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11

Room temperature for sure! Eating something like salami chilled detracts from its flavour. Obviously you want to be a bit careful about leaving it out for a really long time, but I usually take anything I want to eat out of the fridge well before consumption.


8

The short answer is yes, salumi produced in the US is a fermented product. The process is different from salumi produced in Europe, but it is still a fermented product. In the US, producers rely on rapidly lowering the pH by using fast acting starter cultures and higher curing temperatures (as high as 104 F). Whereas in Europe, a lower temperature, and ...


7

The website specifically says : All of our salame are cured and naturally aged. Other salumi items like our Mortadella are spiced and cooked in the Italian tradition. The problem is that there are two classifications of meat that only vary by a letter: Salami (the plural of salame) are cured, air-dried meats. They can be stored at room temperature (at ...


7

Pepperoni is basically just a spiced pork and beef salami with some smokiness in it, you could achieve a similar flavor by using some smoked chili powder like paprika or chipotle. You also aren't going to get very far trying to make a salami spicy by adding pepper to it beforehand, like injecting it with some sort of spice mix as there's not enough moisture ...


6

What I did to solve my problem was I made a thick cheese sauce with some of the pepperjack/sharp cheddar (grated some of it, coated in corn starch, melted in a little bit of milk), and mixed that into the meat mix, just enough cheese sauce to bind it, just enough to make the meat start sticking together (and I reduced amount of sliced cheese on top and ...


6

Not all salami recipes call for wine. I would advise finding one that doesn't include wine, rather than trying to adapt one that does: modifications to cured meat recipes are risky and potentially unsafe. Although replacing wine with vinegar sounds intuitively safe (in that it lowers the pH), it might have the effect of messing up the initial bacterial ...


5

Recognizing quality entails knowing the product and the producers. Obviously you need to taste and ask questions. The correct texture and flavor of the fat used in salumi is very important, as it is generally a very high proportion of the ingredient list (30 - 50%). In general, if you want "authentic" salumi, I would think you want to stay clear of most of ...


5

Take the salamis out of the bag. Are they complete sausages or has it been sliced? Whole sausages should not be kept in a plastic bag without desiccants even if it's just a ball of paper towels. Sliced salamis shouldn't be kept for more than a couple weeks. If they are whole, don't be fooled that you can just wash the skin, molds grow tendrils into its ...


4

While you might be technically correct if you were to call saucisson sec a salami, you do not make saucisson sec from commercial salami. Without knowing how the salami was produced it could be dangerous to try to do so. The pictures you posted seems to be of a cooked salami, which is significantly more perishable than its uncooked cousins. Traditionally, ...


4

I usually use a palette knife (frosting spatula) to separate the slice from the paper by sliding it betwixt the two. It is quick, but does require some care.


3

If it was normal blue cheese, there's a pretty high chance the mold is Penicillium roqueforti, which is harmless. However, if the mold comes from something else, it can be basically whatever. In order to assess what kind of mold it is, you need to evaluate if it could have gone from the cheese to the sausage. What kind of sausage is it? Was it saucisson or ...


3

Instead of salt, you could get silica gel. These crystals can be found by the bucket, not just in tiny packets. They also make a variety with an indicator that turns pink when they need to be changed. Bake to refresh them. Silica gel is amazing stuff. There is no way you'll not be able to keep the air dry with a mass of absorber tye same scale as the ...


3

You can marinade salami in the pickling liquid of canned pepperoncini around 10 minutes for that slightly off-sour taste and bite. Just drain it thoroughly and pat it dry before using. The acid helps permeate the fat content of the salami. As GdD suggests, you could add a teaspoon of smoked paprika and chipotle powder to the mix to give it that depth, and a ...


3

You can store the vacuum sealed bags in the refrigerator or the freezer. It would have been better to leave the salami whole for long term storage, simply to reduce the impact of oxidation and flavor loss. The only other thing that changes with slicing is the potential that you contaminated it, either by touching it or because your equipment was not clean. ...


3

Your binding challenge can be solved by: Julienne cut your meats so they are stringy and tangle together (but not too compact). Take most, not all the cheese from top and bottom layers and mix with the stringy meat (cheese becoming your binder intertwined in the meat. Put the meat and cheese in the oven to get a jump-start on the cheese to melt Finish the ...


2

Salumi are generally cured with the addition of starter cultures (Lactobacillus plantarum and Pediococus acidilactici, for example). These cultures add to the sour, tangy flavor, but also to the aroma. In addition, Here is a report on glutimate concentration in dry cured ham. (generally cured with salt alone). I am sure the mechanism in cured salumi is ...


2

It sounds easier to flip the wax-paper prosciutto and carefully peel the wax paper off, just make sure that the meat gets a grip on the surface of which you place it on. Another way is that you can try placing it in freezer for just a while until the prosciutto stiffens up a bit, and then attempt to peel the paper off the prosciutto, as the paper won't get ...


1

Salami is a generic term referring to all sorts of salt cured or cooked sausage, from a variety of countries and cultures. My guess is that pictured is German fleischwirst or extrawurst (Austrian cousin). The Italian version is mortadella, but typically has white chunks of fat and pistachio nuts.


1

Sandwich sounds wonderful. I would add some roasted red peppers & sundried tomato to make the flavor even more complex! To hold it together, I would make multiple layers of cheeses with the ground meats sprinkled between each layer. Another possibility could be to put the ground, fried meats in an "envelope" made out of thinly sliced prosciutto. Using ...


1

Take a Mozzarella cheese ball and break apart about 2 inch sections. Take enough that you think is going to be enough for how much meat you would like for your sandwich. Put the ingredients of meat and cheese together in a food processor. Grind together and then cook or sear the patties. The cheese should melt well enough to hold all of the meat with it, and ...


1

Not to discount any information in moscafj's answer, there are other factors that affect the aroma of certain salame and cured sausage products. Some, for example have natural salame aromas added to their mixture. From Academia Barilla : The meat is mixed with salt, spices and natural aromas. These natural aromas can be found in packages on the ...


1

Warning, ambient/room temperature means different things for different people; there is a big difference between 20c and 30c (google to convert to F). I will usually keep the salami in the fridge and take it out 1/2 hour before eating (depending on the actual room/ambient temperature). If you decide to slice the salami in advance, remember that each slice ...


1

Always at ambient temperature. Salami was always meant to be eaten "as is", and by that, I mean not cooked. It was originally designed as a method of preserving excess meat to be eaten later on in the year, when meat was scarce. IF you decide to heat up or cook your salami, no harm will come to you, but you will lose all the textures and flavours that you ...


1

It depends on how you wish to cook it. If you're making a sandwich then, of course, room temperature is the best, even taste wise! However, sometimes I like to add salami or sausages to an omelette or pasta and I heat it up in the pan as I'm cooking the food. In general, I think the serving temperature of salami all depends on personal opinion and how you're ...


1

Salami is a generic name used for a product made of ground meat, seasoned and then cured (or smoked). There are countless variations of Salami (here in Italy for example, i think every region has more than one traditional Salami). They can differ from each other on the meat used, the granularity of the grinding process, spices, use of just air or smoke as a ...


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