12

If we're talking about a solid, four pound cut of beef - the only flavor you're ever really going to get is on the exterior and just a little bit into the interior of the meat. That said, cooking in the spices/components you list still may provide liquid gold. I would simply take some of the liquid that's leftover in the slow cooker after the roast has ...


9

For the US crowd, silverside is the part of the round closest to sirloin, so it's a working cut and fairly lean. In order to keep this juicy you'll need to bard it, in other words add fat. I'd do this by wrapping the whole thing up in streaky (US style) bacon and then sear it at high temperature to give it that crust before turning it down and continue the ...


7

Most recipes I am aware of simply press crushed pepper onto the steak. It is true that some will fall off, but these recipes apply pepper generously with that in mind. I have not come across the egg white method (not sure I want egg white on my steak), but I did see a recipe that adds crushed pepper to melted butter, then coating the steak with the mixture, ...


7

If you add some liquid to the pan as well as covering it tightly, it should be fine. I'd suggest browning the joint well in a frying pan, slicing plenty of onions, resting the joint on them in the roasting tray, and then adding an inch or so of water to the pan before covering. This should keep the joint moist. With a bit of luck you'll also get some nice ...


6

The crucial observation is that cooking a smaller cut does reduce the cooking time, but not that much. Cheap cuts contain connective tissue, which consists of collagen. Converting the collagen into gelatine takes time. The conversion from collagen to gelantine begins at 70C (160F), so it important the braising keeps this temperature. How long the conversion ...


6

Pineapple contains Bromelain, which is "one of the most popular proteases to use for meat tenderizing." Since it's sold as a meat tenderizer, I'd say it really just depends on how long you marinate with it -- it's possible to over-tenderize something. This warns about over marinating, and mentions recommended times: The same process that tenderizes ...


4

Any butcher can probably get you a Joint of Sirloin by request, but you will not likely find it "on the shelf". A "Joint of Sirloin" is a rare cut in the US given the other possible uses of the sirloin. If one looks at the T-Bone/Porterhouse cuts, where the the "T"-bone bi-sects the steak. The smaller side is the tenderloin and the larger side is sirloin. ...


4

Leave it uncut, if you slice it now your slices will dry out more.


4

I think there is a place for both. Without being aware of the particulars of this received wisdom/commandments from on high, it is a little hard to say. Seasoning of meat is often performed before searing (think steaks), but this is commonly only in the form of a thin layer of salt and pepper and maybe herbs too, not a thick complete covering. I have also ...


4

If it's too tough, keep cooking it. Some people use "tender" to describe a pot roast that is tender like a good steak, others want it to fall apart with no knife required. I regularly cook pot roast 8-12 hours. As log as you have it covered for most of the time (like in a crock pot or in the over covered with foil), it will keep getting more tender until it ...


3

Silverside is one of those cuts that varies a lot, I've had topsides and silversides that came out reasonably tender and juicy, and I've had ones where I need power tools to cut them, even when I do everything right. They're cuts I avoid as a result. Silverside is a cut that comes from the rear of the animal, it doesn't have much marbling and does a fair ...


3

The meat will slice better if chilled first. Just put it in the fridge and slice when you want. I often find myself looking for a better way as I always like it better when fresh cooked and still warm, but that has always been an obstacle as you only eat a certain amount. Then the rest is left. Ticket is that meat will always slice easier when cold.


3

Eye of round can be difficult to cook. A roast tends to produce the best results, but it can be cooked in steak form as well. There are a couple of directions you can go. First is to cook it as a steak, but do not take it past Medium Rare. Marinate before cooking. Slice it thinly after cooking, across the grain. Serve with sauce. Think London Broil. If ...


3

Put the meat in a sous-vide bag, and place that in your crock pot with the vegetables.


3

It's probably less to do with the amount of juices that came out of the rib roast and more to do with the extended caramelisation of those juices produced by overcooking. Those burnt, caramelised bits left in the bottom of the pan are full of flavour and it's probably that, that added so much more flavour to your gravy than you're used to. Just replicate it ...


2

You are not giving very much information to provide a quality answer. From a safety point of view, yes, you can absolutely cook them like steaks. From a quality and palatability point of view, that may not be ideal, depending on where the roast from which the steak were cut came from on the animal. The question is, are they better suited to rapid, high ...


2

I had the same problem for months. My final solution was to beat up the roast a bit before I put in the slow cooker, and occasionally stab a few holes in the roast so the tasty liquids can get inside. I also reuse the left over liquid as a gravy. Presentation wise the roast looks like it got hit by a truck, but who cares when every bite is juicy and tasty.


2

We walked in the door and the delicious aroma filled the whole house. This is actually a strong hint as to what might be going wrong. Whenever you smell a delicious aroma during cooking, that's aromatic compounds that would otherwise add lots of flavor being lost to the air. When simmering a sauce, for example, it's not just water that is boiling away. If ...


2

I agree with bob1 regarding burning and impeding Maillard reaction. I would always limit pre searing seasoning to salt mainly with a little pepper and possibly dried herbs (unless it's steak au poivre which is a different story in regard to pepper). Any fresh herbs, fresh garlic (which you cite), dijon, etc I'd apply after searing. It would also depend ...


2

The bones will not make a difference in the moisture of your meat, but overcooking will dry your meat. Make sure you cook and reheat correctly, and you can remove the bones with no problems. (Plenty of folks cook boneless short ribs that are moist!)


2

There's two things you really need to control, the moisture of the surface of the beef and the heat / fat content of the pan. Always pat beef down with a paper kitchen towel (or whatever else you use) prior to seasoning it and searing it. It will sear considerably faster if you do this, which results in you having less time per batch for the fonde to burn. ...


2

Besides covering it tightly (possibly with the addition of liquid), you can also add some sort of covering to prevent the meat from drying out. You can place strips of bacon across the top, or make some sort of glaze. In the case of a glaze, you might want to let it develop some color first, then add the glaze as you can't brown it afterwards.


2

You're going to have some loss to be honest, it's the nature of the recipe. Egg white may help attach it but the flavor and texture are just wrong. Some things you can do are: Barbecue the meat, or use a grill pan: less contact with a cooking surface means less pepper gets rubbed off Use the right size cracked pepper: really big pieces tend to fall off, ...


2

The rule of thumb for a standard dinner is: 250g of protein 200g of carbohydrates 200g of vegetables for a man and: 200g of protein 180g of carbohydrates 200g of vegetables for a woman. But for a small dinner (<50 people) cook for one more person than is attending. (Better be safe than sorry) As you're having a dinner party (which normally takes ...


1

With meats, the general rule of thumb is 1 pound per dinner guest, especially when using a whole roast, turkey, or something similar that requires carving. Assume 2 scallops per person on average, as not everyone will be interested in this type of shellfish. As for shrimp, I always refer to the table found on this page: https://farmtotableasiansecrets....


1

Use the ribs as a roasting rack. In the spirit of the day, I will share with you my favorite technique. For rare, rare, cook to 120F (49C), that will carry over to 125F (52C).


1

Also consider that long exposure to heat actually removes the flavour from a lot of herbs and spices that really need to be added at the or near the end of the cooking. You could try infusing flavour into the meat with a syringe, or making sure to sear the entire outside very well prior to placing the roast into the slow cooker. Also, proper seasoning (...


1

Lamb meat is tougher and more fatty than your typical beef roast. 2 cups of red wine is a lot of acidic liquid and that can eat away at the meat as to tenderize it. Your mother may be right, some beef stock to thin out the alcohol may in fact do the trick. Also, rotating the roast would be a good idea as well since a beef roast will dry out at the top ...


1

I had the same problem. This is what I did. I took my already cooked rump roast, shredded the meat, melted some better over medium heat in a large pan. I added the shredded meat and a few splashes of broth from a beef bouillon cube. (just enough to moisten.) Then I seasoned it with garlic powder, salt, pepper, meat tenderizer, and Mrs. Dash table blend. ...


1

When you cook the meat in a closed dish then lots of liquid comes out. I have trouble understanding how flavour can enter the meat when cooking is extracting the liquid. Injecting the meat with a flavour (herbs etc) seems likely to be the only way of getting flavour in (unless you consider vacuum extracting moisture and then adding it back with flavour added?...


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