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21 votes

Can you slow down the time it takes for dough to rise?

Yes, you can easily slow down the rising time by lowering the temperature of the dough ("retarding" it, as the pros say). You can either put it in a cool place or refrigerate it; the colder it is, the ...
SourDoh's user avatar
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20 votes
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Why do my breadmaker loaves rise unevenly top to bottom

I think there is one major problem here, and my answer is based on my experience using a breadmaker, which is not the same make as OP's. I had a similar problem when first using a breadmaker and ...
bob1's user avatar
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18 votes
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Difference between letting yeast dough rise cold and slowly or warm and quickly

Retarding fermentation allows, as you wrote, different and additional metabolic pathways to have a greater influence on the flavour. In addition, extended enzymatic activity of the flour has a ...
wumpus D'00m's user avatar
  • 4,051
15 votes

Converting bread recipes for an overnight rise?

There are no strict formulas or conversions, the mathematics of bread baking are too complex for such predictions. Rising at room temperature overnight is not recommended, it is generally way too warm ...
rumtscho's user avatar
  • 139k
10 votes
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Long-rising/no-knead enriched breads?

This is a wonderful occasion for a cold rise! There are two main methods to prepare yeast doughs, warm or cold. The first is probably what you are familiar with - lukewarm liquid, a cozy spot for the ...
Stephie's user avatar
  • 60.1k
9 votes

Can non expired yeast go bad?

Yeast is a living thing. Unfortunately, yeast can't read. If your yeast was exposed to conditions that killed or damaged it, most likely extreme temperatures, you will not get the results you expect ...
gnicko's user avatar
  • 1,067
8 votes
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Cake not rising - too many wet ingredients?

I would suggest viewing it a different way: the recipe did not fail. It is most likely performing exactly as expected by its author. First, there is the matter of the different pan. You might ...
rumtscho's user avatar
  • 139k
7 votes

What size bowl for bread

Margalo is missing a detail in their otherwise good answer: Many bread recipes use two rises, one after mixing ("bulk rise"), one after shaping and before the bread goes into the oven. For the first ...
Stephie's user avatar
  • 60.1k
7 votes

How do you know if your starter is powered mainly by yeast or bacteria?

Unfortunately many kinds of fermentation produce CO2 as a byproduct, so the presence of bubbles hardly give you more information than 'it is alive'. If what you want is a precise identification of ...
greedyscholars's user avatar
7 votes
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Rising pizza dough in the fridge after punching it?

There is no emergency, you have a healthy, active dough. You can punch it down as much as you like, remember that with pizza dough you are going to knock a load of air out when you make your pizza ...
GdD's user avatar
  • 76.7k
6 votes

Working with a slack (sticky) sourdough

As you know, as the bread proves a matrix of bubbles is formed. And just like blowing soap bubbles, the bigger they get the more fragile the bubbles are. When you bake in pans you can let bread rise ...
Spagirl's user avatar
  • 3,244
5 votes

What went wrong with this cake?

I'd lower the temperature. You'll have to experiment. I think what happened is that the bottom quickly cooked and sealed. As your liquid ingredients turned to steam an air pocket was created, which ...
Philip Tinney's user avatar
5 votes

Can you slow down the time it takes for dough to rise?

For smaller items (rolls, typically, but I think it'd work for breadsticks), I'll let the dough proof the first time, shape it and place onto a sheet pan, cover it to prevent drying out, and then put ...
Joe's user avatar
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5 votes
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What size bowl for bread

The shape of the container can also be helpful (or make more difficult) the evaluation of "how much did that rise" - if you are looking for "doubled" it's much easier to see that in a fairly straight-...
Ecnerwal's user avatar
  • 18.1k
5 votes

Bread baking: dough has little holes after first rise

What kind of whole wheat flour are you using? An organic supermarket near me offers a mill to use on-site, and I once bought a package of wheat and milled it there, to see how bread tastes with ...
rumtscho's user avatar
  • 139k
5 votes

Can I rescue an old cake mix?

How something has been stored is almost as important as how long it's been stored. If the packaging is intact, and it was stored in a cool, dark place, odds are that it will still rise just fine. If ...
Joe's user avatar
  • 80.9k
5 votes

Converting bread recipes for an overnight rise?

This is a supplementary answer. There are apps for calculating the ingredients for overnight rise. For example, I use PizzApp which has yeast ratios for long rises, either at room temp or ...
FuzzyChef's user avatar
  • 65.3k
4 votes

How do I keep cake from collapsing when adding lemon juice?

I think your fat-to-flour ratio for that kind of flour might be too high. Cake flour can't handle a lot of fat. As another answer suggested, try a higher protein flour--start with all-purpose (AP) ...
chris's user avatar
  • 49
4 votes

Will my bizcocho dominicano cake rise?

Sorry, but no. The baking powder aids in making the cake light, but the main "rising agent" is actually the air incorporated in the batter by patient whipping, together with the eggs. Now if you ...
Stephie's user avatar
  • 60.1k
4 votes

Can you slow down the time it takes for dough to rise?

Yes you can slow things down by cooling the dough somehow but there's no real need to. I frequently leave dough to rise for several hours when it's still in the bowl and unshaped. If I'm in, I'll ...
BWFC's user avatar
  • 327
4 votes

What went wrong with this cake?

This looks very much like a bad recipe, which has trouble leavening. You say you used gluten-free flour. The problem is that there is not a gluten free flour, there are multiple mixes and none ...
rumtscho's user avatar
  • 139k
4 votes

For how long can you let dough sit there to rise without yeast?

I am not sure where you read this and it is a reasonable expectation that it would work. This is however a classic example of recipes authored by someone that worked in a certain climate, season, ...
user110084's user avatar
  • 2,756
4 votes

What are some pros/cons of restarting a bread machine mid-cycle?

I'm not familiar with how bread machines even work, so I'm not sure if you mean that you are restarting the cycle and that means that (A) you are just mixing the dough longer, or (B) the dough mixes, ...
mrwienerdog's user avatar
  • 5,811
4 votes
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Rising dough with closed/airtight lid?

Most containers are not completely airtight. If you are worried that something like a cambro container seals too tightly, you can cover it with a baking tray or square plate, rather than the original ...
LSchoon's user avatar
  • 4,869
4 votes

Bread dough flattens during final proof & almost no oven spring

I can't see anything that wrong, it looks like you are getting a decent crumb and crust so you probably aren't that far off. Here's a few thoughts: The middle looks denser than the outside, I suspect ...
GdD's user avatar
  • 76.7k
3 votes

Bread baking: dough has little holes after first rise

Its hard to tell from the photos, but it looks dry. Dough will have holes like that and will tear easily if you make it too dry. If the exterior is dry, you also will need to make sure its covered ...
Evan Nowak's user avatar
3 votes

Chewy, Moist & Bit Uncooked Bread

I think you over-kneaded and over-proofed your dough. When using a pre-ferment you are supposed to use it as an ingredient in your dough, mixing it in before kneading. Kneading is not a great way of ...
GdD's user avatar
  • 76.7k
3 votes

should I let my sourdough loaf proof in the fridge or on the counter?

Speed is not the point. Speed is the opposite of the point. Refrigerator rising makes for a long, slow rise and flavor development - it's not unique to sourdough, it's very common in pizza dough (...
Ecnerwal's user avatar
  • 18.1k
3 votes

Bread baking: dough has little holes after first rise

Garlic, dried herbs, and the bran of whole wheat can all "poke holes" in your dough. You have gluten, but you also have a bunch of "knife equivalents" poking holes and cutting gluten strands. You ...
Ecnerwal's user avatar
  • 18.1k
3 votes
Accepted

Unwanted rise in Japanese Cheesecake

Building upon what @Joe already mentioned. The cheesecake rises because as the temperature of the air trapped inside the mix goes up it tends to move upwards. This creates an effective spring force ...
greedyscholars's user avatar

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