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5

There are special glass jars made to protect herbs from damaging uva/b rays, proven to maintain freshness. Granted, these little jars are designed for a "different" kind of herb, I, on the other hand, use them for my ultra expensive, direct from the middle east saffron. Keep an open mind and enjoy your saffron!!! www.herbpreserve.com


5

Interesting question. I have never experienced it myself, but I took a littlelook around to see if the answer was floating around somewhere. Perhaps the answer is as simple as this quote from Wikipedia suggests? Despite attempts at quality control and standardisation, an extensive history of saffron adulteration, particularly among the cheapest grades, ...


4

Easy: it wasn't saffron. Saffron are the stemen of crocus flowers, collected by hand. It's very expensive, and anything expensive will always have cheap knock-offs. A very common one is dyed safflower, which looks close but isn't any sort of substitute. Dyed corn silk, shredded onion skin, and other things are used. Basically if it's cheap it is almost ...


4

Before doing anything else, I put the saffron in a glass teacup with a tablespoon of water, cover with film, and microwave for a minute. That's usually ready when I want to put it in with the other ingredients.


4

From personal experience, I did not know how to cook with Saffron. So, I would soak it in a little bit of cold milk before adding it to my dessert and it never brought enough flavour or colour into my dessert. Then I started to infuse saffron in a small amount of warm water or milk, for approximately 15 to 30 minutes before adding it to the other ingredients,...


4

Searching for information about the taste of saffron, it seems that there are two camps - saffron that tastes of chlorine or plastic, and saffron that tastes/smells indescribably like saffron, perhaps earthy or like hay. Although it can taste bitter when used in larger amounts - e.g. a dash rather than a pinch. Some people find it can taste metallic or "...


4

According to McGee in On Food And Cooking (p. 423) the liquid should be warm or hot but he doesn't specify a particular temperature; an interesting aside is that he says while the main pigment is water soluble adding some alcohol or fat will disolve additional carotenoids. Here's the quote in full: Saffron is typically used in small quantities - a few ...


3

It's not unlike coffee or tea in that regard. You want a temp around 92 - 96C (197.6 - 204.8F) for the amount of time the saffron has in contact with the water. Once you have the desired flavor strength, strain it and set it aside. It's also very forgiving. If the water is hot enough to make a cup of tea or coffee, it's fine. Saffron won't get bitter unless ...


3

Use common advices: closed jars, in a fresh and dark place (a bodega is wonderful for keeping the spices). Direct sun is one of the worst enemies. And when everything else fails, consume it ... f.ex. this very simple recipe, just rice + veg stock + mushrooms + garlic + persil + saffron http://elsfogonsdelabordeta.wordpress.com/2010/11/24/arros-caldos-de-...


2

You can keep it in the freezer. It will probably keep for a really long time, if wrapped well and kept frozen. Spices in general can be stored in the fridge or freezer for a longer shelf life - just like most other foods. You will want to be sure to wrap very well and make sure the container is good, since it will be a problem if condensation accumulates ...


2

A quick search does not really give a good answer to your question For example, one recipe calls for 2 pinch of saffron for 2 cups of (dry) rice; another 3/4 tea spoon of crumble saffron for 3 cups of rice. Have a looksie at this wikihow page. In any case, I would highly suggest you try to find either Spanish or Iranian saffron, and if possible not pre-...


2

It seems that the answer is yes... The vast majority of the literature out there around saffron petals relates to the pharmacological compounds found in the petals. For normal use, the petals are considered a "waste" product from the production of saffron in the forms of the well known stamens used in food flavoring and coloring. However, I have found ...


1

I would be surprised if you find a precise enough scale to be useful in measuring saffron in a kitchen. A half gram of unground saffron will contain dozens if not hundreds of threads, and while ground saffron is less potent, it should still not require very much, so a pinch is probably roughly equivalent to a few strands.


1

I make saffron-orange cookies with cannabutter (citrus perks you up, and saffron is a natural anti-depressant, so I call my "happy cookies". I put the ground (in a tiny pinch of sugar) saffron into the warm (210 F) cannabutter for 30 minutes before I add the butter to the dough mix. The butterfat does the rest.


1

I have read that 2 to 3 strands per person is as much as you need to use when it comes to Saffron. Its not just overpowering to the dish but is also toxic in high amounts. One medical site states that a medical overdose of saffron, whether used in a dish or medicinally (caps), is five grams and the symptoms range from vertigo, jaundice, vomitting, ...


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