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16

As confirmed in comments, the dish is khoresht mast. According to this recipe and this video, the main ingredients seem to be lamb or beef neck, yoghurt, sugar, saffron, rosewater, and garnishes of pistachios and barberries. The lamb/beef is simmered with onion and turmeric then mashed and blended, and mixed with an egg yolk, yoghurt, and sugar. This is ...


5

I disagree with the accepted answer, as the question states it was a dessert, which does not apply to Khoresht-e Mast. I am Iranian myself and to me, it sounds more like a local form of Haleem. It's a sweet dish (dessert), which has creamy consistency, is always prepared with meat and thus, results in an as you called it "rope-y" paste. It's ...


5

Interesting question. I have never experienced it myself, but I took a littlelook around to see if the answer was floating around somewhere. Perhaps the answer is as simple as this quote from Wikipedia suggests? Despite attempts at quality control and standardisation, an extensive history of saffron adulteration, particularly among the cheapest grades, ...


4

Easy: it wasn't saffron. Saffron are the stemen of crocus flowers, collected by hand. It's very expensive, and anything expensive will always have cheap knock-offs. A very common one is dyed safflower, which looks close but isn't any sort of substitute. Dyed corn silk, shredded onion skin, and other things are used. Basically if it's cheap it is almost ...


2

A quick search does not really give a good answer to your question For example, one recipe calls for 2 pinch of saffron for 2 cups of (dry) rice; another 3/4 tea spoon of crumble saffron for 3 cups of rice. Have a looksie at this wikihow page. In any case, I would highly suggest you try to find either Spanish or Iranian saffron, and if possible not pre-...


2

It seems that the answer is yes... The vast majority of the literature out there around saffron petals relates to the pharmacological compounds found in the petals. For normal use, the petals are considered a "waste" product from the production of saffron in the forms of the well known stamens used in food flavoring and coloring. However, I have found ...


2

You can keep it in the freezer. It will probably keep for a really long time, if wrapped well and kept frozen. Spices in general can be stored in the fridge or freezer for a longer shelf life - just like most other foods. You will want to be sure to wrap very well and make sure the container is good, since it will be a problem if condensation accumulates ...


1

I would be surprised if you find a precise enough scale to be useful in measuring saffron in a kitchen. A half gram of unground saffron will contain dozens if not hundreds of threads, and while ground saffron is less potent, it should still not require very much, so a pinch is probably roughly equivalent to a few strands.


1

I make saffron-orange cookies with cannabutter (citrus perks you up, and saffron is a natural anti-depressant, so I call my "happy cookies". I put the ground (in a tiny pinch of sugar) saffron into the warm (210 F) cannabutter for 30 minutes before I add the butter to the dough mix. The butterfat does the rest.


1

I have read that 2 to 3 strands per person is as much as you need to use when it comes to Saffron. Its not just overpowering to the dish but is also toxic in high amounts. One medical site states that a medical overdose of saffron, whether used in a dish or medicinally (caps), is five grams and the symptoms range from vertigo, jaundice, vomitting, ...


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