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9

I'm going to copy/paste my answer from https://cooking.stackexchange.com/a/93753/42066 because I still disagree with the usual methods posted... TL:DR - use less water, allow 'drying time' afterwards. I'm going to go contra to pretty much all the advice so far, but this is how I've been cooking rice for 25 years... Clear-lidded pans make this far less ...


7

I don't have a completely definitive answer. However generally, fermentation produces lactic acid which inhibits the growth of harmful bacteria, which is why it is a successful food preservation method. The yeast and bacteria that are responsible for the fermentation are often naturally occurring on many raw foods. For example with lacto-fermented ...


6

The recipe calls for simmering 30 mins, baking 30 mins, resting 10 mins. This isn't quite an accurate representation of the recipe. The recipe calls for baking cauliflower and eggplant for 20 minutes each prior to assembly. Once assembled, the rice gets simmered for 30 minutes. Then the completed dish rests for 10 minutes. The cook times will likely not ...


5

The measuring cups that come with rice cookers are not the same size as a US cup (or indeed many other countries' cup measurements). A rice cooker cup is 180 ml, a US cup 240ml, and in a lot of places it's 250ml. This is because rice cooker designs originate from Japan. You're getting 30g, which is 2/3 of what you expect. For a US cup, 3/4 would be right,...


4

Some rice cookers have a vent on the side, and there's a little cup with it that clips in there to catch the starchy moisture that might escape during cooking. If your rice cooker came with a small plastic cup (I say 'cup' as it's a container, but it's usually pretty flat so it doesn't stick out very far) that you couldn't figure out what it was for, this ...


4

Those are all good ideas, and will work together. For "use more water", what you really want is to use more water but not end up with wetter or softer rice. (For rice I want to be sticky I'll generally use about 1.25 volumes of water to one volume of rinsed and drained rice, but this will vary widely with cooker and amount of rice.) A good way to do that is ...


4

In case anyone else was wondering too, I tried it and it worked fine. It's not exactly the same consistency as when using rice but I still enjoyed it very much.


4

A risotto and a pilaf are very different dishes from what is happening during the cooking process. In a risotto, you want the starch to come out of the rice to make the "sauce", whereas in a pilaf the rice is generally soaked, washed, then pre-fried in oil or butter to prevent excess starch causing the grains to stick together, or indeed a sauce forming. ...


3

Assuming it's been kept cold & is therefore 'safe', then just drop it into a larger microwave-safe dish with a not-quite-sealed lid & maybe a tablespoon of cold water. Once it's halfway heated, you'll be able to break it up a bit to stir. When fully heated, it will break up with a fork. Your family will never know ;)


3

When you cook things using water you add mass that have 0 calories. Some food, like rice, absorb that water. Hence boiling 100 grams of rice increase final mass to around 300 grams. Then again you measure the 100 grams carbs and it's 3 times less than your starting points because you never added additional carbs in the process. The fiber amount is IMHO ...


3

Probably no. Burnt rice will smell burnt and turn black and impact a lot of the rice. I've burn rice, and it ends by discarding everything. On the other hand, There is a brief moment between cooked rice and burnt rice when the rice on the bottom of the pan is just getting crispy, like the Paella's socarrat.


3

The simple explanation is firewood produces smoke and other sources of heat don't. Smoke imparts aroma and flavor to the dish. Firewood doesn't cook the rice any better than a gas or induction range or a rice cooker, it's just about the smoke.


3

Seems there is no need to cook rice with salt, at least in my country or my friends who love the culinary. But if you really need some salty flavor in your rice, maybe you could: Turn your rice into fried rice, seasoning in the end. Make some yummy sauces and add onto your rice. Dissolve salt in water to become a salty solution, spray it on your rice ...


3

In my experiments with steamed rice and broken steamed rice so far, I haven't found any disadvantage to soaking rice overnight. The rice can be kept on the kitchen counter-top (no need for refrigeration). The rice absorbs a bit of water, but that didn't seem to make any difference in the cooking. It absorbed the usual amount of water (4 cups water for 1 cup ...


3

Rice can be a very dangerous food. It's always been recommended to me very strongly by my in-laws (Japanese, the family all together eats close to 1kg of rice a day) that rice, if not going to be eaten immediately, must either be left in the rice cooker on the 'keep warm' setting, or stored immediately in either the fridge (if you plan to eat it the next ...


2

Yet another method for long-grain varieties, always handling carefully so as not to break the grains: Boil fairly vigorously in plenty of salted water, for 8 or 9 minutes, until not-quite cooked. (To the teeth, there should be no brittle snap of completely uncooked grain, but it should be a little firmer than you want to serve it) Strain well in a colander,...


2

This is how I cook my rice every time, typically brown - sometimes white or yellow. Each grain (of rice) is cooked, but separate, and tender. All of the water is absorbed. No burning or scorching. Measure 1C uncooked rice into saucepan. [No rinsing beforehand.] Add 2C water, a dash of salt and a smidge of butter (~1 tsp). Place the pan (with lid) on a ...


2

Uncover the pot and cook over low heat to evaporate the water. Or gently turn the rice out onto a baking sheet and dry it in a low oven. I also will pan-fry the rice in a non-stick pan to give it a drier appearance and seal the outside of the rice.


2

There is a QA about the differences between paella and risotto rice on this very site, but it doesn't really answer your question. For your purposes any arborio rice will do, the secret is to make it sticky using technique. Firstly, don't rinse the rice, you want to keep the starch, not wash it off. Next this you want to first put the rice and water into a ...


2

Acids lower the pH, making amylase less effective in breaking down starch into sugar. I believe with rice it helps remove the starch from the rice as well, so adding vinegar to rice will make it less sticky. Rinsing the rice well before cooking will also make it less sticky (because you're rinsing off the starch).


2

A quick search does not really give a good answer to your question For example, one recipe calls for 2 pinch of saffron for 2 cups of (dry) rice; another 3/4 tea spoon of crumble saffron for 3 cups of rice. Have a looksie at this wikihow page. In any case, I would highly suggest you try to find either Spanish or Iranian saffron, and if possible not pre-...


2

There shouldn't be extra water in your grains. If they are cooked properly and there is extra water you're using too much. If you do have extra water, however, drain it. Maybe save it for soup since it will have good things in it that you don't want to throw down the drain.


2

For what it's worth, I find it difficult to get brown rice cooked properly using any sort of regimented process. It seems sensitive to the variables involved, and it doesn't come out right without me being more involved in the cooking process. So, I follow the procedure which (if I recall correctly) I found in Cook's Illustrated: cook the rice in a much ...


1

Rice attracts quite a lot of moisture and may develop a moss-like smell in the longer run. Most of the rice that is used in India doesn't require airtight storage but shouldn't be exposed to moisture. Some of the aromatic rice varieties such as Basmati are sealed and aged for perfection. These types of rice may lose their aroma if kept in the open air. So ...


1

(Disclaimer, since I don't read/speak Farsi, I only looked at English references) Authenticity is in the eye of the Beholder. Iranian and Indians cooks probably use whatever rice is available in their local store; and some will use the same rice variety that their mother and grandmother used without knowing the reason. You can look at this which talks a ...


1

It's likely that the brown rice was boiled and then drained; some of the starch would leach out into the cooking water and be removed with it, while the insoluble fiber would remain in the rice. Additionally, note that NAL's nutrition data was taken from various sources over a long period of time. It's possible that the data for raw and cooked rice was ...


1

When reheating any kind of rice, you will need to add water to it (with white rice, just covering the container with a damp paper towel works). However, brown rice does not reheat well at all; and from personal experience it is exactly how you describe it. So what we do when we cook rice for our meals, is we throw it in the rice cooker as we shower and get ...


1

If the starch of unrinsed rice isn't enough - you can always add starch water solution, or honey but the latter is a more acquired taste.


1

I would be surprised if you find a precise enough scale to be useful in measuring saffron in a kitchen. A half gram of unground saffron will contain dozens if not hundreds of threads, and while ground saffron is less potent, it should still not require very much, so a pinch is probably roughly equivalent to a few strands.


1

I make paella regularly. I am either using a paella pan that fits into the top of my Big Green Egg, or a slightly smaller paella pan that I can use on my indoor gas range. Given your two choices, I would say that both would work just fine. You may have more direct control over the heat with the Iwatani, since the flame will be directly on the bottom of ...


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