13

You use the leaves, not the carrot themselves. I don't know for sure this is what your Russian Civil War book was talking about, but I know it works, and besides, if they were desperate enough for acorn coffee and carrot tea, I imagine they were eating the carrots. This site suggests that you might need 1/4 cup of carrot greens per 1 cup of water; you can ...


10

Hello dennismv and welcome to Seasoned Advice! This page gives information and history on the faceted glass, so popular in Russia. From what I could glean from other sites your measurements are correct. For use in recipes you would fill to the top of the facets or, as you say, the natural edge. This would be 200 ml. **EDIT Update -- The recipe below, ...


9

wash, dry, shred, cut finely or julienne the carrots. dry it on a sheets of parchment paper until almost of the moisture is evaporated. then bake it in the oven on low heat until brown. http://img1.liveinternet.ru/images/attach/c/0//51/793/51793738_091127_ljv2.jpg result http://img1.liveinternet.ru/images/attach/c/0//51/793/51793915_091127_ljv3.jpg brew


8

That sounds like a beef Pirog, a Russian (and other surrounding areas) pie with meat (or other fillings) wrapped in pastry or dough and baked. There are also smaller stuffed pastries/breads called "pirozhki" in Russian (literally: little pies) that may be baked or fried. Polish pierogi are small filled dumplings. Similar in concept and pronunciation to ...


6

appears to be a similar concept to what one cup is in United States. Sadly, this is not the case. While the US cup is an imprecise way to measure baking ingredients, the Russian glass is even worse. The cup in the United States is a standardized measurement of volume. When a US baker has to measure a "cup", she doesn't use a cup from the cupboard. She ...


6

Traditional goulash is a stew/soup, usually using a cheaper cut of meat suited to slow cooking. It usually contains potatoes and other vegetables, as well as noodles. A true stroganoff consists of paprika-dusted fillet steak quickly pan fried with mushrooms and onions in a sour cream and brandy sauce. It is usually served with rice. I understand that in ...


6

For something more delicate than kitchen twine, any thread from a 100% natural fibre (cotton, hemp) should work. Synthetics (polyester, rayon, nylon) could melt or offgas into your food when subject to high temperature.


5

Don't use polyester, use kitchen twine instead.


5

The recipe's goal is to use the natural bacteria in the beets and beet peels to cause the fermentation. The thing about using natural bacteria is that you never know what these are going to be, so it's a crapshoot what flavors you are going to get. Beets produced in one farm may have radically different bacteria in them, different varieties grown in the same ...


4

I know the carrot tea my grandmother did it* it's super deliceous ande easy to make, everyone must try it. All you have to do is to grate carrots as you would for soup or stew, and dry them in the oven at the 40-100 C. And when they are dryed out put some in a tea pot pour hot water, sweeten it with honey and milk (or simply drink without any added things)....


4

I was born and raised in (at that time) Soviet Russia. Though my answer to your question is 3 years overdue, we did measure flour and sugar in cups, and the rest of the ingredients in grams or ml, for dry and liquid respectively. And yes, 1 Russian cup of flour is close to 1 standard American cup, but not exactly. I found, when converting my mother's old ...


4

I think what you've stumbled across here is an interesting implementation of a technique, and not really a specific dish. The technique (simplified) is poaching. It's just a very unique way of doing it. I've had eggs poached in black tea in Macau, and you'll also find the technique used in English and French cooking. There's an old recipe for scallops with ...


3

The Russian Wikipedia article on Beef has several diagrams - a current one in the main section apparently originally derived from the German wikipedia, and two others from older Russian sources. I was also able to find another site with another diagram, and translations of some of the cuts into English, which is helpful because the names are difficult to ...


3

Unflavored dental floss (the traditional kind, not the glide version) can be used and is finer than the kitchen twine. Toothpicks can also be used to close the pocket and may actually be a little easier to remove than thread. Best of luck with your dish!


2

The sour dough turns the rye dark - either from sourdough fermentation or from vinegar as some recipes require. The addition of some used coffee grounds (to get the last bit of goodness from it in hard times) helps the color too.


2

If you are handy with electrics and electronics, linking a heating element to a PID controller is probably your best bet for stability. This will give you quite stable temperatures. You can find many sets of instructions by googling homemade sous vide pid,which is a very similar application, although higher temperature ranges are usually the goal.


2

What you tried is nowhere enough salt for the fish. Both methods, drying it out in a bag of salt, and brining it in a saturated salt solution, are common. But this kind of high-salt brining is not similar to typical vegetable brining which is done with low-salt solutions. When they say a "saturated" solution, they mean it. The Internet says that this ...


1

Salt is needed to give the good bacteria an edge over bad bacteria that do not handle salt so well. The amount of salt necessary differs from maker to maker. While the salt does draw the moisture out of the cabbage, you can also make tasty sauerkraut in a typical fermented pickle manner - shred your cabbage, pack it in a jar, pour salty water over it and let ...


1

Traditionally in my family 1 glass means 180 gr. If you see the note - full glass it's approx 200gr (may be a little less).


1

You are doing fermentation without a domesticated culture. It is normal that wild microbial cultures won't have any refined taste. But a high amount of both acetic acid and CO2 is expected for most prolonged fermentation processes. So, what exactly did you expect beside that, that you are saying it is not good?


1

While the sous vide method will give you a very easy to use environment for great results with minimal effort, it requires expensive equipment. I have invested 70 Euro worth of materials, many hours pushing bits in ugly C code, and one 220-volts accident, and mine is not ready yet :( Commercial ones are much more expensive, and frequently out of stock. But ...


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