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12

I agree with the suggestion that it is best to buy ripe citrus fruits. I respectfully disagree with the assertion that they don't ripen after picking. I stumbled across this ancient question today and looked at it because I have a lot of very immature oranges that I thinned off my orange tree a few weeks ago, and I wondered what gems of wisdom might have ...


11

You can get red jalapeños at some markets, but you're right, most places sell them when they're still green. They sell them for the same reasons they sell green bell peppers, which includes: some people prefer the milder, grassier notes (or just don't know better) they're cheaper to produce (don't have to wait for them to ripen, reducing water use) they ...


8

That fig doesn't look ripe to me... but I'm not seeing it in person. Based on the info on the site mentioned below, it's likely the fig is not ripe as the neck is very straight. Eating unripe figs won't hurt you, though... they just won't taste very good. Regardless, they should be slightly soft, not firm. According to this site, they will droop on their ...


8

If you don't want to use the unripened avocado right away, according to this site Store Cut Unripe Avocados - If you have cut open your... avocado and found it to be unripe, sprinkle the exposed flesh of the avocado with lemon or lime juice, place the two halves back together and cover tightly with clear plastic wrap before placing in the refrigerator. ...


8

It doesn't harm the apple, but it does speed up its ripening as well. And that risks over-ripening. So your perfectly crispy apples may begin to become mealy. Eventually they become targets for yeasts, molds, etc and start to rot. But it's not making them toxic or causing untoward chemical changes. They're all just speeding each other up. Yes, you can just ...


7

Starch content and sweetness: Bananas become sweeter as they ripen because the starch is broken down. An unripe banana is full of complex carbohydrates, but as it ripens, these are broken down into simple sugars which is why riper bananas are sweeter. The lower starch content and higher sugar content also means that the banana is digested more quickly, so it ...


6

This happened to me a few weeks ago. Two mangoes just plain would not ripen. I tried the window sill and paper bags. I bought two later and they ripened fine. So I took the first two back. The manager of the fruit department said the pallet is treated with ethylene to ripen the fruit, and sometimes the ethylene does not get to some spots.


5

According to Dole and Cooking for Engineers (which has an excellent article on a variety of fruits) pineapples do not ripen after picking but do change color. So it will be just as sweet when it is green and fresh as when it sat and turned yellow.


4

Iodine can be used reliably to measure starch content in bananas and it is correlated with sugar (soluble solids). Summary. A starch staining technique using pictures to rate starch disappearance has been developed to determine banana pulp maturity. The disappearance of starch from the pulp shows linear correlation with peel color (r = 0.76) and soluble ...


3

I too love sour blueberries. I usually shake the punnet gently in the shop, and if they 'rattle' like they're hard, they will often be fairly sour. If they just thud around quietly, they are probably ripe and sweet. The same theory can be applied to picking blueberries - go for the firmer ones. In the UK, the time of year that is best for sourness is ...


3

Blueberries don't continue to ripen after picking so finding those that are blue and tart can be a challenge. If you see berries that are slightly purple or red, they may have been picked early and be a bit tart. If you're in an area where blueberries are raised, you might visit early in the season, which is late July to mid August. Picking your own might ...


3

Well it's possible they are over ripe. Acorn squash should be dark green or mostly so when it's ready to eat. It turns orange when it's ripe, but just like many circubits and cucirbits (squashes and melons(including cucumber)) you don't want to eat them when they are ripe, you eat them before they start to ripen. How you store them makes a difference in the ...


3

First, as a gardener who's grown these, I can tell you that acorn squash — like all winter squash — need to be left on the vine to ripen. After picking, they will get a little sweeter as they sit for a couple weeks, but if picked too early, they won't actually continue to ripen. That said, there's no great trick to picking a good one. If you see some some ...


3

Ripe pears range from as firm as soft wood (think balsa) to as soft as a sponge when ripe, depending on the variety. If your store-bought pears are hard for more than a week, then you bought ones which were picked too young and will never really ripen. This is a common issue with supermarket produce. Ripe apples are generally always firm, even when ripe....


3

Someone taught me a method that hasn't failed me yet: the "reverse turkey-timer" (as I call it). You could gently squeeze an avocado to see if it's soft, but I think you're more likely to feel bruising than ripeness. Other shoppers (like you!) could have damaged it with aggressive squeeze-testing, and unless you have the luxury of local fruit (it's a berry!)...


3

In my experience, avocados with this behavior are normally picked too early. Although all avocados are picked early in commercial settings because of transit to market timing, when they are picked TOO early they begin to mature as "seeds" before they actually ripen. The flesh becomes fiberous, rather than soft, as the seed prepares to germinate. ...


2

Fruit ripening is largely caused by a plant hormone called ethylene, which is a gas. Most fruits give off ethylene in ever increasing quantities as they ripen. Temperature is a key determinant of chemical reaction rates and therefore, produce (fruits and vegetables) metabolic rates. Ethylene production increases as temperature rises. Ripening for most fruit ...


2

Place the mango in a bowl with raw popcorn seeds. My boyfriend is from Jalisco, Mexico, and his mother is used to ripen them in this way.


2

Whatever the historic reason was: Nowadays it is probably "because customers expect them to be green and taste like a green jalapeno". Possible reason why jalapenos are among those preferred green: They have a very saturated green color (unlike the pale green of some other annuum varieties), smooth skin and regular shape, so they look good as rings for ...


2

You can ripen an avocado in one day by double wrapping in foil and placing in low (250°) oven for +/- 30 minutes. Check by pressing lightly until avocado is starting to soften. Check every 15 minutes. Remove from oven and let sit on counter still wrapped in foil for an hour. Remove foil and let cool completely before using. I have used this method ...


2

It's a matter of taste. Since your durian is already cut, as it continues to ripen (which it will, although much more slowly than uncut fruit) it is also rotting/fermenting (which is desired by many). You don't say where you are from, but durian season is long over in the northern hemisphere. Most durian sold in the US this time of year has been frozen. ...


2

If you can put the two halves back together with the pit in the center, vacuum seal it. This will prevent it from drying out or turning black from oxidation. Another possible way to protect it from oxidation without affecting the taste/texture of the avocado would be to coat all the exposed area in a thick layer of avocado oil


2

That behaviour is due to being pick very immature at source or held too long in cold during the distribution process. It's either of those.


2

From epicurious (I love their YouTube channel): You can buy hard, green guavas and allow them to ripen at room temperature. Placing them in a paper bag with a banana or apple will allow them to ripen faster. Guavas may be treated with edible wax to delay the ripening process, so you may want to rinse them off to speed ripening.


1

No this not ok to cook because it looks like that it is rotten.


1

In unripe bananas a lot of the starch is made up of resistant starch. Green bananas may contain between 35.14 and 45.87% of resistant starch (in Thai bananas) which varies depending on the variety of banana. Source: Chemical Compositions and Resistant Starch Content in Starchy Foods


1

No. Ripening is a specific chemical process. Baking the bananas has a similar effect in sweetening the fruit, but it is not the same as ripening, which is a process which occurs after exposure to ethylene gas (in a supermarket banana at least). Given that your diet seems very specific about the carbohydrates, I wouldn't diverge from its recommendations.


1

The only negative I have ever seen is that the other fruit also ripens (particularly as bananas are themselves one of the most effective producers of ethylene). I don't think I'd put an apple in with a banana, myself, only because the banana will make plenty of ethylene gas; it seems like the apple wouldn't add all that much.


1

I've ripened a pineapple at home after buying - turn upside down in a vase, works great!! Turns from green to more of a yellow-greenish color - bottoms always ripen first. Don't ripen too long though.


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