice can be a very dangerous food. It's always been recommended to me very strongly by my in-laws (Japanese, the family all together eats close to 1kg of rice a day) that rice, if not going to be eaten immediately, must either be left in the rice cooker on the 'keep warm' setting, or stored immediately in either the fridge (if you plan to eat it the next ...


3

You can indeed dehydrate cooked rice. It is a lack of water activity that is one factor which increases the safety of foods, so no problem there. Rice is no more problematic than other foods. As you probably know, dehydrated foods are a staple for camping and backpacking. So, cook your rice at home, then place in a food dehydrator. Once on the trail, a 5 ...


3

Calrose rice is a medium grain rice, it will probably work okay but it won't really have the right texture. If you are in the US there shouldn't be any problem finding short grain Arborio rice, which is all that paella rice is. You can spend a bomb on paella rice in fancy bags imported from half way across the world, but it isn't really a different product ...


3

When you cook things using water you add mass that have 0 calories. Some food, like rice, absorb that water. Hence boiling 100 grams of rice increase final mass to around 300 grams. Then again you measure the 100 grams carbs and it's 3 times less than your starting points because you never added additional carbs in the process. The fiber amount is IMHO ...


3

Seems there is no need to cook rice with salt, at least in my country or my friends who love the culinary. But if you really need some salty flavor in your rice, maybe you could: Turn your rice into fried rice, seasoning in the end. Make some yummy sauces and add onto your rice. Dissolve salt in water to become a salty solution, spray it on your rice ...


3

In my experiments with steamed rice and broken steamed rice so far, I haven't found any disadvantage to soaking rice overnight. The rice can be kept on the kitchen counter-top (no need for refrigeration). The rice absorbs a bit of water, but that didn't seem to make any difference in the cooking. It absorbed the usual amount of water (4 cups water for 1 cup ...


2

Yet another method for long-grain varieties, always handling carefully so as not to break the grains: Boil fairly vigorously in plenty of salted water, for 8 or 9 minutes, until not-quite cooked. (To the teeth, there should be no brittle snap of completely uncooked grain, but it should be a little firmer than you want to serve it) Strain well in a colander,...


2

This is how I cook my rice every time, typically brown - sometimes white or yellow. Each grain (of rice) is cooked, but separate, and tender. All of the water is absorbed. No burning or scorching. Measure 1C uncooked rice into saucepan. [No rinsing beforehand.] Add 2C water, a dash of salt and a smidge of butter (~1 tsp). Place the pan (with lid) on a ...


2

Uncover the pot and cook over low heat to evaporate the water. Or gently turn the rice out onto a baking sheet and dry it in a low oven. I also will pan-fry the rice in a non-stick pan to give it a drier appearance and seal the outside of the rice.


2

He uses Pudding Rice. When using Risotto rice, if one wants it more starchy and to cook into a creamy texture, one usually needs to stir for like 15 minutes. If at the end the result seems too dry, stir in a bit of milk at a time until you get the consistency you want.


2

Spraying a little Olive oil cooking spray on top of my actively-boiling-over rice made it stop boiling over immediately. Thanks!


2

A quick search does not really give a good answer to your question For example, one recipe calls for 2 pinch of saffron for 2 cups of (dry) rice; another 3/4 tea spoon of crumble saffron for 3 cups of rice. Have a looksie at this wikihow page. In any case, I would highly suggest you try to find either Spanish or Iranian saffron, and if possible not pre-...


1

It's likely that the brown rice was boiled and then drained; some of the starch would leach out into the cooking water and be removed with it, while the insoluble fiber would remain in the rice. Additionally, note that NAL's nutrition data was taken from various sources over a long period of time. It's possible that the data for raw and cooked rice was ...


1

When reheating any kind of rice, you will need to add water to it (with white rice, just covering the container with a damp paper towel works). However, brown rice does not reheat well at all; and from personal experience it is exactly how you describe it. So what we do when we cook rice for our meals, is we throw it in the rice cooker as we shower and get ...


1

I make paella regularly. I am either using a paella pan that fits into the top of my Big Green Egg, or a slightly smaller paella pan that I can use on my indoor gas range. Given your two choices, I would say that both would work just fine. You may have more direct control over the heat with the Iwatani, since the flame will be directly on the bottom of ...


1

While I start mine on the stovetop, it mainly cooks in the oven. That might help.


1

What you are describing sounds a lot like Belacan which is a very strong, very salty shrimp paste, that can be crunchy, as you describe, if you were to eat it by the spoonful. Around where I am (Northern Virginia) you would find ingredients like this in one of the Korean groceries, like H-Mart or Lotte. I snooped online looking for your small glass jars. ...


1

The "dissolved" starch is going to make a sauce or "gravy". Different sources of starch will have a somewhat different taste. So experiment a bit with different sources of starch and see which tastes best. You could even grind some of the brown rice in a mortar and pestle to get a brown rice flour that you could use for thickening. My experience with a ...


1

Generally you have to soak lentils for many hours, use a pressure cooker to soften them up or a combination of the two. Only masoor dal can be cooked straight away. So I'm guessing you missed a step in whatever recipe you are following.


1

If you cook rice for 200 people you could consider 100 grams per person so a total of 20kg. I'm making a lot of assumptions here, I know, like I have no idea what your other servings look like. As a general piece of advice and as semi-professional chef, I'd recommend to use grams at all times. Cups is a volume-based measurements and rice has a lot of air ...


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