16

There are three major properties an edible fat (I am assuming you are not asking about inedible oils like petroleum based products) has that affect how it is best used: Flavor Saturation Smoke point Properties Flavor The flavor of the fat is very important. So called neutral oils (like canola oil or refined grapeseed oil, or refined peanut oil, among ...


13

The flavors are very different -- white wine vinegar is made from white wine, while white vinegar is made from a distilled spirit. If you had to substitute white wine vinegar, I'd go with one of the following: champagne vinegar (made from sparking wine; tends to be more mild than white wine vinegar) rice vinegar (tends to be more mild / lower acid) cider ...


12

A vinaigrette is not a stable emulsion so it will eventually separate- however it will stay together long enough for the salad to be immediately served and eaten. I find that pouring the oil and acid separately creates a salad with a mouthful of olive oil coating the leaves and pool of vinegar at the bottom of the plate. It's true that the oil in a ...


10

A very small amount of xanthan gum will work. It is commonly used in salad dressings. Be careful though, too much will result in an unpleasant texture that some describe as mucus-like. Maybe start with 1/4 tsp. Wisk in and increase from there as necessary, but in very small amounts. Xanthan takes a while to hydrate and thicken. Start with a small amount,...


7

All the blender does is emulsify the mixture--it has no effect on how long it will keep before the dressing begins to spoil or go off. Normally, oil and water do not like to mix. The oil will coalesce into droplets, then rise to the top due to buoyancy, so that you will have a layer of oil above the water-based liquids. Blending the mixture will break up ...


6

Yes, you should refrigerate. Shelf life of foods which can be stored warm is determined by the fact that they are missing something which bacteria need to survive. For example, flour is missing water. When you mix up several ingredients which can be kept in the pantry separately, you never know when you will be adding back into the mixture whatever was ...


5

The existing answer by SAJ14SAJ addresses the food safety concerns really well. Blending won't change those. But as for taste, it may change earlier. The point is that your blender will introduce more oxygen into the mixture. And even though you have no good physical emulsifiers like mustard, the ingredients are heterogenous enough to act as not-so-good ...


5

So, first of all, pouring oil, then vinegar, directly onto the salad and tossing is a perfectly good way to dress a salad, especially if it's high quality oil and vinegar and that's all you're using. For some salads, like caprese, there's really no other way to dress them. In addition to the problem Sobachatina mentions (that it's hard to get even ...


5

They likely used white balsamic vinegar which is not cheap but has the kind of taste that sends people searching on the net ;) In character, it is sweeter than white wine, rice wine, and normal white vinegar and less acidic. btw, you can easily make your awesome own pesto in your blender using fresh basil, pine nuts, and olive oil. If you blanch the basil, ...


5

Most dressing is thickened by an emulsion, so @moscafj's answer of xanthan gum is probably the most direct improvement of this recipe if you're happy with the flavor balance. But another thing you might consider is looking for real aged balsamic rather than the thinner stuff most people use in salad dressings. Real aged balsamic is much thicker. When my wife ...


5

This particular dressing, unlike others that carry a botulism risk, only contains water soluble components. Oxygen will always be able to dissolve in here and prevent the botulism conditions, unless there is a TON of garlic at the bottom. Garlic botulism risk comes from creating an anaerobic environment, where the bacteria can act under a protective blanket ...


4

You might try red wine vinegar, or a rice wine vinegar perhaps, maybe even balsamic (I would go young, but I don't think this will taste good). You might just be missing a touch of sweetener like honey or sugar to cut the acid. Depending on how up tight the chef is, they may tell you their recipe, chances are you're not going to get the same thing from ...


4

Short answer: Homemade salad dressing, even with garlic, is generally considered safe, for a time frame of up to a week. While some strains of botulism can grow slowly at refrigerator temperatures, in general botulism requires three things to grow in addition to having spores present: Low salt, low acid environment Low oxygen environment Temperatures ...


4

It seems I was looking in the wrong direction here. It seems to have been the Mozzarella cheese. After pouring the dressing over the salad, the cheese started to leak some white liquid, which changed the colour of the dressing. This was something I hadn't on my radar, since I had always used the same brand of cheese, and it had never happened before. I only ...


4

I use this copycat recipe to make it at home. Depending on who's coming for dinner, I change up the herbs and the type of vinegar I use, and I usually use half black pepper and half white pepper. Other than that, just use it as is.


4

I always rinsed onions and shallots, to remove the compounds released when slicing through the cell walls. Since reading the following article in Cook's Illustrated March 2011 edition, I prefer its baking soda method. Toning Down Raw Onion’s Bite We’ve often heard the claim that soaking sliced or chopped raw onions in liquid can mellow their harsh ...


4

Anything, including a 'neutral' flavor, is going to change the flavor, even if all it does is reduce the 'intensity'. So what you need to find is what is an 'acceptable' change. With this in mind I suggest your best 'first choice' would be to warm your dressing slightly. Place the container or mixing bowl into a warm water bath. You are not trying to 'cook'...


4

Garlic can also add creaminess depending on how you prepare it, but you typically need a little course salt. (Which you said you're trying to avoid, so you'll have to decide if the small amount of salt is worth it) Basically, you finely crush or mince the garlic and then grind the salt into it until it's a paste. This can be done with a mortar and pestle ...


4

Well, adding more of everything but xanthan gum would of course have the effect of diluting the xanthan gum. The problem is, it's possible that you used way, way too much xanthan gum (easy to do, the amount you need to slightly thicken a dressing is minuscule), so unless you've got a few 50-gallon drums of balsamic vinegar lying around, I wouldn't advise ...


4

Acids and spices are generally used to add flavor to the mostly flavorless salad. To adapt recipes for your relative, you could try: Use less sauce or dressing. Of cause the fat content of a dressing is high, but if you drizzle just a little bit over the salad, the overall fat content is much lower. Use less sauce to reduce the absolute amount of fat. Use ...


3

According to Serious Eats, mayonnaise is even better! Honey or egg yolk work too. Whatever you do, use some kind of emulsifying agent. The same article shows the havoc a non-emulsified dressing will play on a perfectly innocent salad.


3

Lecithin is indeed a good emulsifier, available from egg whites or soy. Both egg whites and soy lecithin are available in powdered form and should be shelf-stable and usable with normal kitchen tools (scales and measuring spoons). Another powdered option is gum arabic (also called acacia gum), which comes from acacia resin. It's used a lot in commercial ...


3

In addition to the excellent primer by SAJ14SAJ, I would even more stress smoke point of various oils. Oils burn and give food a nasty flavor if they burn. You should be very careful not to use oil in applications that will cause oil to become higher in temperature than that oil's smoke point. Smoke Points of Oils


3

The most common vinegar for salad dressings I've used in kitchens is apple cider vinegar. It is definitely sweeter than white wine vinegar, and more affordable than balsamic. In fact, I wouldn't recommend balsamic vinegar, as it could easily overpower the flavor of the pesto, leaving you with more of a balsamic vinaigrette. Red wine vinegar is also common, ...


3

Emmy, I don't have Potbelly's specific recipe, but most "fat-free" vinagrette dressings rely heavily on corn syrup as a thickener and to dilute the vinegar. Given the sweetness you noticed with the Potbelly dressing, I would guess this to be the case with theirs as well. For example, these are the ingredients in WishBone's Fat Free Red Wine Vinagrette: ...


3

The brown stringy fibers form in the avocado flesh after it is bruised or the avocado is past ripe. The way to avoid this is to plan ahead. Buy your avocados when they are green and very hard. Try to select ones that have not been abused (at least if you see one being knocked around, take a different one). When you get the avocados home, set them aside in a ...


3

Yogurt comes in low-fat variations and in my experience they work pretty well. Yogurt can be used as a dressing. In a lot of instances you can make a nice dressing just by taking the recipe of a mayonnaise based dressing and then replacing the mayonnaise with yogurt. (I don't mean it will taste the same, just that the recipes will produce a still nice but ...


2

Try adding a bit of egg yolk. The lecithin in that usually helps these things emulsify. Obviously you can't do that if you're young/pregnant/old. If you don't want to try egg yolk. Put everything in but the oil. Add maybe half the oil and shake, then add a bit more and shake. Do it piece by piece as if you were drizzling into a bowl and mixing by hand with ...


2

My employer makes vinaigrette dressing professionally and distributes to Kroger stores, Meijer, and other chains. What Adisak mentioned about acidified ingredients is correct. In fact, you could acidify them yourself as we do. Mix the vinegar and flavors together (garlic, spices, etc...), and refrigerate over night. Make sure to blend/puree the ingredients ...


2

This recipe just has a lot of liquid in you can see her dressing is very fluid. If you're comparing it to bought dressing this tend to contain thickener to get the desired consistency so this is to be expected. There are lots of other recipes so might be worth finding one with less liquid to dry ingredients: more cheese, or other dry ingredients like ...


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