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37

This is physics. There's an effect called: "Granular convection" It's a phenomenon where if you have materials of different sizes in a container and vibrate or shake them, that the largest objects will move to the top and the smallest to the bottom. To keep the onion from sinking, you should make the chopped onion pieces bigger relative to the other ...


31

What you're looking at is called (in the US) "cross contamination". You have a food generally considered "unsafe" (beef) that is coming into contact with a food generally considered "safe" (salad greens). This contact makes the greens "unsafe" to consume raw. Cross-contamination is the transfer of harmful bacteria to food from other foods, cutting boards,...


23

I don't think the issue here is dicing vs slicing the onions. The reason why the latter appears to present better in this answer is in my opinion because of the size relative to the other ingredients. In the left hand image, the diced onions are much smaller than the tomato and cucumber, whereas the sliced onion on the right is a closer match in size. This ...


19

Tearing is NOT worth the extra effort, tested experimentally. Others have explored the theoretical reasons behind this, so I decided to test it in real life. I did this like so: Green leaf lettuce from the local CSA Cut one leaf with a sharp knife (stainless), and tore the second leaf carefully by hand (fast, clean tears) Pieces were both wrapped in moist ...


17

I found that slices float better and present better. They don't take much longer to cut and you don't need much onion for a salad. Slices on the right Thick slices can be cut to taste. You want some to sink. I like them for a little crunch. They're easier to pick out if anyone doesn't like onion at all. In some cases thin slices might be better, ...


16

No, it's not safe to eat those greens without cooking, for exactly the same reason it's unsafe to eat the meat that's touching them without cooking it. If you have to cook the meat before eating to make it safe, you would have to cook anything it's touched to make it safe. Maybe it's not quite as risky as eating the meat, but it's still risky. They could ...


12

A vinaigrette is not a stable emulsion so it will eventually separate- however it will stay together long enough for the salad to be immediately served and eaten. I find that pouring the oil and acid separately creates a salad with a mouthful of olive oil coating the leaves and pool of vinegar at the bottom of the plate. It's true that the oil in a ...


11

For a fairly typical thread on this, see: http://www.thekitchn.com/cultural-differences-salad-bef-65008 The so-called reasons I see listed here are consistent with what I found in several different internet discussions of the issue, none of which are scientificially or academically credible: Restaurants serve salad first because it is easiest to get out ...


11

Welcome to the site @User3176270. I'm not an expert in Halal but my understanding from my halal friends is that red wine vinegar is halal because the process of turning the wine into vinegar gets rid of all the alcohol. In fact, all vinegar is derived from alcohol, the sourness is created by bacteria that eats the alcohol and turns it into acetic acid, so ...


10

Refrigerating accomplishes several things: It is the right temperature to get the intended flavor. Flavors change with temperature, and some dishes get the correct taste when cold. Flavors get to blend more. Aromatic spices sometimes take time to soak into the sauce, and liquids absorb into the potatoes more Cold is an easy way to prevent spoilage. ...


9

It's interesting that the two main choices you've asked about are before or after the main entrée course. In my experience in England and in continental Europe (Spain, Italy, France etc.) the salad is served as a side dish alongside the main or entrée course and is intended to be eaten alongside this course sometimes in place of some form of vegetable dish. ...


9

Using both is fine. I would reserve some of the green end to sprinkle on top for presentation. The white part is stronger so you may want to add it a little at a time.


8

Here are a couple reasons why (for which I know) oil is used on salads: Oil caries in fat soluble aromas (often we use aromatic oils like olive oil, pumpkin seed oil, walnut oil, and so on, that are all very aromatic) and balances out other components (like vinegar or lime juice or some strong tasting veggies). it adheres to the surface of many leaves/...


7

Wilting in greens is triggered by temperature, pH, and salt content. To reduce wilting, you can cool the vegetables or shrimp, make the vegetables more acidic*, or decrease their salt content. My suggestion would be to cool the shrimp with an ice water bath or cold running water. This is the most traditional approach for shrimp salad. Alternately, you ...


7

I work around this by serving tomatoes on the top of the individual salads after they've been portioned out. I'm not sure of a way to keep them incorporated.


7

Harold McGee discusses this in On Food And Cooking. From the Preparing Salads section on page 318: If the leaves need to be be divided into smaller pieces, this should be done with the least possible physical pressure, which can crush cells and initiate the development of off-flavours and darkened patches. Cutting with a sharp knife is generally the most ...


7

Expanded from the comments... Use properly salted water when cooking the pasta. Slightly undercook the pasta a little bit; the pasta will continue to cook as you prepare the salad. Do not rinse the pasta. Mix the ingredients while the pasta are hot; they will absorb more flavour; I would try to season the pasta before adding oil; since oil will tend to ...


7

There is no law of nature that requires salad to be served in a bowl. In fact I rarely see it served in a bowl: I'm used to seeing it served on a plate. You can toss together the leafy components, dressing, and any other ingredients you want to mix well, plate them, and then sprinkle the onion on top and serve.


6

The browning of Lettuce leaves are due to the reaction of polyphenol(a chemical in any fruit or vegetable) and enzymes. This is due to two main causes: Aging Cell damage (i.e. from cutting, tearing) Every cell has separate chambers for these two, if they somehow leak, and get mixed up, this would cause browning. Cutting and tearing cause damage to the ...


6

My advice is simple -- don't plan ahead. Being fresh produce, most of us have no idea before you get to the store what the current stuff coming out of the local fields are. This is going to affect both price (in season stuff that hasn't been shipped from the opposite hemisphere is typically cheaper, especially w/ today's fuel prices), and quality (how long ...


6

A simple way is to, upon cutting, place your chopped onions into a bowl of ice water for 10-15 minutes before tossing into your salad (sans water, of course). I find this takes the 'spicy bite' and pungency out of them and leaves the crunch - whereas acid seems to affect the texture of the onion.


5

Tearing lettuce is worth the effort It takes a reasonably similar amount of time as cutting, and a different but comparable amount of work. If you are planning on eating the salad soon, all the above comments apply as to the browning effect. However, browning isn't the only consideration when deciding between cutting and tearing. Texture is as essential ...


5

In my experience lettuce will brown faster if cut instead of torn. However as most people are consuming the lettuce within the day, cutting won't make much of a difference if you plan on serving within the hour. It will generally show up the next morning. Iceberg and Romaine are the two lettuce types that come to mind as being nasty for browning. Also ...


5

So, first of all, pouring oil, then vinegar, directly onto the salad and tossing is a perfectly good way to dress a salad, especially if it's high quality oil and vinegar and that's all you're using. For some salads, like caprese, there's really no other way to dress them. In addition to the problem Sobachatina mentions (that it's hard to get even ...


5

Have you tried baking pasta, after boiling it in the water? I highly recommend you bake the pasta in the oven on very low heat, for 20 minutes, then you will see that there is no more liquid. Also it gives the macaroni a spongy condition which makes it able to keep the liquid in it. I believe if you bake the pasta before mixing with mayonnaise, you ...


5

Actually, you can make an emulsion using just garlic and olive oil! It's a very old spanish recipe traditionally done by hand taking mind numbing time. Seeing that you want to achieve thickness using your existing ingredients (no cheating with emulsifiers) here is a suggestion that should work (i haven't done it, just seen it done). Pay attention to the ...


5

You could chop all your veges with a knife once a week and put them in containers... If you are set on a machine, pick up a Food Processor (like a Cuisinart). It has attachments to slice or grate your veges quickly and uniformly, and has many other uses too (quick bread dough, sauces, puree soups, etc.) A Mandolin slicer will also work, and you can ...


5

Not trying to be flippant here, but perhaps the 5 minutes it takes to make your daily salad is not worth the added efficiency of a device of some sort. Vegetables like carrots and celery can be prepped during less hectic days of the week. Likewise, cucumbers can be marinated in wine vinegar, water & spices, to add a piquancy to the salad. Cherry or grape ...


4

As a metric, if you are concerned about cutting back on sugar you might consider fruits and sugars with a lower glycemic load index (GI; higher causes spikes in blood sugar) as a metric for seeking more ingredients. Sugars with low glycemic load indices are agave nectar (GI: 15) and brown rice syrup (GI: 25), relative to white sugar and honey. Fruits ...


4

Many consider salad a secondary food in the hierarchy. You can eat more meat if you skip the salad, or eat it last. If you eat salad first (without 100% fat drizzled salad dressing) you fill your stomach with fewer calories by volume. Your total caloric intake could possibly be reduced by eating salad first.


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