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33

I would not use any vinegar. You will not want the sour taste that vinegar will leave. You will have a better final result if you just omit the wine. If you feel like it needs a little acidity at the end add a light squeeze of lemon (or even a couple of drops of vinegar). However, I've made risotto plenty of times without wine or extra acid...no problem!


17

Yes, all it is, is flavour. Apple juice and grape juice are 2 things I've used in the past for non-alcohol people. You can also get away with not using anything as a replacement as long as you use enough of everything else (butter and Parmesan etc). Wine just gives a little depth and a sort of 'freshness'. Edit: I just read the vegetarian part of your ...


16

I've made risotto plenty of times without wine (as it's not something that I typically keep in my house). The main issue is that wine is both acidic (which can affect how quickly things break down when cooking, like onions), and it's a solvent (so it helps to distribute other flavors). Although it does add some flavor on its own, you typically won't miss ...


11

The important part of making risotto is that you're moving it around in a little bit of liquid, so you end up scraping of the outside of the rice, causing the loose starch to thicken the remaining liquid to a creamy consistency. The overall dish should be creamy but not mushy, with the individual grains of rice still having some firmness to them. As for ...


11

All due respect, it's a myth. You don't need to add liquid slowly. Perhaps there used to be a reason (maybe years ago rice was processed differently), but at this point you're pretty much wasting your time constantly stirring. Many cooking publication/blog has a "no stir" risotto. You can check out Serious Eats - which has a great breakdown of ...


11

Risotto is a common dish down my parts of the woods, being so close to Italy and all. Making your fist few risottos might seem a tad overwhelming with all the tiny details and tricks that recipes will hit you with, but you'll soon get a hang of it and think nothing of it. One 'seasoned advice' though - to keep it fairly moist and remove from the heat while ...


11

What moscafj says is true, but it doesn't explain specifically for risotto. Basically, the creaminess** is because of a starch-based solution. Starch based solutions are temperature dependent and will get much thicker as it cools. If there's enough starch, it can solidify to the point where the sauce will break into pieces if you try to manipulate it. ** ...


8

Based on your edit, my best guess is that this particular rice has a really high amount of surface starch, which gelatinized when you first tried to cook it (liquid from the mushrooms might have been enough to get this result). That would have created a moisture-resistant layer around the grains that inhibited moisture from soaking in further. Your soak ...


8

Yes, you can, although I'd suggest adding a little sugar to it to offset the sharpness of the vinegar. About 1 tsp in 3/4 cup of vinegar should do it. However, if your rice vinegar is "seasoned rice vinegar", then it already has sugar in it (and salt). Add no sugar, and decrease any salt you'd normally add by 1/2 tsp. Other substitutes that work for the ...


7

For the risotto to be "creamy", the rice starch need to be released slowly. You add the hot liquid (water, broth, bouillon) slowly to let the rice absorb it and let the rice release some of its starch to the remaining liquid. Adding the liquid slowly also let you control the cooking more closely, you can then add a little bit more or stop adding when your ...


7

Using hot plates allows food to retain it's heat between plating a service...also works with cold plates, if you want to keep something cold.


6

I've found that cooking methods make a much greater difference than using either 'Paella' or 'Risotto' rice. I used to source rice for my Paella very carefully but I now buy risotto rice in bulk and I cannot tell the difference in the finished product. Providing that it is minimally stirred and not too much stock is added, risotto rice is perfectly adequate ...


6

I just made mushroom/truffle risotto for lunch! No joke!! Here's what to do with the dried. First, rinse thoroughly, they're infamous for grit. Now soak them for one half an hour in a little bowl of the broth (hot) you intend to use for the risotto. No need to remove stems, just chop them up with the rest. After one half an hour, wring them out, using your ...


5

Agreeing with Trey Jackson But there is also a reason to add stock slowly that's because the person hasn't made it enough times to know how much stock is require for a certain amount of rice And if you don't know how much stock is needed and you dump stock in halfway and don't stir it, the stock will sit on top while the bottom burns. And that's how the ...


5

The best characterization of "translucent" I can give here is that it looks like, if you held it up to light, some light might make it through. But of course, it's at the bottom of a pot, so there's no light to shine through. When it starts out, it's got a good layer of white, powdery-looking starch firmly stuck to the outside of the rice. As you cook and ...


5

There is no special chemical reaction. Melted fats are glossy, look at any oil in a bottle. When you add the butter, it coats the rice, and this coat of fat is glossy. That's all there is to it. I don't know the exact explanation of why all oils are glossy, but it probably involves quantum physics. You could ask it on Physics or Chemistry SE, it is ...


4

I live at 7500' and have noticed it requires approx 50% more broth and time than the recipe on the back of the bag of arborio rice calls for. This is due mainly to the fact that the boiling point is affected greatly by air pressure, so the higher above sea level you are, the lower the boiling point. For me it is around 198 degrees. Thats 14 degrees less ...


4

What are the best substitutes for arborio risotto rice? Your best replacement would be another short grain, or in a pinch, medium grain rice. (if it's a variety that doesn't cook up creamy enough for your liking ... you can cheat and after you remove it from the heat, quickly stir in a beaten egg) And how about when your only choices are all the local ...


4

You can usually substitute vegetable or meat stocks for the wine/alcohol in savory dishes.


4

As far as I know, most (*) restaurant will prepare risotto in advance, will prepare the basic recipe and undercook it a little bit; cool it quickly and portion it put in the fridge/freezer and then when ready to serve, they reheat and add flavouring. See this : http://www.seriouseats.com/2017/05/how-to-make-ahead-risotto.html Is the risotto used for a ...


3

There is only one general principle for risotto: Cook short grain rice long enough for the starches to be liberated and gelatinize. This results in the distinctive, pudding-like, creaminess. Everything else is variable and for flavor. In particular boosting the umami to heartbreaking levels. Stock and wine have more flavor than water. The alcohol in wine ...


3

Since I'm a picky Risotto eater, I usually only make the one kind of flavoured Risotto (Cranberry,Mushrooms, Ramson, PineNuts,S&P) & I use my granny's foundation recipe, that does calls for wine, but she and I both substitute the wine with juice made from Elderberries. But if I don't have EBjuice at hand, I add a splash of Lime or Lemon, and up the ...


3

It's not necessarily the wine that is necessary, it's more of the freshness and acidity. You can imitate this by adding a little bit of citrus (lemon) to brighten it up. Fresh herbs may help too!


3

It should be obvious as you're cooking. When you start, the rice is opaque, looking like little sticks of chalk. As you cook it in oil, it'll take on a look more like frosted glass. It's not clear, but it's not fully opaque, either. I won't say that gets to be fully translucent ... just not opaque as when you start. It's more similar to cooked onions ...


3

Par cooking, if done properly, will not change the texture of the rice. The key is to cool quickly! Then make sure stock is very hot and rice is at room temp when finishing off. This will basically pick up the cooking process exactly where you originally left off at since you cooled it quickly thus limiting the continuation of the cooking process. Biggest ...


2

I've worked with a solution that I did not see mentioned here. We served risotto every half hour. This was in a shared-plate restaurant, so it worked really well. Even if a table ordered a risotto at the very beginning of a new batch, we could always buy time on the table with appetizers, salads, etc. Other answers here suggest that you can par-cook ...


2

Short answer is that you forget about the time in any recipe, more or less. When you get around a minute or so from the intended time you start tasting the risotto for doneness. It should have a bite without being hard. If you run out of cooking liquid and the risotto isn't done, just add more liquid. If you are using stock and you don't want any more flavor ...


2

Risotto is a method as much as it is a single dish. You can make it with a wide variety of grains--or even pasta. You may not get the same creamy texture as with the classic rice based dish, but the results can be good in their own way. If you google barley rissotto, you will find a goodly number of recipes. In general, they do not require pre-cooking ...


2

The biggest mistake I see when people make risotto is they add way too much liquid. If you add too much liquid most of it evaporates than gets absorbed by the grain. While risotto is a "cook it until it's done" recipe as @Joe stated, there are some "rules": 1/2 cup of stock per session and never stop stirring At about the 20 minute mark, with Arborio, it ...


1

I love risotto. A few things might help. Use a saucepan, not a skillet. I had never really noticed a difference until ElendilTheTall (another user here) pointed it out. It makes a big difference. So you should have 2 sauce pans on the stove, one for your simmering broth, one for the rice. Brown your aromatics and your mushrooms well in butter and oil and ...


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